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Paloma Clohossey ’11

Paloma works for the U.S. Department of State as an information officer on the organization’s foreign disaster assistance response team. She is based out of Washington, D.C. and has an apartment there. She has been in Liberia and Sierra Leone for most of the past 10 months working on the Ebola response. The photo shows her in Liberia crossing the river from Bong County to Gbarpolu County to visit a community care center. She still had a hour hike once she hit the shore. She writes a blog about her work.

Recently Paloma wrote her alma mater about one of those K connection moments she experienced in Africa. “Do you remember Deogratias ’Deo’ Niyizonkiza, who spoke at Kalamazoo during the Spring of 2011? Wanted to tell you that I met the co-founder of Deo’s organization, Village Health Works,–Dziwe Ntaba–here in Liberia, Dziwe accompanied Deo to Kalamazoo and remembers receiving a cozy. big black K sweatshirt. He is here as an employee of the NGO International Medical Corps that we (USAID) have funded and that has contributed an amazing amount to the Ebola response.”

Paloma also visits Kenya whenever she can. She did her K study abroad in Nairobi and returned to the country for her SIP. During those sojourns she got to know seven children whose education and care she continues to support. “I’ve been granted two weeks leave to fly to Kenya to spend with the seven kiddos,” she wrote last June. “They remain my personal priority–I still speak to them every few weeks and they are growing fast. They are doing well, studying hard, and I can’t wait to hug them for a few weeks.”

Jamie Sturm ’10

amieSturmJamie has been accepted into Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business. He will attend the school’s Cross Continent M.B.A. program for mid-career professionals, a program that includes residency components in Shanghai, New Dehli, Santiago and Istanbul. That squares well with Jamie’s K experience. He majored in international and area studies and studied abroad in both China and Ecuador.

Richard T. Stavig, Professor Emeritus of English, Director Emeritus of Foreign Study

Professor Stavig died on Sunday, Easter morning, April 5, 2015. He was 87 years old. During his tenure at the College Professor Stavig established his legacy in several areas. Generations of students remember him for his inspired teaching, careful scholarship, preparation and dedication to excellence. Colleagues at home and abroad owe a great deal to his skills as a gifted administrator. The College community benefits from the legacy of his high ethical and moral standards.

In 1955 Professor Stavig began his 37-year career at Kalamazoo College as an assistant professor of English. Some 30 years later–in a speech he gave on Honors Day (October 31, 1986) about the beginning of study abroad at Kalamazoo College–he described his feelings on being chosen to accompany the very first group of 25 K students to experience three months of foreign study in the summer of 1958:

“Wonder of wonders, a thirty-year-old untenured assistant professor of English who had been at K only three years, who had never been to Europe, and whose oral language skills were minimal was selected to take the first group over [on the ship Arosa Star, departing from Montreal on June 17] and give them–what else could he give them–minimal supervision. Plans had been carefully made, but there was simply a lot we just didn’t know. We did know, however, that we were involved in a great adventure, an adventure that had tremendous implications for us and our college. And we knew we had the responsibility for making it work.”

That same year he accompanied the first group of students to study abroad Professor Stavig also was promoted to associate professor English.

He became a full professor in 1963 and served in that capacity until his retirement from K in 1992. And he did much more. In 1962–the year the K-Plan launched as the College’s curriculum–Professor Stavig became K’s first director of foreign study. In this role he established procedures and goals that are still valid today. Five years later he was named dean of off-campus education. He served in both of those posts until 1974.

In 1982, Stavig was awarded the Florence J. Lucasse Fellowship for excellence in teaching, the highest honor for pedagogy, and one conferred by one’s faculty colleagues. Stavig’s speech accepting the award is a study in keen and humble insight into the art of teaching. In the speech he shares 11 observations about the profession of college professor. Among those observations one finds these favorites: “2) Education is life for the students, teachers, and others who are engaged in it. Each of us should, therefore, seek to provide pleasure, satisfaction, rewards, and a sense of worth for all those who participate; 5) Anyone who claims to understand completely what happens in the classroom is either a fool or a liar. Each class, each day, is inevitably a new adventure. Sometimes everything clicks and the world is beautiful; sometimes, for whatever reasons, nothing works and one wonders what sins could possibly have earned such punishment; and 7) The longer I teach, the less concerned I am with supplying good answers and the more concerned I am with asking good questions.”

Rightly considered one of the founders of the K-Plan, Professor Stavig loved, believed in and advocated for the educational leaps that result from foreign study. He credited study abroad in large part to the vision of his friend, English department colleague, and fellow K-Plan architect, Larry Barrett, who also died on an Easter morning. “Larry Barrett saw foreign study as a unique opportunity for us to experiment and innovate,” said Professor Stavig, “to see if a boldly different kind of educational experience could be made to work. And he wanted this because he always wanted education simply to be better for the students.” And so, too, did the man who wrote those words about his friend.

