Skip to Main Content

public policy

10 Posts Back Home

Understanding Neoliberalism Is Key to Building a Global Struggle for Economic Justice

By Benji Hart

When Cornel West called out Ta-Nehisi Coates for representing the “neoliberal wing” of the black freedom struggle “that sounds militant about white supremacy but renders black fightback invisible” in The Guardian at the end of 2017, his essay received a fair amount of backlash. While some called his actions divisive, still others claimed the crux of his argument—that Coates “narrow racial tribalism and myopic political neoliberalism has no place for keeping track of Wall street greed, US imperial crimes or black elite indifference to poverty” —was flat-out wrong. West claims that Coates benefited from “a black neoliberal president” whose black respectability “‘opened a market’ for a new wave of black pundits, intellectuals, writers and journalists.”

Resisting the Trump/DeVos Education Agenda: What Will It Take?

By Pauline Lipman

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, a millionaire privatizer, made her name in Michigan with for-profit charter schools and a preference for private Christian schools. Her vision is to gut public education and teacher unions and replace public schools with vouchers. But to be clear, the ground for De Vos’ frontal assault on public education was prepared by the neoliberal policies of previous administrations. Neoliberal restructuring of public education has been a bi-partisan agenda in the U.S., going back to Ronald Reagan, so the challenges we face today are, in some ways, not new.

Policy and Possibility in the Movement for Black Lives Platform

By Matt Delmont | African American Intellectual History Society

Praxis Center is pleased to collaborate with the African American Intellectual History Society to present featured blog posts from their “#ScholarsRespond to a Vision for Black Lives” online forum. Organized by AAIHS Editors Keisha N. Blain and Ibram Kendi, other participating scholars include Gerald Horne, Duchess Harris, Peniel Joseph, Clarence Lang, Trimiko Melancon, Megan Ming Francis, Hasan Jeffries, and Matthew Delmont. These leading national scholars offer their compelling insights in response to the Movement for Black Lives’ (M4BL) vision statement  released on August 1, 2016. Together, these essays provide a platform for serious engagement with the six policy demands presented in M4BL’s vision statement: 1) end the war on black people; 2) reparations; 3) invest-divest; 4)economic justice; 5) community control; and 6) political power

Making Violence Visible: From #BlackLivesMatter to #StoptheBleeding Africa

By Emily Williams and William Minter

In June 2015, a coalition of six Pan-African activist networks launched #StoptheBleeding Africa in Nairobi, Kenya to curb the hemorrhage of resources from the African continent. As the #BlackLivesMatter movement continues to gain strength in the United States, this Pan-African coalition came together to expose and mobilize global support to end illicit financial flows – money that is illegally earned, transferred or used. Estimates of illegal transactions in Africa show a loss of at least $50 billion to $80 billion in wealth every year, a figure that would be incalculably more if transfers made legal by loopholes and unfair treaties were included. Some flows are only seen as “legal” because the laws are written and interpreted by those profiting from the system. Nevertheless, the outflow of clearly illegal funds is far greater than the estimated $40 billion a year that Africa receives in official development assistance.

Environmental Ethics & Public Policy

Environmental Ethics and Public Policy: This course examines the implementation of public policies to promote environmental ethics, focusing on environmental justice. The course will begin by reviewing different concepts of environmental justice. We then look to see how one might determine that a situation constitutes an environmental injustice. The third part of the course examines the processes and policies that are used to promote environmental justice in the United States. We conclude by examining specific policy areas in which environmental justice plays a significant role. Dr. Jeffrey Alan Johnson Westminster College

Navigate