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Poetry

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One Week of Poems on Love and Terror

By adrienne maree brown

In this moment, when the future is so uncertain, Praxis Center turns to poetic offerings by adrienne maree brown. As she wrote on her blog, “i still believe it is the core work of our species – to reason, to feel, to reconcile power and brilliance and compassion, to expand into our miraculous potential. i am relinquishing whatever illusions make me think i know the future, and making more room to co-create something worth living into. i am learning to create futures/poems/stories about what i don’t know, what i can’t explain, where i am not sure.” 

As we continue to do the work of building a more humane and just world, our words can help move, shape, and inspire us. We are “learning as we go.”

Ligatures for Black Bodies

By Denise Miller

Denise Miller’s stunning artwork is featured on the home page of Praxis Center’s website. Here, she shares three poems from her forthcoming book, Ligatures for Black Bodies, with Rattle Press in November. For Denise, poetry tells the stories of individuals in order to give the entire society its full voice. In Audre Lorde’s words: “our labor has become more important than our silence.”

Kids Who Die by Langston Hughes

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Mct8UB4XhY It’s been 77 years since civil rights activist and poet Langston Hughes wrote his chilling poem “Kids Who Die” which illuminates the horrors of lynchings during the Jim Crow era. Now, as we approach the one year mark of Michael Brown’s death and the Ferguson uprising that sparked a movement, we can see how Hughes’ words still ring true today.

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