Archives

Aaron Maurice Saari ’98

Aaron became the first ordained minister to marry a same-gender couple in Dayton, Ohio. Aaron, who majored in religion at K, is pastor at First Presbyterian Church of Yellow Springs, and he also serves as Multifaith Campus Minister at Sinclair Community College. Aaron did his study abroad in Rome, Italy. He is earning his doctorate in Intercultural Studies at United Theological Seminary. He is pictured (left) with his brother Stephen Allison, who passed away in 2002. Stephen, too, was a K alum, a member of the class of 1995.

Meredith Loomis Quinlan ’12

eredith QuilanMeredith has been named a New Leaders Council—Detroit 2016 Fellow. NLC-D is an entrepreneurial leadership program for progressive young professionals, with a mission to recruit, train and promote the next generation of progressive leaders. Meredith is the director of development and strategic initiatives for Michigan United, a statewide organization fighting for racial, economic and gender justice in Michigan through grassroots organizing. Michigan United’s primary areas of work are fighting for comprehensive immigration reform, ending mass incarceration, promoting equitable development and fighting for an economy that works for all of us. Meredith has organized on campaigns to fight violence against women, increase affordable housing, clean up toxic waste in her local neighborhood, raise Michigan’s minimum wage and increase access to affordable, quality child care and long-term care. She lives in Detroit and loves building campaigns to advance gender equity and women’s rights. At K she earned her degree in human development and social relations and studied abroad in Dakar, Senegal. Her study abroad Intercultural Research Project was a program on HIV-prevention among at-risk Senegalese communities. Her Senior Individualized Project was a documentary on HIV-prevention in Detroit.

Keith Mestrich ’89

Keith is the president and CEO of the Amalgamated Bank – the nation’s only union-owned bank and the leading financial institution for the nation’s progressive community. Keith is a 25-year veteran of the labor movement, beginning his career as a researcher at the AFL-CIO. In that position he gained experience assisting unions on hundreds of organizing, bargaining and political campaigns. In 2002 Keith went to work for UNITE, the bank’s majority shareholder, where he served in various capacities. He first joined Amalgamated in June of 2012, initially directing the bank’s Washington Region and coordinating the bank’s operations in the nation’s capital. He has more than a quarter century of experience working with the bank’s core constituencies in the labor movement and non-profit organizations. Keith is currently on the board of directors and serves as treasurer of the Union Health Center in New York City, the Public Utility Law Project, and the DC Employment Justice Center. He is also on the board of directors of the National Consumers League and serves as an adviser to The Workers Lab. He also serves on the board of directors of the Democracy Alliance, which provides opportunities for individuals to leverage their progressive philanthropy by connecting their efforts with those of other investors/donors, organizations, political strategists and leaders. At K Keith earned his degree in political science and studied abroad in Strasbourg, France.

Arianna Schindle ’08

Arianna is an educator, organizer and healer who works for Rhizacollective.org, a women-led collective of cultural workers and facilitators that uses storytelling, healing, organizing and research to support social transformation and environmental justice. Arianna has worked in a variety of settings across the U.S., Asia and Central America ranging from urban public schools, mental health clinics, nonprofit organizations, worker’s centers and labor unions to private and public foundations. She conducts workshops on the trauma of oppression, community organizing and creative campaigning. At K Arianna majored in psychology and studied abroad in Thailand . She received her graduate certificates in urban public health and clinical social work at Hunter College.

James Pollock ’04, Ph.D.

James accepted a position as a psychologist at Columbia University (New York City). His clinical competencies include individual psychotherapy for mood and anxiety disorders, identity issues, LGBTQ mental health, and behavioral health issues. He has extensive experience in addictions treatment, and he works with clients to develop individualized substance use treatment plans. At K he majored in psychology and studied abroad in Bonn, Germany. He earned his Ph.D. at New York University.

Adam Marshall ’11

Adam is the Jack Nelson Freedom of Information legal fellow for the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, a nonprofit association dedicated to providing free legal assistance to journalists. He is spending his fellowship year working on freedom of information and access issues and on tutorials for the Reporters Committee’s “iFOIA” system for sending and tracking Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests. Adam graduated from George Washington University Law School last May. During law school, he volunteered for the Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project, worked as a research assistant, and served as the president of the university’s ACLU student group. He also served as an associate for the GW International Law Review. Before joining the Reporters Committee, Adam interned at the Electronic Privacy Information Center and the National Whistleblowers Center. At K he earned his bachelor’s degree (magna cum laude) in political science, and he studied abroad at the London School of Economics.

