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Calendar of Events

4 January Winter Term 2016 Classes Begin
4 January – 10 March 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. “Awesome Audubon: A Selection of Bird and Animal Studies by America’s Most Famous Wildlife Artist, including Prints of the Original Watercolors for Birds of America.” A.M. Todd Rare Book Room, Upjohn Library Commons.
6 January 7:30 p.m. Men’s Basketball v. Alma College, Anderson Athletic Center
8 January 11 a.m. Community Reflection–(Dis)abilities at K. What does it mean to be a person with a disability? Why is our culture uncomfortable with disabilities. Students with disabilities will speak from their experiences on campus. Stetson Chapel
9 January 3 p.m. Women’s Basketball v. Alma College, Anderson Athletic Center
13 January 7:30 p.m. Women’s Basketball v. Saint Mary’s College, Anderson Athletic Center
14 January 7:30 p.m. Face Off Theatre Company’s THE MOUNTAIN TOP, by Katori Hall, a play that re-imagines the events of the night before the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., Nelda K. Balch Theatre
15 January 11 a.m. Community Reflection–The Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Reflection. Faculty, staff and students speak from their hearts on this year’s MLK Day theme: Equity in Action Uniting Community. “Life’s most persistent and urgent question,” wrote Dr. King, “is, ’What are you doing for others?’” Stetson Chapel
Noon. Behind Closed Doors, exhibit opening reception with artist Justin David Brink. The installation will raise awareness about segregation and racism in America, past and present, and prompt conversations that lead to actionable change. Have we progressed? Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership
8 p.m. KADI Composition Concert featuring Adam Schumaker, Dalton Theatre
8 p.m. Face Off Theatre Company’s THE MOUNTAIN TOP, by Katori Hall, a play that re-imagines the events of the night before the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., Nelda K. Balch Theatre
16 January 3 p.m. Men’s Basketball v. Olivet College, Anderson Athletic Center
8 p.m. Face Off Theatre Company’s THE MOUNTAIN TOP, by Katori Hall, a play that re-imagines the events of the night before the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., Nelda K. Balch Theatre
17 January 2 p.m. Face Off Theatre Company’s THE MOUNTAIN TOP, by Katori Hall, a play that re-imagines the events of the night before the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., Nelda K. Balch Theatre
18 January Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday
10:50 a.m. Equity in Action Uniting Community, the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day address, Ms. Ora Stokes, Stetson Chapel
4 p.m. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Walk, Red Square
20 January 7:30 p.m. Women’s Basketball v. Rochester College, Anderson Athletic Center
21 January 5:30 p.m. Dinner and a Movie–“In Football We Trust” (Indie Lens Pop Up). The film follows four Polynesian high school football players in Utah struggling to overcome gang violence, family pressures, and poverty as they enter the high stakes world of college recruiting and the promise of pro sports. The odds may be stacked against them, but they’ll never stop fighting for a better future. For dinner, please RSVP to arcus.center@kzoo.edu by Wednesday, January 20. Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership
22 January 11 a.m. Community Reflection–Submission and Passivity: Are They One and the Same? The gathering will focus complicating the connotations of submission, a word often associated ith passive compliance, conformity or subordination. In what ways is submission dangerous? Can it be empowering? Stetson Chapel
23 January 1 p.m. Swimming and Diving v.  Alma College, Natatorium
25 January 8 p.m. “Economic Inequality and Political Power in America,” the 2016 William Weber Lecture in Government and Society by Martin Gilens, professor of politics at Princeton University and author of Affluence and Influence. Dr. Gilens’ research focuses upon the strong link between income inequality, representation, and policy outcomes. While his finding that the wealthiest minority in this country are the only ones who impact policy outcomes is not novel, the empirical evidence he provides for this common perception is overwhelming. Mandelle Hall Olmsted Room
26 January 5 p.m. “Neighbor Before the House: Syrian History, Syria’s Refugees, and Islamophobia in the Syrian Diaspora,” lecture by Beau Bothwell. Please RSVP to arcus.center@kzoo.edu by Monday, January 25. Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership
7:30 p.m. “All Space is Public. All Land is Indigenous. All Ownership is Violence,” artist talk by Wiisaakodewinini (Métis) artist, activist, and scholar Dylan AT Miner. Well known for his ongoing project, Anishinaabensag Biimskowebshkigewag (Native Kids Ride Bikes), Miner will discuss his artistic practice and scholarly work at the intersection of art, aesthetics, radical politics, and Indigenous issues, and he will position his practice within local and transborder Indigenous and settler-colonial histories as a way to think about potential alternatives to the present. Miner is director of the American Indian Studies Program and associate professor in the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities at Michigan State University. Connable Recital Hall
 27 January 6 p.m. Women’s Basketball v. Albion College, Anderson Athletic Center
8 p.m. Men’s Basketball v. Adrian College, Anderson Athletic Center
