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On Contact: Restrained Resistance with Bill Ayers

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8rBeFw147E Chris Hedges discusses building successful non-violent mass movements with Bill Ayers, author of “Demand the Impossible.” Ayers reflects on his experience as one of the co-founders of the Weather Underground, a communist revolutionary group from the late 1960s that was dedicated to the violent overthrow of the U.S. government. RT Correspondent Anya Parampil looks at the rise and demise of the Weather Underground.

Hope Is a Choice: Love, Struggle and Justice in 2017

An excerpt from Demand the Impossible!: A Radical Manifesto
By Bill Ayers

In our pursuit of a world powered by love and reaching toward joy and justice, imagination is our most formidable and unyielding ally—the people’s common asset, an endowment to each one and the indispensable weapon of the powerless. Yes, they control the massive military-industrial complex, the sophisticated surveillance systems, the prison cells, and the organized propaganda—and these are on constant display as if to remind us every minute that there is no hope of a world without the instruments of death and oppression—and we have only our minds, our desires, and our dreams—and each other. And, yes, in a fixed war or a traditional conflict we are finished before we start. But it’s also true that there’s no power on earth stronger than the imagination unleashed and the collective human soul on fire. In irregular combat or a guerrilla struggle that pits our free imaginations against the stillborn and stunted imaginations of the war-makers and the mercenaries, we will win.

On Beating Extinction and Refusing Eviction: A Letter to #NoDAPL’s Frontline

By Kelly Hayes

I write these words on what’s a cold night in my city, and a much colder night where my heart is — with my friends in Standing Rock. My writing, which typically centers movements, often sways between news and analysis. My coverage of #NoDAPL has been no exception. But this piece is neither news nor analysis, because these words are for you, my people, for our Protectors and resistors — for those who aren’t seeking to be heroes, but who are nonetheless members of heroic movements and communities.

We Only Move Forward When We Demand the Impossible: An Interview With Bill Ayers

By Alice KimTruthout

Bill Ayers’ Demand the Impossible!: A Radical Manifesto urges a re-imagining of society as we know it. An insurgent educator and an activist for 50 years, Ayers says that staying within the boundaries of what is considered politically realistic limits our thinking. At a time when police violence and mass incarceration, war and environmental destruction, economic crisis and corrupt political systems are wreaking havoc on our lives, somebody has to step up and demand the impossible. And that is exactly what Ayers does in this book, a decidedly accessible text that insists that human beings have the capacity to remake a world with more peace, more justice, more transparency and more democracy.

Ayers critiques the world we live in — from the prison industrial complex to the health care system — to help us better understand the world in which we live. But more than that, he pushes his readers to unleash their radical imaginations so that we can fundamentally transform it.

With Love and Respect: #ScholarsRespond to A Vision for Black Lives

By Keisha N. Blain and Ibram X. Kendi | African American Intellectual History Society

Praxis Center is pleased to collaborate with the African American Intellectual History Society to present featured blog posts from their “#ScholarsRespond to a Vision for Black Lives” online forum. Organized by AAIHS Editors Keisha N. Blain and Ibram Kendi, other participating scholars include Gerald Horne, Duchess Harris, Peniel Joseph, Clarence Lang, Trimiko Melancon, Megan Ming Francis, Hasan Jeffries, and Matthew Delmont. These leading national scholars offer their compelling insights in response to the Movement for Black Lives’ (M4BL) vision statement  released on August 1, 2016. Together, these essays provide a platform for serious engagement with the six policy demands presented in M4BL’s vision statement: 1) end the war on black people; 2) reparations; 3) invest-divest; 4)economic justice; 5) community control; and 6) political power

Policy and Possibility in the Movement for Black Lives Platform

By Matt Delmont | African American Intellectual History Society

Praxis Center is pleased to collaborate with the African American Intellectual History Society to present featured blog posts from their “#ScholarsRespond to a Vision for Black Lives” online forum. Organized by AAIHS Editors Keisha N. Blain and Ibram Kendi, other participating scholars include Gerald Horne, Duchess Harris, Peniel Joseph, Clarence Lang, Trimiko Melancon, Megan Ming Francis, Hasan Jeffries, and Matthew Delmont. These leading national scholars offer their compelling insights in response to the Movement for Black Lives’ (M4BL) vision statement  released on August 1, 2016. Together, these essays provide a platform for serious engagement with the six policy demands presented in M4BL’s vision statement: 1) end the war on black people; 2) reparations; 3) invest-divest; 4)economic justice; 5) community control; and 6) political power

Digital Media and Struggles for Justice

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNUsEx4TRV8 Activists, educators and organizers reflect on the opportunities and challenges when using digital media in struggles for social justice. This project was funded by the Black Youth Project and the MacArthur Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics. Videographers Tracye Matthews Paris “Twiggy” Brown Tim McBride Donell McNairy Kelsey Phillips Editor Nuala Cabral Assistant Editor Mari Morales-Williams, PhD

Environment, Health & Society

This course draws on multiple sociological perspectives to examine two interrelated domains: 1) how dimensions of social organization shape the production and distribution of environmental health and illness in the United States; 2) how we know and regulate relationships between the environment and human health. Central to our examination is the question of how environmental health has been understood in various social worlds, at different historical moments, and by different (and often, competing) social actors. We will look at these questions across sites, including industry, clinics, neighborhoods, scientific laboratories, social movements, and government regulation and policy making. Dr. Sara Shostak Brandeis University Syllabus

Science & Popular Movements

Science & Popular Movements This class focuses on the ways that different kinds of social movements have engaged science and technology. It focuses on examples from environmentalism and medical research to find examples of “popular science” where scientists and non-scientists interact in surprising ways: 1) where non-scientists challenge scientists’ authority and knowledge, 2) where scientists act like a social movement, and 3) where scientists and regular people work together, sometimes cooperatively and sometimes competitively, to generate knowledge. Dr. Aaron Panofsky University of California Los Angeles

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