Archives

Lloyd Burns ’50

Lloyd died on February 19, 2014, after a long illness. He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., grew up in Garden City, N.Y., and graduated from Kalamazoo College with a degree in physics. He spent two years in the United States Army Chemical Corp. He worked as an engineer for General Electric’s nuclear energy division for 37 years as well as an additional 10 years after retirement.

Andrew Carroll ’09

Andrew is the founder of Sweetology Dessert Shop (“The Science of Delicious Desserts”) and supplies a wonderful bio on the firm’s website: It reads: “I’ve always had a sweet tooth. Given the choice, I’m always drawn to the sweet over savory. If I could eat desserts 3 meals a day, I would be one very happy man. As a kid I could always be found in the kitchen when my Mom was baking, waiting to fight off my sister Kelly for the first crack at licking a beater or stealing cookie dough. Things didn’t change as I grew up, and my affinity for desserts only heightened. After completing my bachelor’s degree in chemistry and biochemistry from Kalamazoo College, I bummed around awhile not quite sure what to do with my life. Then came the answer in the form of a neighborhood bakery in Rocky River, Ohio. I spent years there learning and cultivating the professional side of what had always been a beloved hobby. It perfectly married my love of science and my love of confections. In 2014 I experimented with my first handcrafted marshmallow, and it was love at first taste. Since that time, I have devoted all of my time and energy to perfecting my craft. Constant innovation, experimentation and commitment to quality ingredients and flavors drives me. Being able to make others happy through my creations, well that is just the icing on the cake.”

 

Jeffrey Hsi ’83, Ph.D.

Jeff has joined the Boston-based intellectual property law firm Wolf, Greenfield & Sacks, P.C. as a shareholder. Jeff has nearly two decades of experience in corporate counseling, formation and execution of intellectual property strategy and patent prosecution and opinion work in the areas of chemistry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, health and beauty, agriculture, animal health, nutraceuticals, polymers, diagnostics and medical devices. He also advises on the development of intellectual property, and he is experienced in establishing infrastructure for it. He has counseled multinational chemical and pharmaceutical companies, emerging biopharmaceutical companies, venture capital and financial institutions and academic and governmental research institutions throughout the world. Jeff majored in chemistry at K and studied abroad in Erlangen, Germany. He earned his M.S. (chemistry) from Indiana University, his Ph.D. (biochemistry) from the University of Michigan and his law degree from Rutgers University. He is a co-inventor on two U.S. patents and co-author of several scientific publications.

John Grandin ’63

On a recent trip to Florida from Rhode Island, John and his wife, Carol, stopped in Atlanta and had a great two-day visit with Dick Compans ’63 and his wife, Marian. John is professor emeritus of German and director emeritus of the International Engineering Program at the University of Rhode Island. Dick is professor of microbiology and immunology in the Emory University School of Medicine. He also directs the Influenza Pathogenesis & Immunology Research Center.

 

Michael Finkler ’91

Mike was the elder statesman, so to speak, of several generations of Kalamazoo College biology majors who attended the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. Pictured with Mike (far left) are (l-r): Sarah Bouchard ’95, associate professor of biology, Otterbein University; Claire Riggs ’11, graduate student in the department of biology at Portland State University; Wendy Reed ’92, associate professor and chair of biological sciences, North Dakota State University; Eddy Price ’99, post-doctoral fellow, Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin; Alan Faber ’14, biology major at K; and Ed Dzialowski ’93, associate professor and associate chair of biological sciences, University of North Texas.

Dan Blustein ’06

Dan is the subject of “Member Spotlight” for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The article (by Laura Petersen) is titled “Dan Blustein journeys from marine biology to Hollywood and back again,” and it’s a good read, chronicling his interesting forays in the saga explicit in the title–though “back again” might more accurately refer to “marine robotics” rather than marine biology. Of particular note is the reference to Dan’s opportunities in K’s externship program. Those two experiences, one with octopi at the Seattle Aquarium and the other job-shadowing a physician, helped clarify what he wanted to do. Of course the article showcases that Dan’s path has been more spiral than straight line. How cool (and liberal arts!) is that.

Michael R. Johnson ’06

ichaelJohnsonMike recently authored a geology and paleontology guide of southern Colorado. That’s a great story, and Mike tells it best. During the summer of 2015 he did an internship with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) through the Geological Society of America’s GeoCorps program. “I was based in Canon City, Colorado, near both the Royal Gorge and several dinosaur quarries (so basically paradise),” he wrote.  “My mentor had funding to write a book (for the BLM’s “Junior Explorer” series) that detailed the geology and paleontology of southern Colorado.  So we teamed up with Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument; they paired me with another intern who had experience as an illustrator; and we went and wrote a book!”  The book covers seven sites of historical and/or geologic importance along the Gold Belt National Scenic Byway so that kids on vacation with their parents can go to these sites after or while reading about them.  Along the way, the book teaches geologic time, paleontology, how to recognize common types of rock, and how geologists interpret the rock record.

“Writing this thing was a lot of fun.  Although there were some general guidelines for the book series that we had to follow, the activities and content were entirely up to us!  And of course we had to go to all those places in person so that we’d know exactly what visitors would be able to see, and how each site might fit with our educational goals.  The reception for the book has been fantastic as well.  Not only were our mentors impressed at how quickly we put together a good product, but everyone outside of our group who has seen it has been impressed.  The State Paleontologist for Wyoming (admittedly a friend of mine) told me that he wants his office to put out books like that.”

Mike and his illustrator and field partner (an undergraduate at Northern Arizona University) presented their book at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Baltimore in early December.

At K, Mike majored in biology and studied abroad in Wollongong, Australia. He earned his master’s degree at the University of Wyoming and is currently in a Ph.D. program at the University of Wisconsin (Madison). “Mike is an excellent example of someone who has pursued his passion,” wrote Associate Professor of Biology Ann Fraser.  “I first met him when he was a sophomore in 2003, and even back then he was enthralled by paleontology.”