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Race, Class, & Immigration

The intersectionality of racism, classism, and immigration policy is as pertinent today as in the past. Who is deemed legal and illegal, afforded full citizenship rights or not, is almost always determined by master-class politics and race.

After Seven Long Years, Freedom: An Interview With Marissa Alexander

By Victoria Law | Truthout

As the clock struck midnight on January 26, Marissa Alexander was finally able to pull off her ankle monitor. The Florida mother of three was officially done with her two-year sentence of home confinement and electronic monitoring.

Despite the late hour, she drove to her sister’s house where she, her mother and her sister had a toast to her freedom. The next morning, she took her youngest daughter to breakfast before dropping her off at school; something that she’d never before been able to do with her six-year-old. That night, she took her 16-year-old twins to dinner. That weekend, family and friends threw a party in her honor. And finally, on Sunday, Alexander put a baseball cap on and headed to a local bar to watch the football game in anonymity. It was the first time the Jacksonville mother had been able to do so since her legal ordeal began in 2010. (more…)

Giving Up Toxic Masculinity To Build Real Resistance

By William C. Anderson, Race, Class and Immigration Contributing Editor There is a love that should be more prevalent. In our communities overrun with toxic masculinity, a deep, radical love for women and all gender non-conforming people is especially important … Continue reading

Luke Cage: An Exploration of Black Identity

By Marquise Griffin “Man, it is what it is. You can’t understand a man if you ain’t live what he lived.”             -Method Man “Bulletproof Love” I have a vivid memory of being in the Chicago Union Amtrak station in … Continue reading

River of Resistance

By Cheryl Johnson-Odim “Little by little the raindrops swell the river.” (African Proverb) All over this country, and the world, women (and some male allies) marched on Saturday, January 21st, 2017. Each woman who marched was a rain drop in a … Continue reading

One Week of Poems on Love and Terror

By adrienne maree brown In this moment, when the future is so uncertain, Praxis Center turns to poetic offerings by adrienne maree brown. As she wrote on her blog, “i still believe it is the core work of our species – to … Continue reading

Dreams for My Daughter

By Michelle Lugalia-Hollon Several months ago, during my daughter’s night time bath she pointed out that she wasn’t white like the tub, she was black, “like mommy.” I was thrilled! “That’s right!” I affirmed. “My biracial toddler identifies as black!” I … Continue reading

Ligatures for Black Bodies

By Denise Miller Denise Miller’s stunning artwork is featured on the home page of Praxis Center’s website. Here, she shares three poems from her forthcoming book, Ligatures for Black Bodies, with Rattle Press in November. For Denise, poetry tells the … Continue reading

#FreeBresha: We See You

By Deana G. Lewis On July 28, 2016, Bresha Meadows, a fourteen-year-old girl, took defensive action to save her family – her mother, her siblings and herself – from her father’s continued abuse. This was not Bresha’s first choice, nor … Continue reading