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praxis

Robust Imaginaries
             +
Informed Practice

Welcome to the Praxis Center, an online resource center for scholars, activists and artists hosted by the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership at Kalamazoo College. From action research and radical scholarship to engaged teaching and grassroots activism to community and cultural organizing, and revelatory art practice, we make visible imperative social justice work being done today.

Praxis is
the synergy between
theory and practice,
knowledge and relevance,
ideas, images, and the real.

Contact

Karla Aguilar
Program Coordinator
Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership
karla.aguilar@kzoo.edu
269-337-7033

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Black Youth Project stages “die-in” at Chicago’s City Hall: A Photo Collage

Compiled by Alice Kim, Editor
Photos submitted by FM Supreme, Bill Ayers and Martha Biondi

To protest the decision by a Missouri grand jury not to charge Officer Darren Wilson for shooting and killing unarmed teen Michael Brown last August in Ferguson, Missouri, members of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP 100) gathered outside of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s office on the 5th floor of City Hall on Tuesday, November 25. All day long, the group led die-ins, chants, songs, education and healing circles then marched down Michigan Avenue and streets in the Loop for several hours into the evening.

Charlene Carruthers, BYP 100 National Coordinator, told the Chicago Tribune that the group wants Emanuel to take a leadership role in talking to other politicians “to stop being complicit in the destruction of black bodies.” Continue reading →

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Bodies for Bullets

By Denise Miller

Author’s note: I wrote this poem to highlight the continued and deadly disregard for female bodies and brown bodies. The italicized sections however have been taken directly from the Declaration of Independence. Please feel free to add the names of others who have been killed and then copy and paste and repost the poem. Audre Lorde said, “Our labor has become more important than our silence.” This poem is a part of my labor. I am sick of silence. #sos

Artwork by Denise Miller

Artwork by Denise Miller

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Darren Wilson Wasn’t the First: A Short History of Killer Cops Let Off the Hook

By Flint Taylor, In These Times

The pre-ordained failure of a biased local prosecutor to obtain an indictment against Darren Wilson should not surprise us. But the movement for justice for Michael Brown has brought widespread attention to the nationwide problem of systemic and racist police violence and highlighted the movement that has come together to battle against it.

The Ferguson grand jury’s decision not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson for the killing of African-American teenager Michael Brown is heartless but unsurprising. But it is important to place the case in context with the history of police violence investigations and prosecutions in high profile cases—and the systemic and racist police brutality that continues to plague the nation. In doing so, there are lessons for the movement for justice in the Michael Brown case, as well as for those who are engaged in the broader struggle against law enforcement violence. Continue reading →

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