Archives

Kristian Bjørnard ’03

Kristian is a new faculty member at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA), where he will teach courses in advanced design, interactive media and graphic design. Kristian is a designer, thinker and “sustainabilitist.” He is the director of “The Office of Kristian Bjørnard,” a design studio focused on publishing in all its forms. Kristian holds an MFA in graphic design from MICA; he earned his bachelor’s degree in art at Kalamazoo College. The artist nearly became an engineer. His exploration of physics and mathematics filtered through the lenses of painting and drawing led Kristian to graphic design. Current research includes “sustainable graphic design” and new publishing utilities. This has resulted in various “sustainable” aesthetic exercises, a more purposeful interest into systems, exploring reusable processes, a focus on rules-based design concepts, and investigating vernacular design methodologies. Kristian keeps abreast of current web trends, standards, and technologies, and explores time and motion in both digital and print media. His myriad interests make for interesting insights and connections among science, philosophy and the practice of design—-both in the classroom and in his professional practice.

Jim Brown ’87

Jim has been promoted from associate professor to full professor of physics at Wabash College. He earned his B.A. in physics at K and studied abroad in Hannover, Germany. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Michigan. Jim has taught at Wabash since 2003. And he won Wabash’s highest teaching honor in 2012. He has served in important leadership roles in the physics department, across the college, and in the scientific community, including as a science policy fellow at the National Science Foundation and as the director of MoNA (the Modular Neutron Array) project. He is the author or co-author of 80 peer-reviewed publications. Jim is currently on sabbatical at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. He is doing research on the nuclear structure of the most neutron-rich nuclei achievable in order to understand the limits of stability of nuclei with vastly more neutrons than protons.

Bethany Gross ’10

Bethany is a coauthor of the article “Evaluation of 3D Printing and its Potential Impact on Biotechnology and the Chemical Sciences,” published in Analytical Chemistry in January. Nearing 30 years since its introduction, 3D printing technology is set to revolutionize research and teaching laboratories. The article encompasses the history of 3D printing, reviews various printing methods, and presents current applications. The authors offer an appraisal of the future direction and impact the technology will have on laboratory settings as 3D printers become more accessible. Gross’s research at Michigan State University encompasses the development of a flow-based 3D printed microfluidic device with integrated electrodes to initiate and evaluate injury-induced blood-clot formation.

Dennis Lamb ’63

Dennis and his wife, Pat, recently moved from University Park, Pennsylvania, to Fort Collins, Colorado. It may have been weather related, albeit not in the way one might think. Dennis may have been seeking more exciting weather. He majored in physics at K and did his senior thesis on thunderstorms, which marked the beginning of a career in weather. He joined the meteorology department at Penn State in 1986 and retired as a full professor in 2008. The following two years he spent writing a book on the Physics and Chemistry of Clouds. Now comes the recent move to Fort Collins. According to class agent Don Schneider, Dennis confessed that the weather in central Pennsylvania was seldom to his liking (not enough thunderstorms?). Dennis did a winter sabbatical in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and loved all the snow. He and Pat have a cottage on Crystal Lake near Benzonia, Michigan, where they can be found a few weeks every summer. You can reach Dennis at lno@psu.edu.

Robert Herman ’45

Bob died on August 21, 2015. He earned his bachelor’s degree in physics and mathematics at K, and he earned a master’s degree in physics from the University of Michigan. In 1947, he began his career in various research and management positions at the U.S. Naval Ordinance Test Station in China Lake, California. In 1959, Bob made the decision to use the computer and engineering skills he developed while working for the Navy to create his unique, high speed magnetic core computer. He made the decision to resign from his civil-service position and moved his family to Orange County. He formed Orange County’s first home grown computer company, Decision Control, Inc. of Newport Beach. His highly successful company merged with Varian Associates, Inc. Bob left Varian to launch numerous other high-tech companies. He enjoyed skiing, sailing, flying, hiking and traveling with his family. He is survived by his wife, children, and grandchildren.