Scott Tempel ’74

cottTempelScott reports that his family is growing, and he’s quite happy about that! “Our granddaughter, Olivia Sage Coetmellec, was born in Paris, France, on April 23, 2016, to our daughter Larissa and her husband Romain Coetmellec.” Shortly thereafter Scott and the rest of his family made their way to Paris for a 10-day stay to bond with the three-week-old Olivia. “She’s a beauty and reminds us so much of Larissa when she was a baby,” wrote Scott. “Shall we say ’deja vu’?” Pictured in a Paris city park are (l-r): Cheryl Tempel, Alex Tempel, Scott, Larissa Tempel Coetmellec (with Olivia) and Romain Coetmellec. Scott is a vice president and engagement leader at Senn Delaney. He earned his bachelor’s degree in psychology and studied abroad in Madrid, Spain.

Mike Paule-Carres ’14

In August Mike and Alex Ducoffe ’13 traveled to Ecuador to celebrate the marriage of Tobi Lobeda and Majo Garson. Mike and Alex know Tobi, a visiting international student who attended Kalamazoo College during the 2011-12 academic year. During the visit the three found time for a hike in the Ecuadorian rain forest. Pictured are (l-r) Alex, Tobi and Mike. “We are all even wearing Kalamazoo College soccer apparel,” wrote Mike. “I think this shows the solidarity of the relationships formed at K and how that K connection is felt in even the far reaches of the world.”

Matt Brynildson ’93

Matt is like Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps? Absolutely, according to “Imbibe” e-magazine. The comparison is apt because Matt is America’s most decorated beer brewer; he’s won awards multiple times in multiple categories at the annual Great American Beer Festival held in Denver, Colorado. In the feature profile, Matt credits his Kalamazoo College experience in a number of ways. His health science major provided the organic chemistry experience that came in handy during his first job after graduating–in the hops lab at Kalsec (Kalamazoo Spice Extraction Company). At K he met K alumnus Larry Bell ’80, whom he credits for getting him interested in craft brewing. Larry is the founder of Bell’s Brewery. And during his K years, Matt studied abroad in Madrid, Spain, which gave him the opportunity to experience the beer cultures in Belgium and Germany. Matt’s brewing career featured early stops at the Siebel Institute (Chicago), Goose Island Brewery (Chicago), and SLO Brewing (Paso Robles, California), which was eventually purchased by Firestone Walker. The firm soon recognized his talent and made Matt a brewery partner in 2010.

Lor Vang ’14

Lor is one of some 550 U.S. undergraduate and graduate students who received a Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) from the U.S. Department of State. CLS participants spend seven to 10 weeks in intensive language institutes in one of 13 countries. Lor spent the summer in China focusing on the study of Chinese language. CLS Program participants are among the more than 40,000 academic and professional exchange program participants supported annually by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs to promote mutual understanding and respect between the people of the United States and the people of other countries.

Joe Brockington, Ph.D., Associate Provost for International Programs

Joe died on August 12, 2015. In addition to his post in the Center for International Programs, he also served as professor of German language and literature.

He earned his B.A., M.A. and Ph.D degrees from Michigan State University, and began his career at Kalamazoo College in 1979 as an instructor in German language and literature. During his 35-year career at K, Joe served in several roles in the Center for International Programs before being named associate provost in 2000. He was recognized internationally as a safety and risk management expert in study abroad programming. During his career he served in various positions of NAFSA: Association of International Educators, including chair of the Section on U.S. Students Abroad and member of the International Education Leadership Knowledge Committee. He also served as a member of the founding board of the Forum on Education Abroad, the Association of International Education Administrators. Joe published and presented numerous papers on modern German literature as well as a variety of study abroad topics, including orientation and re-entry, international programs administration, and campus internationalization. He led best practices workshops in legal and risk management issues and co-edited the third edition of NAFSA’s Guide to Education Abroad for Advisers and Administrators.

“Joe interacted with generations of K students,” said President Eileen B. Wilson-Oyelaran, “and increased their opportunities for independent research and service learning abroad. He was a faithful advocate for international students at K, working with colleagues to ensure a full and productive K educational experience. Joe significantly expanded K’s reputation as a leader in study abroad and international programming. He will be missed by many in the K family and throughout the world.”

In the fall of 2008 Kalamazoo College celebrated its 50th anniversary of sending students abroad. Joe devoted his career to that important educational tradition. Some 80 percent of K students have studied in programs ranging from China and Japan to India and Israel; from Kenya and Senegal in Africa to Ecuador, Costa Rica, Chile, and Mexico in South and Central America. Their options have included European programs in Greece, Hungary, Denmark, Italy, and England as well as the opportunities that have continued (since the program’s origins) in France, Spain, and Germany. Most students study in a foreign language and live with host families. And most participate in an Individualized Cultural Research Project that requires them to get out into a community, participate in a service project, and write a report about the experience. All of that is part of the legacy of Joe Brockington. “The goal,” he once said, “is to help the student look at other cultures, other peoples, and say ‘we’ instead of ‘they.’”