Music

Professors: Bothwell, Evans, Ludwa, Koehler (Chair), Moon, Schumaker

The music department seeks to cultivate an understanding of the language and history of music and to nurture artistic skill and musicianship. All music performance opportunities, both solo and ensemble, are available to majors and non-majors alike. Academic courses in music theory, music history, and practical musicianship combine with music performance to provide an integrated approach to the discipline.

The major or minor in music intensifies this integrated approach to create highly creative, analytical thinkers with self-discipline and independent organizational skills. They are welcomed by graduate schools and employers alike.

Requirements for the Major in Music

Number of Units
Eleven units are required in addition to the prerequisite. AP credit accepted to meet prerequisite only.

Required Courses
Prerequisite: MUSC 105 completed with a grade of C or above. This prerequisite may also be met by examination or an AP score of 4 or 5.
MUSC 130, 135, and 235 Music Theory Sequence
MUSC 150 and 155 Music History Sequence
MUSC 148 Music of World Cultures
MUSC 490 Senior Seminar

Electives
Four elective courses in the student's focus area (see "About Focus Area" for more information) selected from:
Ensembles (at least one of the four electives must be an ensemble; see "About Music Ensembles" for more information)
Applied Music (see "About Applied Music" for more information)
MUSC 161, 162, or 163 Instrumental Methods
MUSC 165 Jazz Explorations
MUSC 205 Music and Identity (Sophomore Seminar)
MUSC 207 Listening Across Cultures (Sophomore Seminar)
MUSC 260 Conducting
MUSC 300 Intellectual Flows of Black Music
MUSC 315 Sound and Culture in the Middle East
MUSC 320 Arts Entrepreneurship
MUSC 465 Music Education Seminar

Additional Expectations
In order to successfully complete the Music Major, students must also pass a comprehensive integrative exam (administered as part of the Senior Seminar), and demonstrate aural and basic keyboard proficiency (accomplished through labs attached to the three-course theory sequence). With permission of the department, limited transfer courses and coursework completed abroad may count towards the Major. Majors who plan advanced music studies in graduate school or who aspire to professional careers are strongly encouraged to complete their senior individualized project in the department. Majors are also encouraged to participate in an ensemble beyond their one required unit, and to study applied music in each quarter of residency. With few exceptions, a full unit of applied music credited toward the Major must be achieved by the study in the same instrument. Musical performances on campus should be attended by Music Majors, including concerts by invited guests, by Music Department Faculty, and by fellow music students.

About Focus Areas
Music Majors and Minors, in consultation with their advisors, are encouraged to choose electives that combine to form a focused approach to a musical sub-discipline, such as - but certainly not limited to - Education, Performance, Jazz, Musicology, or Composition/Theory. Where appropriate, taking cognates in other fields (Business courses for those interested in arts administration or Psychology courses for those interested in Education or Music Therapy, for example) can strengthen the experience of the Music Major.

In addition, Majors may consider incorporating three recommended programs available to all students at the College into their own musical K Plan:

  1. The Career and Professional Development Cooperative Education & Internship Program.
  2. Study Abroad: The University of Aberdeen in Scotland offers particularly robust opportunities for qualified students to continue actively making music while abroad. In addition, with sufficient advance consultation with music faculty and the CIP office, it may be possible to create opportunities to continue music at several other study abroad sites.
  3. New York Arts Program: This domestic study away program offers an opportunity for qualified sophomore and junior student artists to live in New York City and work as interns with professional artists. The application process begins in late spring quarter for internships the following winter quarter. Information is available from campus faculty representative Andrew Koehler.

Requirements for the Minor in Music

Number of Units
A minimum of six units in addition to the prerequisite are required for the minor in music. AP credit accepted to meet prerequisite only.

Required Courses
Prerequisite: MUSC 105 completed with a grade of C or above. This prerequisite may also be met by examination or an AP score of 4 or 5.

At least one unit from MUSC 130, 135, or 235 Music Theory Sequence
At least one unit from MUSC 148 World Music, MUSC 150, or 155 Music History Sequence

Electives
Four elective courses in the student's focus area (See "About Focus Area" above for more information) selected from additional courses in the required list and/or:
Ensembles (See "About Music Ensembles" for more information)
Applied Music (See "About Applied Music" for more information)
MUSC 161, 162, or 163 Instrumental Methods
MUSC 165 Jazz Explorations
MUSC 205 Music and Identity (Sophomore Seminar)
MUSC 207 Listening Across Cultures (Sophomore Seminar)
MUSC 260 Conducting
MUSC 315 Sound and Culture in the Middle East
MUSC 320 Arts Entrepreneurship
MUSC 465 Music Education Seminar

Additional Expectations

With permission from the department, limited transfer courses and coursework completed abroad may count toward the Minor. Music Minors are encouraged to participate in an ensemble and to study applied music in each quarter of residency. With few exceptions, each full unit of applied music credited toward the Minor must be achieved by study in the same instrument. Musical performances on campus should be attended by Music Minors, including concerts by invited guests, by Music Department Faculty, and by fellow music students.

