Race, Class, & Immigration

Sawubona (I see you): Memory and Social Justice in South Africa

By Lisa Brock, Senior Editor

This piece is dedicated to my comrade and friend Ahmed “Kathy” Kathrada, who passed away earlier this week. As one of the Rivonia Eight, he spent 25 years in prison with Mandela. In 2009, he shared his Robben Island story with our group from Columbia College Chicago and in that same year shared a meal in my home in Chicago. I will never forget his commitment, his intelligence and his wit. He, and his cohort, had a way of spinning hardship and repression into funny stories. Go Well, Great One!

After Seven Long Years, Freedom: An Interview With Marissa Alexander

By Victoria Law | Truthout

As the clock struck midnight on January 26, Marissa Alexander was finally able to pull off her ankle monitor. The Florida mother of three was officially done with her two-year sentence of home confinement and electronic monitoring.

Despite the late hour, she drove to her sister’s house where she, her mother and her sister had a toast to her freedom. The next morning, she took her youngest daughter to breakfast before dropping her off at school; something that she’d never before been able to do with her six-year-old. That night, she took her 16-year-old twins to dinner. That weekend, family and friends threw a party in her honor. And finally, on Sunday, Alexander put a baseball cap on and headed to a local bar to watch the football game in anonymity. It was the first time the Jacksonville mother had been able to do so since her legal ordeal began in 2010.

Resisting the Trump/DeVos Education Agenda: What Will It Take?

By Pauline Lipman

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, a millionaire privatizer, made her name in Michigan with for-profit charter schools and a preference for private Christian schools. Her vision is to gut public education and teacher unions and replace public schools with vouchers. But to be clear, the ground for De Vos’ frontal assault on public education was prepared by the neoliberal policies of previous administrations. Neoliberal restructuring of public education has been a bi-partisan agenda in the U.S., going back to Ronald Reagan, so the challenges we face today are, in some ways, not new.

Building Resilient Communities: A Moral Responsibility

https://youtu.be/e2Re-KrQNa4 Thunder Valley CDC is a community development organization that is working with the local grassroots people and national organizations in the development of a sustainable regenerative community, that creates jobs, builds homes and creates a National model for alleviating poverty in America’s poorest communities. Nick is a citizen of the Oglala Lakota Nation and the founding Executive Director of the Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation. Nick has over 15 years of experience in working with non-profits and Tribal Nations on projects that have a social mission. Prior to working with Thunder Valley CDC, Nick founded the Lakota Action Network which fought to protect Native American sacred sites, provide community organizing training while educating tribes in the implementation of sustainable renewable energy practices. Nick has been selected by the White House to lead the Ladders of Opportunity and Promise Zone Initiatives on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. In 2014 Nick…

Advice for Traveling to Academic Conferences Under Travel Ban

There are two academic conference seasons in the United States where a majority of “international” academic conferences are hosted: mid-fall and late winter/early Spring. This year it can be remembered as: before and after the travel ban affecting nationals from seven majority-Muslim countries was announced. The American Anthropological Association, the Women’s Studies Association and the International Conference on Arabic and Islamic Studies had their conferences in the fall. The American Sociological Association, the Cultural Studies Association and the National Council for Black Studies are upcoming.

Giving Up Toxic Masculinity To Build Real Resistance

By William C. Anderson, Race, Class and Immigration Contributing Editor

There is a love that should be more prevalent. In our communities overrun with toxic masculinity, a deep, radical love for women and all gender non-conforming people is especially important right now. The horror of white malevolence has personified itself in the realization of a Trump presidency. This is intricately linked to dangerous definitions of manhood that will only make these times worse. It’s imperative that the men who create this constant disarray realize that they’re going to be making life that much harder during these difficult times ahead.

THE HISTORIOGRAPHY OF BLACK NATIONALISM: 1914-1974

IN THIS COURSE WE WILL EXAMINE HISTORICAL WRITING CONCERNING BLACK NATIONALISM FROM MARCUS GARVEY UNTIL THE DEVOLUTION OF THE BLACK PANTHER PARTY IN THE MID-SEVENTIES.  THIS STUDY WILL HELP STUDENTS TO UNDERSTAND THE EVOLUTION OF HISTORICAL PRACTICE CONCERNING A SPECIFIC SUBJECT.  WE ENGAGE IN THIS STUDY NOT TO DETERMINE HOW HISTORICAL PRACTICE OUGHT TO BE DONE (THAT IS THE PATRONIZING OF PAST HISTORIANS FOR HAVING GOT IT WRONG), BUT RATHER AS A WAY TO DEVELOP A REAL CURIOSITY ABOUT WHY THESE NARRATIVES OF THE PAST SOMETIMES LOOK SO STRANGE TO US AND WHY THEY SEEMED SO PERSUASIVE TO THE PARTICULAR AUDIENCE FOR WHOM THEY WERE INTENDED. THE HISTORIOGRAPHY OF BLACK NATIONALISM POSES ITS OWN PARTICULAR PROBLEMS AS DOES THE HISTORIOGRAPHY OF THE “SIXTIES.”  HISTORIANS ON THE LEFT OFTEN OFFER DESPAIRING ACCOUNTS IF FAILURE AND DECLINE.  THIS STORY TENDS TO SEPARATE THE SO CALLED “GOOD LEFT” FROM THE “BAD LEFT.” THE…

Passing Strange: Racial Crossings and the Construction of Identity in America.

In this class we will interrogate narratives of racial passing in a variety of forms. These narratives raise questions about the construction, reinforcement and subversion of racial categories. There is a rich trove of literature focused on passing within African American literature alongside many examples in the 20th century of narratives focused on ethnic masquerade and cultural assimilation.  In essence, if individuals can undetectably pass through social boundaries meant to keep them out, then the very act of passing calls into question the nature both of the boundaries and of the categories they delineate.  This course uses the paradigm of “passing” to examine notions of race (as well as gender, sexuality and class)to illustrate how those categories are produced. Using fiction, history and film we will endeavor to get a deeper understanding of the category we call race. Read more here.

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