Connections

Calendar of Events

26 March 10:30 a.m. Baseball v. Albion College (DH) Woodworth Field
12 p.m.. Men’s Lacrosse v. Ohio Northern University, MacKenzie Field
3:30 p.m. Softball v. North Park University (DH), Softball Field
28 March Spring Term 2016 Classes Begin
28 March – 2 June 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays,“ENDGRAIN: IMAGES FROM WOOD, INK, AND PAPER,” selected images created by printing designs incised on wood blocks, 19th through the 21st centuries. A.M. Todd Rare Book Room, Upjohn Library Commons
29 March 7 p.m. Poetry reading by Mark Nepo, from his new book Inside the Miracle. Composed of of poems, stories, and essays, Inside the Miracle gathers lessons on suffering, healing, and wholeness from the author’s 28 years of writing and teaching. “It’s my hope,” wrote Mark, “that the trail of this lifetime conversation with suffering and care will be a helpful companion to anyone facing difficult times.”  Stetson Chapel
30 March 8 p.m. “A Surreptitious Sequence: the Catalan Numbers,” the 18th Annaul George Kitchen Memorial Lecture, Alissa Crans, Ph.D., Loyola Marymount University. Many of us are familiar with famous sequences of numbers such as the odd numbers 1, 3, 5, 7,…; perfect squares 1, 4, 9, 16, 25,…; Fibonacci sequence 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8,…; or the triangular numbers 1, 3, 6, 10, 15,… But what about the sequence 1, 1, 2, 5, 14,…? First described by Euler in the 1700s and made famous by Belgian mathematician Eugène Catalan 100 years later, these “Catalan numbers” take on a variety of different guises as they provide the solution to numerous problems throughout mathematics. Dalton Theatre
31 March 12 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. Red Cross Blood Drive. To schedule an appointment, log on to redcrossblood.org (sponsor code: kzoocollege) or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). Hicks Banquet Room
7 p.m. “Physics of Blackness: Beyond Linear Time,” lecture by Michelle Wright, professor of African-American studies and comparative literature studies at Northwestern University. In this talk, Wright shows how our current struggle to be diverse and inclusive in our thinking and activism has more to do with Isaac Newton’s laws of motion and gravity than most would realize. Blackness, for example, can only be understood accurately by drawing on different understandings of time and space–specifically going beyond linear time and the myth of universal progress. Moving from discussions of 17th century physics to 3rd century Christian religions, to 21st century African travel narratives to Black European postwar histories to Black Caribbean settlement in 18th century Australia, Physics of Blackness goes around the globe through all spaces and times to show us the unexpected ways Blackness reveals and encounters itself. Dalton Theatre
1 April 11 a.m. Community Reflection–Little White Lies (and Big Ones). Join the Interfaith Student Leaders for a reflection on the lies we tell, the ones our parents told us, and all the other lies that make the world go-round. Stetson Chapel
3:30 p.m. Softball v. University of Chicago (DH), Softball Field
2 April 5 p.m. Keynote Speech at the Fourth Annual Westminster Art Festival by Sarah Lindley, associate professor of art at Kalamazoo College. The event begins at 4 p.m.; Sarah will deliver her address at 5 p.m. She was selected as keynote speaker because of her recent artistic focus on the Kalamazoo River and the Festival’s theme that asks artists to communicate the environmental challenges facing our time through the artwork they enter in the Festival. Westminster Presbyterian Church, 1515 Helen Avenue, Portage, Mich.