Music courses

MUSC100Program Music: Stories in Sound Program music is instrumental music influenced by an extra-musical source. In other words, the music contains a "program" or story. The program can be drawn from any source, but is usually taken from literature, myths, legends, landscapes, paintings, or personal dramas. Therefore, in addition to studying the music, this course will examine the extra-musical influences associated with the music. To further enhance your understanding and appreciation of this genre, you will produce four programmatic works of your own by creating multimedia presentations using music and images in support of an original story or borrowed program. No prior training or experience in music is assumed or necessary, and the course is intended for non-majors. The cultivation of intelligent and perceptive responses to programmatic music will be the primary focus as we explore the many aspects of this genre, be they cultural, mechanical, or expressive.
MUSC105Introduction to Music Study of the language, power, and communicative properties of music in the Western tradition. Students will acquire basic skills in music literacy, theory, and aural comprehension. In addition, selected works, both popular and classical and ranging in time from the Middle Ages to the present, will be listened to and discussed with an emphasis on their musical style and cultural-social context. Class activities will include guest performances, concert attendance (on and off campus), and behind-the-scenes looks at what goes into making music. Students considering a major in Music should enroll in MUSC 105 in the winter quarter of their first year. No prior music reading or basic theory knowledge is expected. Advanced students may request to test out of MUSC-105; please consult the Department Chair.
MUSC120Beginning Band Methods: Brass Basic techniques of playing orchestra and band instruments; emphasis on understanding the principles and problems of playing brass. No music reading or basic theory knowledge is required.
MUSC121Beginning Band Methods: Woodwinds Basic techniques of playing orchestra and band instruments; emphasis on understanding the principles and problems of playing woodwinds. No music reading or basic theory knowledge is required.
MUSC123Instrumental Music Methods: Strings Basic techniques of playing the four orchestral stringed instruments. No music reading or basic theory knowledge is required.
MUSC150Western Music Before 1750 Study of the developments in musical style from the Middle Ages through the Baroque including sacred and secular music of Italy, Germany, France, England, and the Netherlands. Representative works from all topics will be presented in their stylistic and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: Music reading and basic theory knowledge is expected
MUSC155Western Art Music After 1750 A historical and textual survey of the music produced during the Classical, Romantic and Modern ears. Representative works - among the topics considered will be Lied, Opera, Symphony, Programmatic Music, Atonal and Serial Music - will be presented in their stylistic and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: Music reading and basic theory knowledge is expected
MUSC160Music of World Cultures Study of music of various cultures within their social contexts. The course includes folk, traditional, classical, and popular music from selected traditions in Africa, India, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. It presents music as an evolving process and the performance of music as an expression of individual and cultural identity. Using readings, discussions, guest lectures and performances, CDs, and films, the course provides a framework for comparison of musical cultures from different parts of the world. No music reading or basic theory knowledge required.
MUSC165Jazz: A Creative and Cultural Exploration This course is intended to introduce students to the cultural context, instrumentation, theory, form, and analysis of jazz from its early West African roots to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on listening to various artists and styles. No music reading or basic theory knowledge is required.
MUSC175Western Music Theory and Analysis I Building upon the skills acquired in MUSC 105, students use two voice counterpoint as a gateway to fluency in writing complete four-part phrases in tonal harmony. They will discover how these principles of voice-leading and harmonic grammar form the foundation of historic and contemporary musical styles. Aural comprehension skills are acquired from the concurrent lab for the course.Prerequisite: MUSC-105 or permission
MUSC205/SEMN 256Music and Identity Music serves multiple roles: a force for social transformation, a flag of resistance, a proclamation of cultural identity, a catalyst for expressing emotion, an avenue to experiencing the sacred. Students will look at identity through the lens of contemporary and traditional American music and will consider how race, ethnicity, age, gender, national identity, and other factors express themselves in and are shaped by music. The ability to read music or understand basic music theory is not required; a love of music and an interest in American culture are essential. This course is a Shared Passages Sophomore Seminar. Prerequisite: Sophomores only
MUSC207/SEMN 210Listening Across Cultures What does it mean to be a knowledgeable music listener? An expert listener? A native listener? Hip hop has its "heads," French opera had claqueurs, and Syrian tarab has the sammi'a (expert listeners), but is the act of listening the same across cultures, or is there something to the local perception of music that goes beyond style and genre? Questioning the adage that "Music is the universal language," this course will examine how people assign meaning and power to music. Analyzing music from around the world, we will attune our ears to the ways in which people across cultural borders conceptualize music, sound and the act of listening. No music reading or basic theory knowledge is required. Prerequisite: Sophomores Only