28 January 5:30 p.m.  Honoring Identity: LGBTQ Stories From Kalamazoo. In partnership with WMUK and the Kalamazoo Gay and Lesbian Resource Center, StoryCorps recorded interviews to document diverse voices from the Kalamazoo LGBTQ community, providing participants the opportunity to preserve their stories and help make history. Stories will be archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. More information. Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership
29 January 11 a.m. Community Reflection–How Does Your Identity Shape Your Experience at K? Members of the student organization Kalama-Africa share the diverse experiences of African students at Kalamazoo College and discuss the way culture shapes experiences and expectations. Stetson Chapel
30 January 3 p.m. Women’s Basketball v. Trine University, Anderson Athletic Center
2 February 4 p.m. Five Faces of Oppression. This workshop will be based on the article by the same name written by scholar Iris Marion Young. Participants will discuss definitions and current examples of five different forms of oppression and how to recognize each as they manifest on personal and institutional levels today. For dinner, please RSVP to arcus.center@kzoo.edu by Monday, February 1. Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership
 3 February 5:30 p.m. Dinner and a Movie–“Radical Grace,” with special guest Sister Simone Campbell. When the Vatican reprimands U.S. nuns — citing their “radical feminism” — three fearless nuns risk their place in the Church to follow another higher calling: social justice. One sister takes on Church patriarchy, another finds hope in the former prisoners she counsels, and the third launches a cross-country Nuns on the Bus tour, leveraging her newfound fame to spotlight social needs. These sisters “bring humor and down-to-earth grit to an epic battle for justice, equality and the dignity of women” (Gene Siskel Film Center). Following their struggles through the election of Pope Francis, Radical Grace captures a period of dramatic transformation as the Catholic Church grapples with the modern word. For dinner, please RSVP to arcus.center@kzoo.edu by Tuesday, February 2. Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership
6 p.m. Women’s Basketball v. Olivet College, Anderson Athletic Center
8 p.m. Men’s Basketball v. Trine University, Anderson Athletic Center
5 February Mid-Term Break
6 February 1 p.m. Women’s Basketball v. Adrian College, Anderson Athletic Center
3 p.m. Men’s Basketball v. Albion College, Anderson Athletic Center
11 February 5:30 p.m. Dinner and a Movie–“The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution” (Indie Lens Pop Up). A new revolutionary culture emerged in the turbulent 1960s, and the Black Panther Party was at the vanguard. Weaving together a treasure trove of rare footage with the voices of a diverse group of people who were there, Stanley Nelson tells the vibrant story of a pivotal movement that feels timely all over again. For dinner, please RSVP to arcus.center@kzoo.edu by Wednesday, February 10. Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership
 7:30 p.m. Festival Playhouse Presentation of FAMILY CRIMES, a one-act play about a family of three generations of Latina women, written and directed by Belinda McCauley ’16. $5 general admission. The Dungeon Theatre
12  February 11 a.m. Community Reflection–Valentine’s Day: Lots of Types of Love. Interfaith Student Leaders share their thoughts about the variety of forms of love and the myriad ways we express it. Stetson Chapel
 8 p.m. Festival Playhouse Presentation of FAMILY CRIMES, a one-act play about a family of three generations of Latina women, written and directed by Belinda McCauley ’16. $5 general admission. The Dungeon Theatre
13 February 3 p.m. Men’s Basketball v. Calvin College, Anderson Athletic Center
 8 p.m. Festival Playhouse Presentation of FAMILY CRIMES, a one-act play about a family of three generations of Latina women, written and directed by Belinda McCauley ’16. $5 general admission. The Dungeon Theatre
14 February  2 p.m. Festival Playhouse Presentation of FAMILY CRIMES, a one-act play about a family of three generations of Latina women, written and directed by Belinda McCauley ’16. $5 general admission. The Dungeon Theatre
16 February 7 p.m. World premiere of Heroes on Deck: World War II on Lake Michigan, a one-hour film documentary written, produced, and directed by John Davies ’75, and co-hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society and The Air Zoo in Kalamazoo.Heroes on Deck tells the little-known story of thousands of U.S. Navy pilots learning to take off and land on makeshift aircraft carriers in Lake Michigan from 1942 to the war’s end in 1945. More than 100 planes crashed into of Lake Michigan. Two of the more than 30 planes that have been recovered in recent years are being restored at the Air Zoo in Kalamazoo and are featured in the film. Artifacts from these planes will be on display during the premiere event. Several restoration volunteers will be on hand to answer questions after the film, as will filmmaker John Davies. Dalton Theatre
7 p.m. “Nones on the Rise: One in Five Adults Have No Religious Affiliation,” the 2016 Thompson Lecture by Jessica Hamar Martinez, senior researcher at Pew Research Center. The number of Americans who do not identify with any religion continues to grow at a rapid pace. One-fifth of the U.S. public–and a third of adults under 30–are religiously unaffiliated today, the highest percentages ever in Pew Research Center polling.  While “nones” aren’t interested in joining religious institutions, they often believe in God and remain deeply interested in spirituality.   Join us for a discussion of this changing American religious landscape. Mandelle Hall Olmsted Room
7 p.m. Reading and discussion with author Morowa Yejidé ’92 author of Time of the Locust, 2012 finalist for the PEN/Bellwether Prize. Sponsored by the English Department. Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership.
