Archives

Kate Markiewicz ’04

Kate has been named a senior fellow by the Knowles Science Teaching Foundation. KSTF fellowships support teachers of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Kate teaches at Boston Latin School in Boston, Mass. She graduated from K with a B.A. in chemistry and physics. She studied ion-selective electrodes in Kalamazoo, modeled solar coronal loops at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC, and worked with graduate students in a chemistry lab in Erlangen, Germany.

Kate moved to Boston to pursue graduate work in chemistry at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). During her first year there, Kate worked as a teaching assistant. “Working with students was extremely rewarding and was what I enjoyed most.” Kate left MIT to work as a substitute teacher in the Boston Public School System and as head coach for the Boston Latin School Science Olympiad team. “I discovered that high school students were a lot of fun.”

Kate completed her master’s degree in education through the Boston Teacher Residency and the University of Massachusetts-Boston and began teaching full time at Boston Latin School in 2007. Kate has presented the results of her teacher research at the 2008, 2009, and 2010 National Science Teachers Association Conferences in Boston, New Orleans and Philadelphia, respectively.

J. Peter Coppinger ’99

Peter is an associate professor of biology at the Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, Indiana. Peter’s research interests include plant-microbe interactions and identification of phytoplasma in wildflowers. He teaches courses in cell and molecular biology, genetics, industrial microbiology, and plant biology. Peter earned his bachelor’s degree in biology and studied abroad in Aberdeen Scotland. After he graduated from K he was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship and studied rainforest ecophysiology at Macquarie Univeristy in Sydney, Australia. He earned his Ph.D. in plant biology at the University of California at Berkeley.

Samantha Wolfe ’13

Samantha recently served as an AmeriCorps New Jersey watershed ambassador working in the Assicunk, Crosswicks and Doctors Creek watersheds. “I hosted a volunteer monitoring training at the Tulpehaking Nature Center, with eight volunteers,” she is quoted as saying. “We spend many hours together. It had gone so well that I was on cloud nine at the end of the training. I’m so grateful for the time I have spent in New Jersey.” Samantha’s comments were part of the state’s Department of Environmental Protection’s effort to recruit Americorps watershed ambassadors for 2016. Samantha majored in biology at Kalamazoo College and studied abroad in Beijing, China.

Genevieve Leet ’11

Genevieve is a graduate student at the University of Michigan’s School of Natural Resources & Environment. She’s working on a dual-track master’s degree in both “Behavior, Education, and Communication” and “Conservation Ecology.” Her new job as curator’s assistant at the Art and Environment Gallery gives her a chance to exercise her passion for painting and the outdoors.

 

Kristian Bjørnard ’03

Kristian is a new faculty member at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA), where he will teach courses in advanced design, interactive media and graphic design. Kristian is a designer, thinker and “sustainabilitist.” He is the director of “The Office of Kristian Bjørnard,” a design studio focused on publishing in all its forms. Kristian holds an MFA in graphic design from MICA; he earned his bachelor’s degree in art at Kalamazoo College. The artist nearly became an engineer. His exploration of physics and mathematics filtered through the lenses of painting and drawing led Kristian to graphic design. Current research includes “sustainable graphic design” and new publishing utilities. This has resulted in various “sustainable” aesthetic exercises, a more purposeful interest into systems, exploring reusable processes, a focus on rules-based design concepts, and investigating vernacular design methodologies. Kristian keeps abreast of current web trends, standards, and technologies, and explores time and motion in both digital and print media. His myriad interests make for interesting insights and connections among science, philosophy and the practice of design—-both in the classroom and in his professional practice.

Bethany Gross ’10

Bethany is a coauthor of the article “Evaluation of 3D Printing and its Potential Impact on Biotechnology and the Chemical Sciences,” published in Analytical Chemistry in January. Nearing 30 years since its introduction, 3D printing technology is set to revolutionize research and teaching laboratories. The article encompasses the history of 3D printing, reviews various printing methods, and presents current applications. The authors offer an appraisal of the future direction and impact the technology will have on laboratory settings as 3D printers become more accessible. Gross’s research at Michigan State University encompasses the development of a flow-based 3D printed microfluidic device with integrated electrodes to initiate and evaluate injury-induced blood-clot formation.

Dennis Lamb ’63

Dennis and his wife, Pat, recently moved from University Park, Pennsylvania, to Fort Collins, Colorado. It may have been weather related, albeit not in the way one might think. Dennis may have been seeking more exciting weather. He majored in physics at K and did his senior thesis on thunderstorms, which marked the beginning of a career in weather. He joined the meteorology department at Penn State in 1986 and retired as a full professor in 2008. The following two years he spent writing a book on the Physics and Chemistry of Clouds. Now comes the recent move to Fort Collins. According to class agent Don Schneider, Dennis confessed that the weather in central Pennsylvania was seldom to his liking (not enough thunderstorms?). Dennis did a winter sabbatical in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and loved all the snow. He and Pat have a cottage on Crystal Lake near Benzonia, Michigan, where they can be found a few weeks every summer. You can reach Dennis at lno@psu.edu.

Robert Herman ’45

Bob died on August 21, 2015. He earned his bachelor’s degree in physics and mathematics at K, and he earned a master’s degree in physics from the University of Michigan. In 1947, he began his career in various research and management positions at the U.S. Naval Ordinance Test Station in China Lake, California. In 1959, Bob made the decision to use the computer and engineering skills he developed while working for the Navy to create his unique, high speed magnetic core computer. He made the decision to resign from his civil-service position and moved his family to Orange County. He formed Orange County’s first home grown computer company, Decision Control, Inc. of Newport Beach. His highly successful company merged with Varian Associates, Inc. Bob left Varian to launch numerous other high-tech companies. He enjoyed skiing, sailing, flying, hiking and traveling with his family. He is survived by his wife, children, and grandchildren.

Michael Korn ’14

Michael was awarded a 2014 David S. Bruce Outstanding Undergraduate Abstract Award from the American Physiological Society. Michael did a research internship in a muscle physiology laboratory. That work became the basis of his Senior Individualized Project: “The protective effects of simvastatin on muscle in a rat model of chronic rotator cuff injury.” Winter term was a good one for awards for Michael. He also was one of the College’s Senior Leadership Award winners.