Going in Blind – The Roommate Search

When I was coming to K for my first year, I went into the roommate search blind. I was the only one from my high school coming to K, so I couldn’t simply live with a friend from high school. I decided to do what a lot of incoming First Years do– register for housing and hope for the best. Even though I was no stranger to having to share a space with someone, as I had already shared a room with my sister for a majority of my life, I was still nervous. What if my roommate (or roommates) were messy? What if they always wanted to blast music and never respect some quiet time for studying and homework? Or what if we just really didn’t get along? I was pretty anxious about the whole process, especially when all I could do was wait for the email with my roommate’s name and information.

I can’t lie and say that when that email finally came my worrying ceased. I think I actually became more worried. I now had the name and face of who’d I’d be living with for my first year at K, but I didn’t know what living with them would be like. I decided to reach out to my future roommate and get some basic introductions out of the way (this is something I highly recommend doing!). Even if you just talk a few times on social media or text, you can get a better sense of who your roommate might be as a person. Also, if you introduce yourselves and try to strike up a conversation in advance, it won’t be so awkward on move-in day as you two will already know a little bit about each other.

In terms of actually living with another person, it can definitely be a tricky thing. Sometimes people just click with their roommate or can adjust very easily to a new environment with new people. However, it’s definitely okay if you don’t. My roommate turned out to be super nice, very low-maintenance, and not messy at all. However, we still had to get used to each other’s presence and habits. No matter what rate you go in adjusting to living with someone, I think the best way to handle the change is to keep an open-mind. My roommate and I made sure to keep an open line of communication and not jump to conclusions over things we didn’t necessarily like or understand. For example, if your roommate is supposed to take out the trash and you come back and see it’s still there, it’s better to ask or just casually mention it to them without assuming they’re lazy or left it for you to do. You’ll save yourself a lot of trouble if you just talk and give each other the benefit of the doubt, for both the smaller and bigger things.

All in all, my number one advice to you is to trust the roommate process. once you receive your roommate assignment, remember that you both are experiencing a new place and new people together. Be sure to communicate and be understanding with one another, it can go a long way and be the first steps in creating a lasting friendship.

Karina Pantoja ’20