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Race, Class, & Immigration

The intersectionality of racism, classism, and immigration policy is as pertinent today as in the past. Who is deemed legal and illegal, afforded full citizenship rights or not, is almost always determined by master-class politics and race.

Environmental Justice is Racial Justice: A Neighborhood Perspective

By Antonio R. López, Ph.D.

Editor’s note: The police killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and the epidemic of violence against Black and Brown youth in Chicago and nationally points to the urgent need for a more holistic understanding of environmental justice. Here, Antonio Lopez, Executive Director of the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization, offers a critical analysis of the intersection of race and environment in the Little Village community in Chicago.  

Little Village is a thriving barrio on the southwest side of Chicago. Children from this predominantly Mexican neighborhood are raised in a community saturated with beautiful histories of migration and resiliency. A hunger strike waged by local activists resulted in the construction of a social justice high school in Little Village. Elementary schools are named after Emiliano Zapata and a local Chicana activist, Maria Saucedo, and the main business avenue, 26th street, was even dedicated to Los Tigres Del Norte, a a norteño-band ensemble based out of San Jose, California, with origins in Mexico.

Complex and colorful murals in Little Village capture oppositional histories and showcase the artistic talent of the neighborhood. The streets are always alive with vendors and the shrieking sounds of kids playing on the tightly packed sidewalks.  Working in the community I am reminded of Segundo Barrio and other historic barrios where border crossers somehow survived Amerika and managed to build communities that nurtured several generations. Though far from the Mexico of their ancestors, children raised in Little Village are in touch with their roots – there is a beauty in the lack of confusion. (more…)

Rhetorical Bow Ties Won’t Protect Them

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By Mark Anthony Neal | NewBlackMan (in Exile) Following the election of the first Black President, I recall there was the sudden push—largely among young Black college educated types—for Black youth to wear the part of the constituency that had … Continue reading

Serve the People at the Bottom: Yuri Kochiyama

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By Scott Kurashige The following is a tribute to Japanese-American activist Yuri Kochiyama who died on June 1, 2014. I am one of thousands whose lives were immensely touched by Yuri Kochiyama. Not all of those people are Asian American, … Continue reading

Lampedusa boat tragedy: a survivor’s story

Repost from the Guardian. Last October a boat went down off the Italian island of Lampedusa, killing 366 migrants on board. What happened next? This is the story of Fanus, a survivor and one of thousands of people who flee Eritrea every year … Continue reading

The Evolution of American Revolutionary

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By Grace Lee I first met Grace Lee Boggs in 2000 while filming The Grace Lee Project, a personal documentary that took me on a journey to unpack the model minority stereotype of Asian Americans. I interviewed dozens of women … Continue reading

World Cup: The Underlying Implications

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By Jonathan Romero, Contributing Editor, Race, Class, and Immigration “It’s your world, my world, our world today and we invite the…whole world to play” so goes the official 2014 World Cup song “We Are One” by Cuban artist Pitbull, featuring … Continue reading

In search of the activist academic

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By Shayna Plaut, Contributing Editor, Human Rights When people ask me “what do you do?” meaning “what do you do for a living?” I find I have two options for how to respond. One is to look proudly in their … Continue reading