Archives

Judy Bell ’71

Last October Judy was the featured artist at the 37th annual Quilt Show, sponsored by Washington State Quilters. Judy worked for two decades as a family practice physician in California. Her family’s roots trace back to the hills of West Virginia, where one of her grandmothers was a quilter. That fact and occasional visits to quilt museums in New England and Europe during a 40-year span kept her interested in quilting. When she retired in 2006 she started making quilts herself. She uses a long-arm quilting machine, “basically a sewing machine mounted on a big frame.” Judy has taken classes and taught herself the craft by watching videos and reading books. Since her retirement she’s made about 50 quilts. Asked in an interview about her thought process during the making of a quilt, Judy replied, “I think about classical music or Billy Joel or Elton John, because I like to have music on while I’m quilting. But I think about quilting and various patterns and what I’m going to do half the day, because it’s so fascinating to me. I spent my whole professional life being very technical, very scientific, very linear. And there’s a lot of that in quilting. You have to sew a seam and make one point come to another point. But what’s fun is that I can also ask myself, ’Can I try this? What if I do that?’ I couldn’t do that very much when I was in medicine.” Judy’s extensive post-retirement travel has influenced her work. She’s learned about fabric arts in countries such as Mozambique, Tanzania and Nepal. “Quilting has given me a way to connect to the women in those countries,” Judy said. “They may not quilt, but you can still immerse yourself in color and fabric.” Interestingly, Japan is a country where quilting is taking off. Explained Judy: “Japan already had a long tradition of handmade fabrics, but not patchwork quilts. Then the TV series “Little House on the Prairie” was syndicated in Japan about 15 years ago and became wildly popular. Because there were a lot of quilts in the show, reproducing this primitive American art form took over in Japan. Now, the Tokyo International Quilt Festival in January is the biggest quilt show in the world, with a whole section devoted to “Little House on the Prairie”-style quilts made by Japanese women.” Judy matriculated to K from Hillsdale, Michigan. At K, she majored in psychology and studied abroad in Erlangen, Germany.

Laura Fox ’10

Laura is working as a preschool teacher’s aide at Pope John XXIII School of Saint Mary and Saint Nicholas Parishes in Evanston, Ill. She spends her summers teaching drama and music at the American School in Switzerland. Laura is working on her master of teaching (MAT) in elementary education at Northeastern Illinois University.

Jennifer Zeoli ’96

Jennifer  works for the Tweedle Group in Europe. She travels the world (sometimes for work, sometimes on her own) taking pictures and keeping a blog about her adventures. Her photos and postings are amazing. Jennifer writes: “I’m a modern day nomad. When I’m not traveling for work, I explore destinations, both on and off the beaten path, all over the world. I love to experience new cities, cultures, food, adventures… what ever life has, I want to experience it all. My family and friends have often said that they live vicariously through my travels. I want to share these with you and hope you enjoy.” At K Jennifer majored in psychology and studied abroad in Strasbourg, France.

R. Scott Vogel ’84, D.O.

Scott has practiced family medicine in Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, for the past 19 years. He and Beth (Fiore) Vogel ’85 have been married for 29 years, and they have three adult children, all of whom attended (or attend) Kalamazoo College: Harrison ’11, Nikko ’12 and Roderick (Grahm) ’16. “Before moving to Mt. Pleasant, our family lived and went to school in Bavaria,” wrote Scott. “We have since maintained many old and cultivated many new relationships throughout Germany that have enriched our lives in innumerable ways. Kalamazoo College has helped open our minds to these and numerous other experiences. It as truly lived up to its claim of creating a learning environment so that we can be at home in the world.”

Odile Gollé, Kalamazoo College Foreign Study Program in Strasbourg

Madame Gollé, widow of M. Maurice Gollé, who for many years was director of the Kalamazoo College foreign study program in Strasbourg, passed away on October 18, 2015, in Strasbourg at the age of 92. She frequently interacted with and came to know many Kalamazoo students over the years because of her warm, outgoing, and easily approachable personality. She had a wonderful sense of humor and could always be counted on to have an interesting joke or humorous story to relate. She liked to entertain, was an excellent cook (as anyone who enjoyed the hospitality of her home would confirm), and a passionate dog lover. A wonderful wife, mother and friend, she was preceded in death by her husband and one son and is survived by two sons and the deceased son’s wife and their families. (Obituary by Joe Fugate, professor emeritus of German, and director emeritus of foreign study)