3 April 1 p.m. Baseball v. Adrian College (DH), Woodworth Field
3 p.m. Clarinet Recital by Alexandra Szeles (Senior Individualized Project), Connable Recital Hall
4 April 7 p.m. “Policy and Perspectives: An Election Year Forum.” An invited group of candidates (Republicans and Democrats) for local and state offices will address the issues and answer questions. Kalamazoo College Assistant Professor of Political Science Justin Berry, Ph.D., will facilitate. Members of the League of Women Voters–Kalamazoo Area will be present to register voters. This event–free and open to the public– is sponsored by K’s Mary Jane Underwood Stryker Center for Civic Engagement in conjunction with campus chapters of College Republicans and College Democrats. Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership (205 Monroe)
8 p.m. “Mathematical Modeling of Viral Dynamics from AIDS to Zika,” the annual Jennifer Mills Lecture by Dr. Jane Hawkins, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. We present theories on how mathematics can be used as an inexpensive and nonintrusive way to help cure, or at least better understand, some of the deadliest and most mysterious diseases on the planet.   We explore some basic principles in virus dynamics and how they are modeled by some simple mathematical systems.  And we provide an update on women working in math and medicine, as well as the relatively new field of mathematical biology, which nicely combines the two disciplines. Dewing Hall Room 103
5 April 3:30 p.m. Softball v. University of Michigan-Dearborn (DH), Softball Field
7 April 4:30 p.m. Concert by the Estrella Piano Duo, Dalton Theatre
8 April 11 a.m. Community Reflection–Why We Play. An annual community reflection focused on giving campus a sense of the greater purpose and meaning in athletics. Sponsored by the Department of Athletics. Stetson Chapel
2 p.m. Vocal Master Class with tenor Jeffery Picon, Connable Recital Hall
9 April 1 p.m. Baseball v. Hope College (DH), Woodworth Field (Re-scheduled for April 12, see below)
1 p.m. Men’s Lacrosse v. Albion College, MacKenzie Field
1 p.m. Women’s Tennis v. Calvin College, Stowe Stadium
8 p.m. The Mozart Requiem, by the Bach Festival Chorus and Arcato Chamber Ensemble, Jim Turner (conductor), featuring Kathryn Stieler, soprano; Phyllis Pancella, mezzo-soprano; Jeffrey Picon, tenor; and Nathaniel Olsen, baritone. Be transported by the genius and emotional power of Mozart’s glorious Requiem. Pre-concert presentation at 7 p.m. in the reception room.  Kalamazoo College Associate Professor of Music and Musicologist Dr. Zaide Pixley shares the mysteries behind this immortal composition. Ticket costs range from $5 to $28. Chenery Auditorium
10 April Time/venue to be announced. The City Sings Bach. Area church choirs and organists join in honoring the life and legacy of J.S. Bach by presenting a work by Bach and/or his contemporaries during their regular service. Participating churches will be part of a unique city-wide celebration of Bach’s musical legacy. Area Churches
11 April 7 p.m. Bach Around the Block Organ Crawl. The churches surrounding downtown’s Bronson Park have some of the most magnificent pipe organs in all of Michigan. Come and hear three of them played by the area’s most gifted organists at this progressive concert event. Presented in collaboration with American Guild of Organists – Southwest Michigan Chapter. Downtown Kalamazoo Area Churches
12 April 2 p.m. Baseball v. Hope College (DH), Woodworth Field
7 p.m. Women’s Lacrosse v. Hope College, MacKenzie Field
7:30 p.m. Bach’s Legacy Recital. Enjoy a program of chamber music performed by Kalamazoo’s finest local talent. Sure to be a delightful evening of classical repertoire. Light Fine Arts Building
