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Myths about Teachers: We Need More Police in Our Public Schools

By Bill Ayers, Crystal Laura, and Rick Ayers

In “You Can’t Fire the Bad Ones“: And 18 Other Myths about Teachers, educators Bill Ayers, Crystal Laura and Rick Ayers flip the script on many enduring and popular myths about teachers, teachers’ unions, and education that permeate our culture. By unpacking these myths, the authors aim to challenge readers to rethink their assumptions about teachers. Praxis Center shares an excerpt from Myth 16: Teachers Are Unable to Deal Adequately with the Disciplinary Challenges Posed By Today’s Youth, and We Need More Police in Our Public School Buildings to Do the Job and Maintain Law and Order.

“Teachers Are Unable to Deal Adequately with the Disciplinary Challenges Posed By Today’s Youth, and We Need More Police in Our Public School Buildings to Do the Job and Maintain Law and Order.”

Public schools are plagued by gangs and fighting, assault and battery, drug dealing, and other criminal behavior, including, in extreme instances, actual shoot-outs between students. All of these hard realities demand an active and alert police presence to maintain safety, order, and discipline.

Schools must be safe havens for all kids, as well as for all school personnel. The good kids who want to learn and feel secure must be shielded from the actions of a minority of bad kids who get no discipline at home and have no respect for their classmates, the teacher, or learning itself. Suspending kids for bad behavior and sending them home may have made sense decades ago, but it’s no longer an adequate control: too often parents don’t believe in strong management and probably aren’t home anyway because the mother may be working two jobs, and in many cases the father isn’t home because he has left or is in prison.

Neoliberalism, Youth, and Social Justice

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KW5FRuMkQ6g In a special interview, Truthout contributor Henry Giroux takes us back to the basics of what can be seen as an ongoing and accelerating war between the rich and everyone else, an event that has resulted in a mass inability “to translate private troubles into larger structural public considerations. “We have no way of understanding that link anymore,” Giroux says, “because what we’ve done is we’ve defined freedom in a way that suggests it’s the freedom to do anything you want and screw everybody else.”

Other[ed.]: What is decolonizing education in the post-secondary setting?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=224O0tHb4NM The video “Other[ed.]: What is Decolonizing Education in the Post-Secondary Setting?” was created as a part of the 2014 University of Toronto’s International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (IDERD) Communications Campaign, observed annually on March 21st. The objective of the video is to explore the diverse perspectives on the meaning of decolonizing education; decolonizing practices (i.e. what it looks like inside and outside of the classroom, in teaching, and in institutional policies, practices and structures); and in its linkages to anti-racism change. Though decolonization references specific present day implication for both North American and transnational indigenous peoples (Tuck and Yang, 2012), we are conscious of the fact that the concept “decolonizing education” can also have a multiplicity of meanings from a number of different perspectives. It is some of these perspectives that we hope to highlight, in collaboration with students, faculty, staff and post-secondary institutions as a…

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