MUSC260Conducting A study of the general rudiments of ensemble conducting through an emphasis on the orchestral literature. After an introduction to critical score-reading concepts (analysis skills, transposition, special terms, historical background), the remainder of the course is dedicated to practical application, with students receiving weekly podium time in front of a small laboratory ensemble. Offered spring quarter, even yearsPrerequisite: MUSC-105 or permission
MUSC275Western Music Theory and Analysis II Building upon the skills acquired in MUSC 130, students will study techniques of modulation, as well as expressive and coloristic devices leading to late 19th century chromaticism, leading into 20th century practices. These elements will be part of further study of popular and art song form, theme and variations, rondo and sonata. Class meetings will include both lecture and workshops. Coordinated aural comprehension skills are acquired from the concurrent lab for this course.Prerequisite: MUSC-130 or permission
MUSC295Social Justice Through the Arts SOCIAL JUSTICE THROUGH THE ARTS: From Hamilton to Woodstock The recent success Hamilton prompts us to ask "How have the arts stimulated and informed social transformation in America over the last 100 years?" This interdisciplinary course will involve readings, listening sessions, discussion, and research as the basis for an original performance-art piece incorporating spoken word, song, dance, and/or visual art to tell the story through an engaging final performance on campus. Designed to accommodate students who enjoy creative activity in a variety of disciplines.
MUSC310Intellectual Flows of Black Music This seminar-style course explores the histories of black music in the US and the broader African diaspora through the lens of music-making as intellectual practice. We will examine the work of black musicians, critics, and scholars as both aesthetic statements and attempts to illuminate, interrogate, and advance the philosophical, artistic and social issues of particular moments in history, and ultimately as ways of creating new possibilities for social and musical life. Ranging across genres, topics covered will include the African origins of American popular music, improvisation and experimentalism, music and faith, Afrofuturism, nationalism, sexuality and gender politics, blackface and 'blacksound', and issues of appropriation, ownership, and value. Offered fall quarter, even years.Prerequisite: Any 100-level Music course (excluding MUSC 161, 162, and 163) or Instructor Permission
MUSC/ANSO315Sound & Culture in the Middle East An introduction to the popular culture and cultural politics of the modern Middle East, as heard through the medium of sound. Exploring the varied soundscapes and musical cultures of the region, we will examine how sound shapes, reinforces, critiques, and transforms social life, from the local to the international level. Listening to music as both an aesthetic object and a site for the contestation of ideas, we will learn about the ways in which music is used to articulate an array of competing visions: of the nation, colony and post-colony; religion, gender, and sexuality; globalization, hybridity, and modernity.Prerequisite: MUSC-105, ANSO-103 or Instructor Permission
MUSC320Arts Entrepreneurship A look at the relationship between art, artists, presenters, audience, and funding in the 21st Century. Explore themes of entrepreneurship through case studies of successful artistic ventures and investigate the lessons learned from failed arts organizations. This course will be centered around the discussions of what it means to be an artist in the 21st century, what will engage future audiences, and how students with art degrees will pursue viable careers in the arts. Concepts studied will include but not be limited to: networking, non-profit leadership, organizational structure, non-linear career paths, fundraising, and audience engagement.
MUSC375Music Theory & Analysis III Building upon the skills acquired in MUSC135, students will refine their facility with the extended tonal harmony of the late-19th and early 20th centuries through analysis and model composition in multiple styles, including jazz and popular music. Students will also explore post-tonal and non-common practice repertories (including serialism, process music, spectralism, indeterminacy, electroacoustic music, rock and pop) through set theory and extended harmonic methods as well as analytic paradigms centered on rhythm and timbre. Coordinated aural comprehension skills are acquired from the concurrent lab for this course.Prerequisite: MUSC-135
MUSC465Music Education Seminar An examination of the philosophy, methods, and materials for teaching instrumental, vocal, and general music, K-12. The course is designed to prepare students for successful careers in music education. Topics include rehearsal techniques, budgeting time and money, classroom methods and management, developing and maintaining an inventory, recruitment strategies, library acquisition and management, and networking skills. As part of the course of study, each student will be assigned to a large ensemble to serve as an assistant to the director. Each student will also engage in off-campus classroom observation. Offered by request. Prerequisite: MUSC-105 or permission; junior or senior standing.
MUSC490Senior Seminar Upper-division course whose objective is to encourage integration and discovery of relationships between such areas as academics, performance, career development, the SIP, and careers in music. Research and analysis skills will be connected to contemporary issues in musical life, themes in music history, and alternative perspectives in style analysis. Prerequisite: MUSC-148, MUSC-150, MUSC-155, AND MUSC-235; junior or senior standing
MUSC593Senior Individualized Project Each program or department sets its own requirements for Senior Individualized Projects done in that department, including the range of acceptable projects, the required background of students doing projects, the format of the SIP, and the expected scope and depth of projects. See the Kalamazoo Curriculum -> Senior Individualized Project section of the Academic Catalog for more details.Prerequisite: Permission of department and SIP supervisor required.

