NancyGuevarra2
NancyGuevarra1
«
»

praxis

Robust Imaginaries
             +
Informed Practice

Welcome to the Praxis Center, an online resource center for scholars, activists and artists hosted by the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership at Kalamazoo College. From action research and radical scholarship to engaged teaching and grassroots activism to community and cultural organizing, and revelatory art practice, we make visible imperative social justice work being done today.

Praxis is
the synergy between
theory and practice,
knowledge and relevance,
ideas, images, and the real.

Subscribe for
updates!

 

Contact

Morgan Mahdavi
Program Coordinator
Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership
morgan.mahdavi@kzoo.edu
269-337-7033

Charleston and Donald Trump

By Lisa Brock, Senior Editor and Academic Director, Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership

Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina (Darryl Brooks/ Shutterstock.com)

Like many, my heart was broken upon hearing that 21 year-old Dylann Roof staked out the historic Emanuel AME Church in Charleston and after sitting in prayer with the elderly and welcoming parishioners, yelled, “You rape our women and you’re taking over our country, and you have to go.” On that tragic day, June 17, 2015, he methodically murdered nine people with the intent to kill more.

Because Roof was seen in photos linking his racist beliefs to the Confederate flag, because he slaughtered people in a church and because he killed a known and respected member of South Carolina’s State House of Representatives, the state’s politicians were finally shamed into heeding the four decades old call by black and progressive residents to remove the flag from the capitol grounds. After two days of emotional debate in the State House the flag was brought down on July 10, 2015 at 10 am.

State Representative Jenny Anderson Horne, a descendant of Jefferson Davis, leader of the Confederacy, said this in a raw and tearful plea as she pointed to black state representatives in the House Chambers:

“This flag offends my friend Mia McCloud, my friend John King, my friend Rev. Neal. I cannot believe that we do not have the heart in this body to do something meaningful, such as take a symbol of hate off these grounds on Friday.”

And she continued in her appeal, if this “is not done now, one is telling the widow of Senator Pickney and his two children that they do not matter…” Continue reading →

Comments on Charleston and Donald Trump

Alex Morgan says:

Thank you, Lisa. In particular, I appreciate your thoughtful analysis of Trump at a time while most folks are laughing at him. I think it’s important for us to recognize that he appeals most to 20 or so percent of Republican voters and that other candidates hold views in line with Trump as well.

Christina Cusumano says:

Thank you for this intelligent, thoughtful, and well-researched piece, Lisa. I will be sure to share it with others. … And Gail, please DO write that piece, inspired by what you have read here. I hope to read it when you do!

Lisa Brock says:

You should write that piece Gail and let us publish it. Thanks for responding and you too Joseph.

Gail Griffin says:

Excellent piece, Lisa. Trump’s words have been swirling in my mind with Dylann Roof’s words and you put it all together. I have also been thinking about how white women figure into the “taking over the country” trope since, as D. Roof said, we are threatened with sexual takeover by men of color, apparently. We are white male territory, threatened with invasion. I’m thinking of writing about it.

Joseph Jones says:

Great piece Lisa!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*


5 × two =

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Rethinking Truth-In-Sentencing in Illinois

By Joseph Dole

We are all aware of the dire fiscal state that Illinois currently finds itself in. One of the main causes of this has been years of passing laws without any consideration of the financial costs of their enactment: one of the most egregious examples of this being the Truth-In-Sentencing (TIS) law.

Truth-In-Sentencing in Illinois requires that nearly all violent offenders serve 85% to 100% of their sentences. Prior to TIS being enacted here in 1998, offenders served, on average, 44% of their sentences. Continue reading →

Comments on Rethinking Truth-In-Sentencing in Illinois

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*


− 4 = four

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Urban Planning in the Era of New Jim Crow

By Ryan Lugalia-Hollon | Next City

1996, the year the War on Poverty was to be won, nearly one of every three young black men in America was under correctional supervision, whether in prison, on probation or on parole.

Starting in the early 1980s, the War on Poverty had begun to be overshadowed by the War on Drugs. Instead of attacking the causes of concentrated disadvantage, the White House began waging a parallel battle on the people most visibly affected by it: black Americans in cities.

Rather than viewing poverty as the destructive force holding back many communities, the War on Drugs blamed illegal narcotics and those who distribute them. In the eyes of D.C. policymakers, drugs had torn apart neighborhoods — not concentrated unemployment, housing discrimination or struggling schools.

Though largely unaddressed by urban planners, this shift had huge implications for the practice of planning. Continue reading →

Comments on Urban Planning in the Era of New Jim Crow

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*


one × = 3

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>