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African Film Series at K, June 22-23

Four documentary films centering on social justice issues critical to both Africa and the United States and that also have global implications will be presented at Kalamazoo College, Saturday June 22 and Sunday 23, in the Light Fine Arts Building, Connable Recital Hall, at 7:30 p.m. Showings are free and open to the public.
      Saturday films are Fuelling Poverty (28 minutes) and Sweet Crude (93 minutes), which are about the destructive crude oil extraction economy and the Occupy Movement in Nigeria.
      Sunday films are God Loves Uganda (90 minutes) which analyses the political implications of the American evangelical movement in Uganda, and Native Sun (21 minutes), a film by Ghanaian rapper and visual artist Blitz the Ambassador.
      The Broadcast Africa Film Series is brought to Kalamazoo by The US-Africa Network (http://usafricanetwork.wordpress.com), an independent network with the aim of fostering an inclusive international and intergenerational dialogue about priorities and strategies for solidarity with Africa in the United States, in collaboration with Kalamazoo College’s Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership. Additional support is provided by Western Michigan University Housing and WMU Professor of Social Work and City Commissioner Don Cooney.
      The US-Africa Network Consultation is bringing together a small group of organizers, activists, and scholars living and working in Africa and the U.S. to discuss a broad range of issues such as human rights, economic justice, climate change, and threats to human security in both Africa and the United States.
      The US-Africa Network has come together in the belief that there is an urgent need to reinvigorate solidarity work between the U.S. and Africa. Their initial objectives are to foster an intergenerational dialogue on the future of U.S.-Africa solidarity work and to help activists both old and new to rethink, regroup, and claim a space for activism linking progressive movements in Africa and the United States.

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