8 p.m. “The Death of the American Dream,” Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Lecture by David B. Grusky, Stanford University’s Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Director of the Center on Poverty and Inequality, and coeditor of Pathways Magazine. Grusky’s research addresses the changing structure of late-industrial inequality and addresses such topics as (a) the role of rent-seeking and market failure in explaining the takeoff in income inequality, (b) the amount of economic and social mobility in the U.S. and other high-inequality countries (with a particular focus on the “Great Gatsby” hypothesis that opportunities for social mobility are declining), (c) the role of essentialism in explaining the persistence of extreme gender inequality, (d) the forces behind recent changes in the amount of face-to-face and online cross-class contact, and (e) the putative decline of big social classes. He is also involved in projects to improve the country’s infrastructure for monitoring poverty, inequality, and mobility by exploiting administrative and other forms of “big data” more aggressively. His recent books include Social Stratification (2014), Occupy the Future (2013), The New Gilded Age (2012), The Great Recession (2011), The Inequality Reader (2011), and The Inequality Puzzle (2010). Mandelle Hall Olmsted Room
13 April 12 p.m. Bach’s Lunch Concert. Enjoy this light lunchtime concert featuring faculty, students, and friends of the Kalamazoo College community. Bring your own sack lunch for this delightful one-hour recital. Light Fine Arts Building
3:30 p.m. Softball v. Hope College (DH), Softball Field
7:30 p.m. Conversation with Lisa Moses Leff, Ph.D., author of the award-winning book, The Archive Thief: The Man Who Salvaged French Jewish History in the Wake of the HolocaustThe Archive Thief tells the story of Zosa Szajkowski, a Polish-born Jewish historian who took tens of thousands of Jewish documents from Europe in the 1940s and 50s, illicitly moved them to New York, and eventually sold them to Jewish research libraries in the United States and Israel. Was this a heroic act of salvage or simply theft? In exploring this question, Leff raises questions about where the material remnants of the Jewish past are best kept. The Jewish Book Council just named Leff the winner of the 2016 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature. Leff is associate professor of history at The American University in Washington, D.C. In addition to The Archive Thief (Oxford, 2015), she is the author of Sacred Bonds of Solidarity: The Rise of Jewish Internationalism in Nineteenth-Century France (Stanford, 2006), as well as numerous articles about the Jews of France and archival issues. She also serves as the current Co-President of the Society for French Historical Studies. Mandelle Hall Olmsted Room, 1153 Academy Street.
14-16 April 8 p.m. (Thursday), 9:30 a.m. (Friday), 8:30 a.m. (Saturday). Seventy Years after Nuremberg: Genocide and Human Rights in Comparative Perspective, the Scholten Conference and workshop featuring Joseph Bangura, Kalamazoo College; David E. Barclay, Kalamazoo College; Daniel Chirot, University of Washington; Carter Dougherty ’92, Bloomberg News; John Dugas, Kalamazoo College; Hilary Earl, Nipissing University, Canada; Amy Elman, Kalamazoo College; Geoffrey J. Giles, University of Florida; Lesley Klaff Sheffield Hallam University, United Kingdom; Paul Gordon Lauren, University of Montana; Wendy Lower, Claremont McKenna College; Samuel Moyn, Harvard Law School; James Nafziger, Willamette University and American Society of Comparative Law; Raffael Scheck, Colby College; and Ronald Suny, University of Michigan. Seventy years after the end of the Second World War and the Nuremberg War Crimes Trials of 1945-46, it seems appropriate to reflect on genocide and responses to genocide in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  Although the study of genocide, the Holocaust, international human rights, and related issues has become an important – indeed essential – ingredient of academic scholarship and civic education, the current anniversary of the first war-crimes trials after World War II offers important opportunities to reflect comparatively, and in a focused way, on these vital matters. Mandelle Hall Olmsted Room