Analyst and Activist

Since coming to Kalamazoo College in 2011 Lisa Brock has served a dual role. As academic director of the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership, she helps “teachers” (which includes professors, certainly, but also all persons involved in a student’s learning experience at K) think about the ways academic content and social justice can work together. From this work will grow new courses and new programs infused with scholarly rigor and social justice principles. As a result, K students will develop and cultivate throughout their lives the critical thinking skills, the leadership acumen, and the inclination to help build a better world for all. Brock also is an associate professor of history, and her favorite class to teach focuses on Nelson Mandela and the anti-apartheid movement. She has taught courses on this subject for many years, even before the fall of apartheid and Mandela’s release from Robben Island (1990). Her work in social justice and history reinforce one another. An education so infused with social justice that the learner seeks to make a better world may sound utopian. But Brock the historian, and Brock the activist, knows it is possible. BeLight is delighted to help you get to know Lisa Brock in its February 2015 “Lighten Up” interview.

What is the best song ever recorded?

I love Billie Holiday, the pain in her voice makes every song memorable, but the best ever recorded is Aretha Franklin’s “Respect.”

What’s your favorite childhood fairy tale or story?

I don’t recall its title, but my mom used to read me a story about a man who dropped his glasses in black ink, put them back on, and proceeded to move about the world even though he couldn’t see. Maybe it was called “The Man With Ink Glasses.”

If Heaven exists, what would you like to hear God say when you arrive at the pearly gates?

I hope to hear ‘Here are your folk.’ And there, waiting for me, would be my mom and grandparents, my sister and uncles.

What’s your favorite word?

Analysis.

What’s your least favorite word?

Illness.

What turns you on?

Social justice.

What turns you off?

Profiteering.

What sound do you love?

Children laughing.

What sound do you hate?

A person yelling at another person.

What profession other than yours would you like to attempt?

A composer. I liked writing songs and enjoyed my music theory classes in college.

What profession would you not like to participate in?

I’d never want to be a bureaucrat buried in the bowels of a corporation.

What’s been a great moment in your liberal arts learning?

Reading people like Karl Marx and Frantz Fanon when I was an undergraduate.

Who’s the person (living or dead) with whom you’d most like to spend a lunch hour?

Zora Neale Hurston, a writer during the Harlem Renaissance and author of Their Eyes Were Watching God. She also was an accomplished anthropologist, despite having her work marginalized because she was a woman. She studied with Franz Boas. Alice Walker played a role in the re-discovery of this fascinating writer and feminist hero.

What memory from childhood still surprises you?

My parents married young enough to ensure a great deal of grandparent hovering, so I remember enjoying lots of love from my extended family. I took that for granted and was shocked when my first college roommate, who had a very different childhood experience than mine, once told me that she didn’t like her mother. I lost sleep over that. The other thing that surprises me is how childhood is like a snapshot, so temporal. All old photos whisper impermanence. But when we’re children we often think things will always stay the same. Maybe that’s the memory from childhood that still surprises me: that I once could have thought that way.

What is your favorite curse word?

M—– F—–

What is your favorite hobby?

I’m an avid reader and a big fan of mysteries. Lately I’ve taken up listening to mystery novels as audio books. Unfortunately I often fall asleep, and the audio continues for up to an hour, which means I’m quite lost when I resume listening.

What is your favorite comedy movie?

The British version of Death at a Funeral.

What local, regional, national, or world event has affected you most?

There are two, and both are positive. One was the campaign and election of Harold Washington as mayor of Chicago. I worked on his campaign. And the other was the culmination of the anti-apartheid campaign (I was an activist in that movement as well) with the release of Nelson Mandela on February 11, 1990. Millions of people around the world “gathered” to be part of that moment. I remember many friends came together at my house at 3 a.m. in Chicago. We were making breakfast, talking excitedly, anticipating that great hopeful moment.

Caroline Barnett ’15

Caroline has joined the Sojourners yearlong Christian discipleship internship program in Washington, D.C., working as an editorial assistant on Sojourners Magazine, which provides commentary, news, and analysis from a faith perspective, interviews with those on the forefront of theological and justice-oriented study, culture reviews, inspiration, and more. Sojourners envisions a future in which Christians put their faith into action in the passionate pursuit of social justice, peace and environmental stewardship, working in partnership with people of other perspectives, for the common good of communities, families and individuals. At K, Caroline majored in anthropology and sociology and studied abroad in Dakar, Senegal. She served in the Chapel’s Interfaith Student Leaders program, and an article on that endeavor appeared in the October BeLight.