17 February 6 p.m. Women’s Basketball v. Hope College, Anderson Athletic Center
8 p.m. Men’s Basketball v. Hope College, Anderson Athletic Center
19 February 11 a.m. Community Reflection–Black Religiosity and Spirituality. Black individuals express their spirituality in diverse ways. In this gathering the Black Student Organization will share the ways African origins have affected and been incorporated into the contemporary American religious experience. Stetson Chapel
8 p.m. Symphonic Band Concert, Dalton Theatre
25 February 7:30 p.m. Festival Playhouse Presentation of BAD JEWS, contemporary comedy/drama about four Jewish American college students who meet in New York City for their grandfather’s funeral, directed by Ed Menta. $5 students with ID, $10 seniors 65 and older, $15 adults. The Dungeon Theatre.
26 February 11 a.m. Community Reflection–Perspectives on Acquaintance Sexual Assault and Harassment. Members of the student organization S3A reflect on experiences of acquaintance sexual assault and harassment at K. Stetson Chapel
8 p.m. Festival Playhouse Presentation of BAD JEWS, contemporary comedy/drama about four Jewish American college students who meet in New York City for their grandfather’s funeral, directed by Ed Menta. $5 students with ID, $10 seniors 65 and older, $15 adults. The Dungeon Theatre.
27 February 8 p.m. Festival Playhouse Presentation of BAD JEWS, contemporary comedy/drama about four Jewish American college students who meet in New York City for their grandfather’s funeral, directed by Ed Menta. $5 students with ID, $10 seniors 65 and older, $15 adults. The Dungeon Theatre.
28 February 1 p.m. Women’s Lacrosse v. Oberlin College, MacKenzie Field
2 p.m. Festival Playhouse Presentation of BAD JEWS, contemporary comedy/drama about four Jewish American college students who meet in New York City for their grandfather’s funeral, directed by Ed Menta. $5 students with ID, $10 seniors 65 and older, $15 adults. The Dungeon Theatre.
1 March 7 p.m. Poetry reading by Mark Nepo, from his new book Inside the Miracle. Composed of of poems, stories, and essays, Inside the Miracle gathers lessons on suffering, healing, and wholeness from the author’s 28 years of writing and teaching. “It’s my hope,” wrote Mark, “that the trail of this lifetime conversation with suffering and care will be a helpful companion to anyone facing difficult times.”  Stetson Chapel
2 March 6 p.m. Men’s Lacrosse v. Concordia College-Chicago, MacKenzie Field
7 p.m. International Percussion Concert, Dalton Theatre
4 March 11 a.m. Community Reflection–Stress Relief Sing-Along. Add your voice to some classic songs and, at the same, learn a little about managing stress. The music will be loud, the fun extreme. Keep the winter blues away with some great music and friends. Stetson Chapel
8 p.m. Jazz Band Concert, Dalton Theatre
5 March 8 p.m. Kalamazoo Philharmonia Concert, Dalton Theatre
10 p.m. Sketch-a-Etch, theatre production by Katie Lee ’16, $5 general admission, Nelda K. Balch Theatre
6 March 3 p.m. College Singers Concert, Stetson Chapel
10 p.m. Sketch-a-Etch, theatre production by Katie Lee ’16, $5 general admission, Nelda K. Balch Theatre
8 March 11:30 a.m. Piano Recital by Jeffrey Jacob, Connable Recital Hall
9 March 4 p.m. Applied Music Recital. Connable Recital Hall
11 March 11 a.m. Community Reflection–Latino, Hispanic or Chicano? The media frequently misidentifies the communities and identities of various brown people. Join the Latin Student Organization, MEChA and Hermanas Unidas for a reflection on the right to self-expression with the indentity that best fits each individual. Stetson Chapel
4 p.m. Men’s Lacrosse v. Carroll College, MacKenzie Field
Winter Term Classes End
13-15 March Winter Term Final Exams
28 March Spring Term 2016 Classes Begin
31 March 7 p.m. Lecture (title to be announced) by Michelle Wright, professor of African-American studies and comparative literature studies at Northwestern University. The lecture is part of The Physics of Blackness, sponsored by the Critical Ethnic Studies Program. Connable Recital Hall
1 April 4 p.m. Event with Michelle Wright (event title to be announced), professor of African-American studies and comparative literature studies at Northwestern University. The event is part of The Physics of Blackness, sponsored by the Critical Ethnic Studies Program. Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership
12 June 1 p.m. Commencement of the Class of 2016. Kalamazoo College Quadrangle
27 June 10 a.m. Hornet Golf Jamboree. Kalamazoo Country Club