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Bailey Mead
Managing Editor
Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership
bailey.mead@kzoo.edu
269-337-7398

The Cause That Is Care

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

By William C. Anderson

During the intense final moments of my mother’s life, I learned the intricate truths of the cause that is care. Dedicating myself to my mom’s caretaking helped me develop my own understanding of praxis. How we choose to live our lives is a reflection of our everyday politics. Care, simply put, is how we meet the needs of those we cherish in our families, communities, and the greater world we live in. Being tied to someone for the sake of helping them maintain their life, safety, and security is something many people may avoid doing. Others often feel compelled to care for loved ones, sometimes because we have no other choice but to do so, but also because we want to be there for for our loved ones in times of hardship and sickness. Continue reading →

On this Veteran’s Day, What to Black People is the National Anthem?

Thursday, November 9, 2017

By Lisa Brock, Academic Director, Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership and Senior Editor, Praxis Center

On July 5, 1852, Frederick Douglass, the prolific abolitionist, delivered his now famous 2000-word speech, “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?” His purpose was to illustrate the illogicality of US patriotism—that the values of freedom, liberty and the rights of citizenship for some Americans occurred alongside, and in dialectical relation to the obscene system of enslavement, exploitation, and torture of others. When Colin Kaepernick sat on the bench during the national anthem during the football preseason in August 2016, then took a knee during the anthem a few weeks later to protest police violence, he was making the same point; that there is a speciousness to a song meant to uplift some while being sinisterly imbued with a currency of inequality and state violence against others. Continue reading →

Life, Love and Death in Port au Prince

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

“Alina” is an excerpt from Lavil: Life, Love and Death in Port au Prince, an immersive and engrossing oral history collection edited by Peter Orner and Evan Lyon

How we live in relationship with others when practicing global health is personal and fundamental. This is even more urgent as “America First” threatens to bury the USA’s commitment to global health. Despite the overwhelming list of pressing issues threatening today’s world, we must keep focus on people, on each other. Lavil: Life, Love, and Death in Port Au Prince, edited by Peter Orner, a writer and story teller, and Evan Lyon, a global health practitioner, is a beautiful and tragic collection of intimate, raw narratives from Haitians in post-earthquake Haiti. It is a reminder of the fact that when we as global health leaders and practitioners become removed from the lives of the patients and communities that we serve, we lose our way. Continue reading →

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