15 April 11 a.m. Community Reflection–Stepping Back: Reflections on Identity Abroad and Away. All are welcome for a reflection focusing on how students’ identities change after time abroad or away.   Sponsored by the Center for International Programs. Stetson Chapel
16 April 9:30 a.m. Poetry and (Work)Place: Inviting Your Vocation Into Your Poetry, workshop with McKenzie Lynn Tozan. Kalamazoo Poetry Festival. Upjohn Library Commons Room 306
9:30 a.m. Wanna Get Published? workshop with Kathleen McGookey. Kalamazoo Poetry Festival. Upjohn Library Commons Room 308
9:30 a.m. Your Teeth Feel Like a Road: Writing With Children in the Classroom and Out, workshop with Elizabeth Kerlikowske. Kalamazoo Poetry Festival. Upjohn Library Commons Room 305
11 a.m. Women’s Tennis v. Wheaton College, Stowe Stadium
12:30 p.m. Community Building Through Local Open Mic Showcases, workshop with Fable the Poet. Kalamazoo Poetry Festival. Upjohn Library Commons Room 305
12:30 p.m. Learning About the Poetry of Jamaal May and Natalie Diaz, workshop with Jane Huffman ’15. Kalamazoo Poetry Festival. Upjohn Library Commons Room 308
12:30 p.m. Unlocking the Poet Within, workshop for teens with Jennifer Clark. Kalamazoo Poetry Festival. Upjohn Library Commons Room 306
1 p.m. Baseball v. Trine University (DH), Woodworth Field
1 p.m. Women’s Lacrosse v. Olivet College, MacKenzie Field
2:30 p.m. Craft Talk and Q&A With Natalie Diaz and Jamaal May, led by Diane Seuss ’78. Kalamazoo Poetry Festival. Dalton Theatre
3 p.m. Young Vocalists Competition Award Concert. Light Fine Arts Building
7 p.m. Poetry Reading by Natalie Diaz and Jamaal May. Kalamazoo Poetry Festival. Kalamazoo Institute of Arts
17 April 10 a.m. Women’s Tennis v. Coe College, Stowe Stadium
3 p.m. Vocal Recital by Immanuel Greene (Senior Individualized Project), Stetson Chapel
19 April 4 p.m. Men’s Tennis v. Calvin College, Stowe Stadium
7 p.m. Men’s Lacrosse v. Olivet College, MacKenzie Field
21 April 4 p.m. Baseball v. Ohio Northern University, Woodworth Field Canceled due to weather
7:30 p.m. Exploring Museum Careers with K Alums, panel discussion with John Steele ’83, director of conservation at the Detroit Institute of Arts; Courtney Tompkins ’08, assistant to the Program of Research at the National Gallery of Art; and Holly Witchey ’83, director of the Wade Project at Western Historical Society, Cleveland. Are you interested in working in a museum, but unsure of how to get your foot in the door? Panelists will provide insight into the preparation needed for their roles and will provide an insider’s view into what goes on behind the scenes at different types of institutions. Reception with refreshments to follow. Dewing Hall Room 103
22 April 11 a.m. Community Reflection–Founders Day. Celebrating 183 years of community. Stetson Chapel
4 p.m. Kalamazoo College Professor of English Andy Mozina reads from his novel, Contrary Motion. Associate Professor of Music and Kalamazoo Philharmonia director Andrew Koehler (violin) and harpist Lorraine Alberts will perform Saint-Saëns Fantaisie for Violin and Harp, Op. 124. The K Bookstore will have copies of Contrary Motion for sale that Andy will sign. Lori (Andy’s wife) will raffle some copies of her harp CDs. (A review of Contrary Motion appears in the February issue of BeLight Magazine) Mandelle Hall Olmsted Room
6 p.m. Men’s Tennis v. Aquinas College, Stowe Stadium
7 p.m. Men’s Lacrosse v. Alma College, MacKenzie Field
23 April 11 a.m. Women’s Lacrosse v. Calvin College, MacKenzie Field
11 a.m. Men’s Tennis v. Olivet College, Stowe Stadium
2 p.m. Softball v. Olivet College (DH), Softball Field
24 April 10 a.m. Men’s Tennis v. Adrian College, Stowe Stadium
1 p.m. Baseball v. Olivet College (DH), Woodworth Field
2 p.m. Women’s Tennis v. Adrian College, Stowe Stadium
26 April 7 p.m. Men’s Lacrosse v. Adrian College, MacKenzie Field
27 April 3:30 p.m. Softball v. Saint Mary’s College (DH), Softball Field
