William C Anderson

Giving Up Toxic Masculinity To Build Real Resistance

By William C. Anderson, Race, Class and Immigration Contributing Editor

There is a love that should be more prevalent. In our communities overrun with toxic masculinity, a deep, radical love for women and all gender non-conforming people is especially important right now. The horror of white malevolence has personified itself in the realization of a Trump presidency. This is intricately linked to dangerous definitions of manhood that will only make these times worse. It’s imperative that the men who create this constant disarray realize that they’re going to be making life that much harder during these difficult times ahead.

Songs for Survival: A Playlist

By William C. Anderson

People have, at all times, been fighting against something heinous in the United States. Despite the ongoing injustice, oppression, and alienation that exists in this country, music is a saving grace for the nation. Dominating global markets, American pop, hip hop/rap, blues, and soul are known to people around the world. This music has its roots in Black America: music that often was and continues to be custom-made for survival. This sonic survivalism has been offered to everyone by the mere fact that its universal consumption has not been questioned much in the mainstream. Black music is for everybody (especially Black people). Like several other aspects of Black culture, the music is universally owned or claimed, although there are times when it becomes scapegoated for being responsible for a particular social ill; then it is solely Black people’s music. Still, it is consistently enjoyed by many through the ups and downs of the times.

Why We Dream About a World Without Police

By William C. Anderson, Contributing Editor, Race, Class, and Immigration

The last few years have been rough. President Obama’s last term in the White House has given many of us some of the most polarizing times we have ever experienced. It goes without saying that many have felt hopeless after being promised a change. Political disillusionment has clouded the air in a country struggling to find its true identity. In the midst of all this, unrelenting police violence has been in the spotlight driven by organized resistance to police brutality and renewed media interest. Police violence hasn’t necessarily gotten worse, but it’s being talked about more. This national conversation is absolutely necessary and should not let up. It’s important to utilize the tools we have – like our words – to rebel. Using words as resistance, Truthout recently published their first anthology, Who Do You Serve, Who Do You Protect? edited by Maya Schenwar, Joe Macare and Alana Yu-lan.

Harriet Tubman and the Monetization of Black History

By William C. Anderson, Contributing Editor, Race, Class, & Immigration | Truthout

There’s a strange irony in printing the image of someone who spent her life on the run because she was worth money onto money itself, as a supposed honor. This hasn’t stopped the US Treasury Department from announcing a change replacing Andrew Jackson with Harriet Tubman on the face of the $20 bill. While many people see the change as progressive and indicative of respect, others have taken issue with the contradictions therein. Capitalism, bolstered by slave labor and steadily craving more chattel, showed the US Bill of Rights and the Constitution to be fictional documents.

Confronting Anti-Blackness at Mizzou

By William C. Anderson, Race, Class and Immigration, Contributing Editor

Around the country, Black students on college campuses have captured the nation’s attention and imagination with their determined protests against institutional racism. The University of Missouri, or Mizzou, has been embroiled in an ongoing and growing student movement that led to the resignation of the school’s president, Tim Wolfe.

Socialist Politicians In A Capitalist World

by William C. Anderson, Race, Class and Immigration, Contributing Editor

When President Obama was running for office to secure his first term in the White House, an age-old claim used to smear politicians, activists, and celebrities in the U.S. appeared about him. He was labeled a socialist. As far back as McCarthyism and even before that, people have been blacklisted, imprisoned, and even killed for being described as such.

President Obama denies the “charge” of socialism, but the term itself was favorable with 36% of people across the country around the time. Socialism was still overwhelmingly viewed as negative by conservatives, but not with liberals.  A more recent poll found that 43% of millennials favor socialism as opposed to capitalism. Though much more will be needed than good approval ratings from millennials, a steadily progressing acceptance might be aiding the slow growth of openness around this political identity. Still, despite the excitement created by candidates and politicians who identify as socialist, we should reserve praise for their delivery of socialist policy and not just for the title.

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