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Pathology of Displacement: The Intersection of Food Justice and Culture

By Shane Bernardo WhyHunger.org

Food Justice is a seemingly all-inclusive term that speaks to the intersections of many different issues such as the rights of Mother Earth, the rights of peasant farmers and landless peoples, migrant farm worker and restaurant worker rights, and environmental justice issues, among others. What is often lost within these very important conversations about disparities of power, though, is the intersection between food justice and culture.

Food and culture is not just another illustration of intersectionality, but a critical point that speaks to the lived experience of those of us often found on the margins of well-intended, mainstream food justice movements. Examining this intersection further is part of an ongoing practice of what long-time Detroit-based movement elders James and Grace Lee Boggs called “moving away from protest politics and towards visionary organizing.”

Building Resilient Communities: A Moral Responsibility

https://youtu.be/e2Re-KrQNa4 Thunder Valley CDC is a community development organization that is working with the local grassroots people and national organizations in the development of a sustainable regenerative community, that creates jobs, builds homes and creates a National model for alleviating poverty in America’s poorest communities. Nick is a citizen of the Oglala Lakota Nation and the founding Executive Director of the Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation. Nick has over 15 years of experience in working with non-profits and Tribal Nations on projects that have a social mission. Prior to working with Thunder Valley CDC, Nick founded the Lakota Action Network which fought to protect Native American sacred sites, provide community organizing training while educating tribes in the implementation of sustainable renewable energy practices. Nick has been selected by the White House to lead the Ladders of Opportunity and Promise Zone Initiatives on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. In 2014 Nick…

Stolen People On Stolen Land: Standing Rock and Black Liberation

By Keedra Gibba

Note from the author: Since my visit to Standing Rock, the Army Corps of Engineers announced that they will not allow an easement permit for the continuation of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Indigenous Water Protectors have been standing strong. Many people around the world heeded their call to join in solidarity to fight this pipeline. The state’s recent concession does not mean the fight is over. As Chicago organizer, Kelly Hayes, has written in her article #NoDaPL: Why the Black Snake Isn’t Slain, “In my years of organizing, I have learned that concessions should not be met with less action, but with more. When the opposition is weakened, in any way, we should swing harder until whatever we were fighting simply can’t pull itself from the floor again. This round may have been won, but there will be more battles to come, and if we do not remain vigilant, I have no doubt we will lose them.” In that spirit, forging Black-Indigenous solidarity becomes even more urgent. We must celebrate this victory and redouble our efforts in our struggles for Indigenous sovereignty and Black liberation.  

Mni Wiconi: The Stand at Standing Rock

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FDuqYld8C8 Mni Wiconi features water protectors from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and allies trying to stop the 1,100-mile Dakota Access Pipeline – DAPL. Interviews in the film include Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s Chairman Dave Archambault II; Jodi Gillette, former White House advisor for Native American Affairs; Ladonna Allard, founder of Sacred Stone Camp; Winona LaDuke, founder of Honor the Earth; and Cody Hall, Red Warrior Camp spokesperson. Created by Divided Films with support from the WK Kellogg Foundation.

On Beating Extinction and Refusing Eviction: A Letter to #NoDAPL’s Frontline

By Kelly Hayes

I write these words on what’s a cold night in my city, and a much colder night where my heart is — with my friends in Standing Rock. My writing, which typically centers movements, often sways between news and analysis. My coverage of #NoDAPL has been no exception. But this piece is neither news nor analysis, because these words are for you, my people, for our Protectors and resistors — for those who aren’t seeking to be heroes, but who are nonetheless members of heroic movements and communities.

Learning Resistance and Building Solidarity: Black Lives Matter North of the 49th

By Shayna Plaut, Contributing Editor, Human Rights

“Ally is a complicated word; sometimes accomplice is better. Accomplices put their body on the line.”
– Dr. JP Catungal, Critical Gender and Sexualities Studies

As I joined the growing number of people standing vigil with Black Lives Matter Vancouver on Sunday July 10th, I immediately recognized Constance Barnes, a charismatic mover and shaker in the worlds of culture, green space and electoral politics of Vancouver. The last time I had seen her was four years ago. We hugged, then standing back she shook her head, “fuckin’ really? I mean, fuckin’ really? This is why my mother and father left the States 60 years ago. And here we are, again?”

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