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Violence Against Women—It’s a Men’s Issue

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTvSfeCRxe8 Jackson Katz, Phd, is an anti-sexist activist and expert on violence, media and masculinities. An author, filmmaker, educator and social theorist, Katz has worked in gender violence prevention work with diverse groups of men and boys in sports culture and the military, and has pioneered work in critical media literacy.Katz is the creator and co-founder of the Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) program, which advocates the ‘bystander approach’ to sexual and domestic violence prevention. You’ve also seen him in the award winning documentary “MissRepresentation.”

The Movement to #FreeMarissa: Building towards #SurvivedAndPunished

By Love and Protect and Survived and Punished

In 2010, Marissa Alexander, a mother of three from Jacksonville, FL, was violently attacked by her abusive, estranged husband. Just nine days after giving birth, Marissa’s husband strangled her, and tried to prevent her from escaping her home. Marissa was able to make it to the garage where her car was parked but could not open the garage door. Trapped, she retrieved her permitted gun from the car and re-entered her home where her husband lunged at her, yelling, “Bitch, I will kill you.” At that moment, Marissa fired a single warning shot upwards into the wall, causing no injuries, but saving her life.

Violence Against Women — It’s a Men’s Issue

https://www.ted.com/talks/jackson_katz_violence_against_women_it_s_a_men_s_issue#t-82307 Domestic violence and sexual abuse are often called “women’s issues.” But in this bold, blunt talk, Jackson Katz points out that these are intrinsically men’s issues — and shows how these violent behaviors are tied to definitions of manhood. A clarion call for us all — women and men — to call out unacceptable behavior and be leaders of change.

#IslamophobiaIsRacism Syllabus

By Su’ad Abdul Khabeer, Arshad Ali, Evelyn Alsultany, Sohail Daulatzai, Lara Deeb, Carol Fadda, Zareena Grewal, Juliane Hammer, Nadine Naber, and Junaid Rana | #IslamophobiaIsRacism

Inspired by the #FergusonSyllabus, the #StandingRockSyllabus, the #BlackIslamSyllabus and others, this reading list provides resources for teaching and learning about anti-Muslim racism in the United States. Although “Islamophobia” is the term most recognizable in public discourse, it does not accurately convey the making of racial and religious “others” that fuels the forms of discrimination Muslims face in the United States. The term Islamophobia frames these forms of discrimination and their roots solely as a problem of religious discrimination. Calling this a “phobia” suggests that this discrimination is solely a problem of individual bias, which obscures the structural and systemic production of anti-Muslim racism.

Neutrality Silences Marginalized People

By Lewis Wallace

In March 2016, I covered a Donald Trump rally in Vandalia, Ohio, for local radio station WYSO and NPR’s Weekend Edition. It was both familiar and eerie: Comfortable suburbanites, old people who’d driven hours from rural places, and children in red hats who cheered, then chanted, then jeered in unison, “Build the wall!” Trump told an apocryphal story about a U.S. general dipping bullets in pig’s blood before executing 49 Muslim prisoners of war. Protesters were dragged out one by one, and someone in the crowd shouted, “Off with their heads” as Trump mocked them from the podium. At the end of the rally, I ran into someone I knew: a man from a trailer park that had been facing frequent water shutoffs. I’d knocked on his door when I was reporting the first national story about that struggle.

One Week of Poems on Love and Terror

By adrienne maree brown

In this moment, when the future is so uncertain, Praxis Center turns to poetic offerings by adrienne maree brown. As she wrote on her blog, “i still believe it is the core work of our species – to reason, to feel, to reconcile power and brilliance and compassion, to expand into our miraculous potential. i am relinquishing whatever illusions make me think i know the future, and making more room to co-create something worth living into. i am learning to create futures/poems/stories about what i don’t know, what i can’t explain, where i am not sure.” 

As we continue to do the work of building a more humane and just world, our words can help move, shape, and inspire us. We are “learning as we go.”

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