28 April 4 p.m. “Molecular Chaperones Foster a Dynamic Genomic Environment,” Diebold Symposium Keynote Address by Brian Freeman, professor of cell and developmental biology, University of Illinois. Dow Science Building Lecture Hall (Room 226)
7 p.m. Women’s Lacrosse v. Saint Mary’s College, MacKenzie Field
7:30 p.m. Festival Playhouse Production of Immobile, a one-act play by Brittany Worthington ’13, directed by Maddie Grau ’16. After an accident leaves Alexander paralyzed, he asks his wife Megan for a favor: to leave him for another man. But when Megan finally meets someone, Alexander realizes he might not be ready to see his wife move on without him. The play follows three individuals under extraordinary circumstances, navigating their relationships, loyalties, and potential futures with one another. Dungeon Theatre
29 April 11 a.m. Community Reflection–More than Service: Working Together for Social Change. How do we practice civic engagement and “service” in our communities and the communities of others?  How do we practice reciprocal relationships, and what does that mean?  Join The Center for Civic Engagement for this thoughtful celebration of our work together. Stetson Chapel
8 p.m. Festival Playhouse Production of Immobile, a one-act play by Brittany Worthington ’13, directed by Maddie Grau ’16. After an accident leaves Alexander paralyzed, he asks his wife Megan for a favor: to leave him for another man. But when Megan finally meets someone, Alexander realizes he might not be ready to see his wife move on without him. The play follows three individuals under extraordinary circumstances, navigating their relationships, loyalties, and potential futures with one another. Dungeon Theatre
30 April 1 p.m. Softball v. Alma College (DH), Softball Field
8 p.m. Festival Playhouse Production of Immobile, a one-act play by Brittany Worthington ’13, directed by Maddie Grau ’16. After an accident leaves Alexander paralyzed, he asks his wife Megan for a favor: to leave him for another man. But when Megan finally meets someone, Alexander realizes he might not be ready to see his wife move on without him. The play follows three individuals under extraordinary circumstances, navigating their relationships, loyalties, and potential futures with one another. Dungeon Theatre
1 May 11 a.m. Women’s Tennis v. Albion College, Stowe Stadium
1 p.m. Baseball v. Alma College (DH), Woodworth Field
2 p.m. Festival Playhouse Production of Immobile, a one-act play by Brittany Worthington ’13, directed by Maddie Grau ’16. After an accident leaves Alexander paralyzed, he asks his wife Megan for a favor: to leave him for another man. But when Megan finally meets someone, Alexander realizes he might not be ready to see his wife move on without him. The play follows three individuals under extraordinary circumstances, navigating their relationships, loyalties, and potential futures with one another. Dungeon Theatre
4 May 7 p.m. “’The Lady of the Forest’” and Ecological Balance in the Sundarban mangrove forest of India and Bangladesh,” the 2016 Armstrong Lecture by Sufia Uddin, associate professor of religious studies at Connecticut College. The presentation explores the concept of “sacred grove” and its application to the relation between people and the Sundarban’s flora and fauna. Mandelle Hall Olmsted Room
6 May 11 a.m. Community Reflection–Yom HaShoah: Holocaust Memorial Service. Students speak about what remembering the Holocaust means to them on a personal or communal level.  Sponsored by the Jewish Student Organization. Stetson Chapel
2 p.m. Baseball v. Calvin College (DH), Woodworth Field
8 p.m. Concert by the Academy Street Winds (formerly known as the Kalamazoo College Symphonic Band), Dalton Theatre
7 May 8 p.m. Jazz Band Concert, Dalton Theatre
12 May 7:30 p.m. Festival Playhouse Production of Molière’s Learned Ladies. Guest Artist Marissa Harrington directs this comedy centered around a group of women intent on improving their social standing through intellectual achievement. So proud are these women of their quest for knowledge, however, that they neglect to realize that they aren’t actually gaining any.  Will they be able to distinguish between what is real and what is false? Tickets are $5 (students with ID); $10 (seniors 65 years or older, and guests of K faculty and staff members); $15 (general admission). Kalamazoo College faculty, staff and students may attend free of charge. Nelda K. Balch Theatre