About Music Ensembles

All students at Kalamazoo College may participate in ensembles. Generally meeting twice a week for periods of an hour and a half, ensembles should not conflict with the regular course schedule. A student may earn up to 5 full units in music ensembles and applied music (See "About Applied Music") combined toward graduation; as many as three of those may be applied to the Major or Minor, and at least one unit of ensemble credit is required for the Major.

Music Ensembles

MUSCE201College Singers The largest choral organization on campus emphasizing diverse repertoire and varied performance experiences, including a major performance each quarter.Prerequisite: Vocal evaluation
MUSCE202Bach Festival Chorus Participation in the annual College Festival in conjunction with the Kalamazoo community.Prerequisite: Audition
MUSCE204Symphonic Band Emphasizing a variety of music for brass, woodwinds, and percussion; ability to play a band instrument required. Previous band experience expected.
MUSCE205Jazz Band Performance of standard and contemporary jazz arrangements for band and/or small combo; music reading required, but no previous improvisational or jazz band experience needed.Prerequisite: Audition
MUSCE207Kalamazoo Philharmonia A full symphonic orchestra that rehearses once weekly and performs at least one full program each quarter. Philharmonia members include community members and professional leaders in addition to students. Registered students also are required to participate in additional sectional rehearsals. Proficient string, wind, brass, and percussion players are invited to audition; previous experience is preferred.Prerequisite: Audition
MUSCE209International Percussion Ensemble Performance and study of International percussion traditions from around the world. Students may choose to participate in West African drumming or Japanese Taiko. One college concert is presented each quarter.
MUSCE211Improvisation Workshop For the inquisitive musician who desires to learn the why and how of jazz improvisation, theory, and composition, juxtaposed with intimate jazz ensemble playing with emphasis on improvisation.
MUSCE213Bayati Middle Eastern Ensemble The Bayati Ensemble is a joint student-community chamber orchestra that performs a range of musical styles from Arabic, Kurdish, Turkish, and related traditions. Some proficiency on an instrument/voice is assumed, but no audition is required.
MUSCE215Pit Orchestra Offered during quarters in which the Theatre Department presents a musical.

About Applied Music

Professional performers and teachers from the community join with the regular faculty of Kalamazoo College to teach individual lessons for a wide range of instruments and voice. These courses are open to all students, regardless of level, and each accrues 1/5 unit per quarter of participation. A student may earn up to 5 full units in music ensembles (see "About Music Ensembles") and applied music combined toward graduation; as many as three of those may be applied to the Major or Minor. With few exceptions, each full unit of applied music credit toward the Major or Minor must be achieved by study in the same instrument.

At the end of each quarter, every student taking applied music must play a hearing before a group of music faculty members. Attendance at two performance area classes and the applied music recital each quarter is also required of students enrolled in applied music.

Upon the recommendation of the instructor, very advanced students may present a department-sponsored recital.

An extra fee is charged for applied music instruction. Please see the section of the catalog entitled "Policies: Expenses, Refund Policies, Fees" for more information.

Applied Music courses

MUSCL217Chamber Music Instrumental and/or vocal ensembles arranged with the music faculty. Offered by request.
MUSCL221Group Music Production Fundamentals
MUSCL222Music Production Prerequisite: MUSC-213 or MUSC-214 or Permission
MUSCL224Composition
MUSCL225Jazz Arranging and Composition
MUSCL231Piano
MUSCL232Jazz Piano
MUSCL233Collaborative Piano
MUSCL234Harp
MUSCL236Organ
MUSCL241Voice
MUSCL242Jazz Voice
MUSCL251Violin
MUSCL252Viola
MUSCL254Cello
MUSCL255String Bass
MUSCL256Jazz Bass
MUSCL257Group Guitar Fundamentals
MUSCL258Guitar
MUSCL259Jazz Guitar
MUSCL261Flute
MUSCL263Oboe
MUSCL265Clarinet
MUSCL266Saxophone
MUSCL268Bassoon
MUSCL271French Horn
MUSCL273Trumpet
MUSCL275Trombone
MUSCL276Euphonium
MUSCL277Tuba
MUSCL281Percussion
MUSCL282Mallet Percussion
MUSCL301Advanced Conducting Prerequisite: MUSC-260
This Academic Catalog is current as of Oct 16, 2018

An official catalog is produced each summer for the following academic year and stored in the Archives section of this site. These versions are used for degree audits. Throughout the year, approved changes are incorporated immediately. Updates that have been submitted and approved by early summer will be included in the archival catalog for the next academic year in mid-summer.