Jeff Hsi ’83

, Tuesday, September 6, 2016, in Dexter, Mich. (Junfu Han | The Ann Arbor News)

Jeff delivered the keynote address at last month’s Convocation ceremony. His story is a K-Plan tale of two distinguished careers. His significant achievements as a medicinal chemist and as a patent attorney–indeed the adroitness with which he made that career change–he attributed in part to his Kalamazoo College experience. At K he majored in chemistry. After graduate school (M.S., Indiana University; Ph.D., University of Michigan) and a postdoctoral fellowship (University of South Carolina), Jeff went to work as a senior scientist in cardiovascular diseases at a multinational pharmaceutical company. While he was a working scientist and inventor (he holds several patents) he became intrigued by patent law and intellectual property law and decided to make a career change. He earned his J.D. from Rutgers University School of Law (1997) and since then has worked for several prestigious law firms and served as in-house counsel for a biopharmaceutical start-up company. Jeff is an internationally invited speaker on various intellectual property issues, and he has lectured at the Harvard Extension School and at MIT Sloan School of Management. Jeff also is a dedicated volunteer for various nonprofit organizations. He was a member of the board of trustees at Kalamazoo College and is currently serving as a board member for Asian Americans Advancing Justice–AAJC (Asian American Justice Center) in Washington, D.C.– where he chairs the Policy and Programs Committee. Today Jeff is a shareholder at the intellectual property law firm of Wolf Greenfield. His legal experience is wide-ranging, from preparing and prosecuting patent applications in numerous scientific areas to establishing licensing and research and development collaboration agreements.

Michael Korn ’14

Michael was awarded a 2014 David S. Bruce Outstanding Undergraduate Abstract Award from the American Physiological Society. Michael did a research internship in a muscle physiology laboratory. That work became the basis of his Senior Individualized Project: “The protective effects of simvastatin on muscle in a rat model of chronic rotator cuff injury.” Winter term was a good one for awards for Michael. He also was one of the College’s Senior Leadership Award winners.

Cliff Van Eaton ’72

Author Cliff Van Eaton holds his bookA book by Cliff has been named a finalist in the 2015 Royal Society of New Zealand Science Book Prize. Manuka: The Biography of an Extraordinary Honey, is the ‘rags-to-riches’ tale of how a piece of scientific serendipity turned an unwanted honey into a ground-breaking medicine. The Royal Society of New Zealand is modeled on the original Royal Society in England, the oldest continuing academy of sciences in the world. An important function of the Society is the sharing of science-based ideas in the overall New Zealand community, and the Book Prize is a way of celebrating the efforts of writers and publishers in that regard. The competition is held every two years, and is open to all books by New Zealand authors that “communicate scientific concepts in an interesting and readable way for a general audience.” The judges noted that “manuka honey is a uniquely New Zealand product, valued here and internationally for its rich taste and therapeutic properties.” They went on to write, “… this delightful and surprising book … tells the captivating story of the science behind the discovery of the antibiotic effects of manuka honey, with a focus on the scientists and beekeepers who have brought this product to the world.” Cliff is a well-known writer on beekeeping subjects and is co-author of two books on bee diseases. For more than 30 years he worked as a beekeeper adviser in New Zealand, and has also assisted beekeepers in countries as diverse as the Solomon Islands, Uruguay, and Vietnam. This is his first foray into popular non-fiction. Manuka: The Biography of an Extraordinary Honey is now on sale in bookstores in New Zealand, Australia, and the United Kingdom. The book is also available in the United States through Amazon.

Matt Brynildson ’93

Matt is like Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps? Absolutely, according to “Imbibe” e-magazine. The comparison is apt because Matt is America’s most decorated beer brewer; he’s won awards multiple times in multiple categories at the annual Great American Beer Festival held in Denver, Colorado. In the feature profile, Matt credits his Kalamazoo College experience in a number of ways. His health science major provided the organic chemistry experience that came in handy during his first job after graduating–in the hops lab at Kalsec (Kalamazoo Spice Extraction Company). At K he met K alumnus Larry Bell ’80, whom he credits for getting him interested in craft brewing. Larry is the founder of Bell’s Brewery. And during his K years, Matt studied abroad in Madrid, Spain, which gave him the opportunity to experience the beer cultures in Belgium and Germany. Matt’s brewing career featured early stops at the Siebel Institute (Chicago), Goose Island Brewery (Chicago), and SLO Brewing (Paso Robles, California), which was eventually purchased by Firestone Walker. The firm soon recognized his talent and made Matt a brewery partner in 2010.

Peter Erdi, the Luce Professor of Complex Systems Studies

In September Peter delivered the 2016 lecture at the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science. The title of his talk was “Complex Systems Perspective in Neuroscience–historical and current approaches.” It provided a general perspective of various approaches of neuroscience systems to an understanding of the complexity of the brain. Peter also is the head of the Theoretical Neuroscience and Complex Systems Group at the Wigner Research Centre for Physics, a research institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. And he is the founding co-director of the Budapest Semester in Cognitive Science study abroad program. Peter is a highly regarding computational neuroscientist with a background in chemical cybernetics.