13 May 11 a.m. Community Reflection–Failure. Faculty, staff and students talk about their experiences of failure and what they learned from those experiences. Sponsored by the Interfaith Student Leaders. Stetson Chapel
8 p.m. Festival Playhouse Production of Molière’s Learned Ladies. Guest Artist Marissa Harrington directs this comedy centered around a group of women intent on improving their social standing through intellectual achievement. So proud are these women of their quest for knowledge, however, that they neglect to realize that they aren’t actually gaining any.  Will they be able to distinguish between what is real and what is false? Tickets are $5 (students with ID); $10 (seniors 65 years or older, and guests of K faculty and staff members); $15 (general admission). Kalamazoo College faculty, staff and students may attend free of charge. Nelda K. Balch Theatre
14 May 8 p.m. Festival Playhouse Production of Molière’s Learned Ladies. Guest Artist Marissa Harrington directs this comedy centered around a group of women intent on improving their social standing through intellectual achievement. So proud are these women of their quest for knowledge, however, that they neglect to realize that they aren’t actually gaining any.  Will they be able to distinguish between what is real and what is false? Tickets are $5 (students with ID); $10 (seniors 65 years or older, and guests of K faculty and staff members); $15 (general admission). Kalamazoo College faculty, staff and students may attend free of charge. Nelda K. Balch Theatre
15 May 2 p.m. Festival Playhouse Production of Molière’s Learned Ladies. Guest Artist Marissa Harrington directs this comedy centered around a group of women intent on improving their social standing through intellectual achievement. So proud are these women of their quest for knowledge, however, that they neglect to realize that they aren’t actually gaining any.  Will they be able to distinguish between what is real and what is false? Tickets are $5 (students with ID); $10 (seniors 65 years or older, and guests of K faculty and staff members); $15 (general admission). Kalamazoo College faculty, staff and students may attend free of charge. Nelda K. Balch Theatre
4 p.m. String Students Recital with Karin Code, Connable Recital Hall
17 May 7:30 p.m. Piano Master Class with May Phang, Dalton Theatre
18 May 7:30 p.m. Piano Recital by May Phang, Dalton Theatre
20 May 11 a.m. Community Reflection–Imagining a More Just World: Personal Reflections on Justice and Change. Stories of social justice leadership that will help you think about how your passions can translate into transformative action.  Sponsored by the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership. Stetson Chapel
21 May 3 p.m. College Singers Concert, Stetson Chapel
22 May 4 p.m. Kalamazoo Philharmonia Concert, Dalton Theatre
23 – 28 May TBA. NCAA III Tennis Championships, Stowe Stadium
24 May 7 p.m. International Percussion Concert, Dalton Theatre
27 May 11 a.m. Community Reflection–The Cauldron. The unveiling of the 2016 issue of K’s literary magazine.   Discover the winner of this year’s Divine Crow Award, and hear the winning pieces read.  Sponsored by The Cauldron. Stetson Chapel
1 June 4 p.m. Applied Music Recital, Connable Recital Hall
3 June 11 a.m. Community Reflection–Sacred Music Celebration. Celebrate the diversity of students’ religious, cultural and spiritual traditions through the medium of music.  Sponsored by the Interfaith Student Leaders. Stetson Chapel
5 p.m. Burgers and Blues, Quadrangle
11 June 4:30 p.m. Senior Recital, Stetson Chapel
12 June 1 p.m. Commencement of the Class of 2016. Kalamazoo College Quadrangle
27 June 10 a.m. Hornet Golf Jamboree. Kalamazoo Country Club