Archives

Kate Markiewicz ’04

Kate has been named a senior fellow by the Knowles Science Teaching Foundation. KSTF fellowships support teachers of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Kate teaches at Boston Latin School in Boston, Mass. She graduated from K with a B.A. in chemistry and physics. She studied ion-selective electrodes in Kalamazoo, modeled solar coronal loops at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC, and worked with graduate students in a chemistry lab in Erlangen, Germany.

Kate moved to Boston to pursue graduate work in chemistry at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). During her first year there, Kate worked as a teaching assistant. “Working with students was extremely rewarding and was what I enjoyed most.” Kate left MIT to work as a substitute teacher in the Boston Public School System and as head coach for the Boston Latin School Science Olympiad team. “I discovered that high school students were a lot of fun.”

Kate completed her master’s degree in education through the Boston Teacher Residency and the University of Massachusetts-Boston and began teaching full time at Boston Latin School in 2007. Kate has presented the results of her teacher research at the 2008, 2009, and 2010 National Science Teachers Association Conferences in Boston, New Orleans and Philadelphia, respectively.

Bethany Gross ’10

Bethany is a coauthor of the article “Evaluation of 3D Printing and its Potential Impact on Biotechnology and the Chemical Sciences,” published in Analytical Chemistry in January. Nearing 30 years since its introduction, 3D printing technology is set to revolutionize research and teaching laboratories. The article encompasses the history of 3D printing, reviews various printing methods, and presents current applications. The authors offer an appraisal of the future direction and impact the technology will have on laboratory settings as 3D printers become more accessible. Gross’s research at Michigan State University encompasses the development of a flow-based 3D printed microfluidic device with integrated electrodes to initiate and evaluate injury-induced blood-clot formation.

Michael Korn ’14

Michael was awarded a 2014 David S. Bruce Outstanding Undergraduate Abstract Award from the American Physiological Society. Michael did a research internship in a muscle physiology laboratory. That work became the basis of his Senior Individualized Project: “The protective effects of simvastatin on muscle in a rat model of chronic rotator cuff injury.” Winter term was a good one for awards for Michael. He also was one of the College’s Senior Leadership Award winners.

Lloyd Burns ’50

Lloyd died on February 19, 2014, after a long illness. He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., grew up in Garden City, N.Y., and graduated from Kalamazoo College with a degree in physics. He spent two years in the United States Army Chemical Corp. He worked as an engineer for General Electric’s nuclear energy division for 37 years as well as an additional 10 years after retirement.

Michael Finkler ’91

Mike was the elder statesman, so to speak, of several generations of Kalamazoo College biology majors who attended the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. Pictured with Mike (far left) are (l-r): Sarah Bouchard ’95, associate professor of biology, Otterbein University; Claire Riggs ’11, graduate student in the department of biology at Portland State University; Wendy Reed ’92, associate professor and chair of biological sciences, North Dakota State University; Eddy Price ’99, post-doctoral fellow, Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin; Alan Faber ’14, biology major at K; and Ed Dzialowski ’93, associate professor and associate chair of biological sciences, University of North Texas.

Andy Cole ’07

Andy was named Client Solutions Director for Interaction Associates. The firm specializes in global consulting and training innovation; Andy will work in its Boston, Mass., office. Before joining IA Andy co-created two successful businesses in the innovation and technology marketplace. His background also includes product development in aerospace with Google, non-emissive fuels with the EPA, neuroscience with the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and Technology, energy efficiency with the Environmental Defense Fund, and renewable energy with Vestas Wind Systems. Andy was a 3-2 engineering major at Kalamazoo College. He earned a B.A. in physics from K, and he earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan. He earned an M.B.A. in entrepreneurial leadership from Babson College (Wellesley, Mass.)

Brett Blaauw ’05

Brett co-authored a paper that appeared in the Journal of Applied Ecology. According to paper’s other co-author, Rufus Isaacs, theirs is the first paper that demonstrates an economic advantage for farmers when they create wild bee habitat next to cultivated fields. The two entomologists planted marginal land surrounding blueberry fields with a mix of native perennial wildflowers. Even though the fields were pollinated by honey bees trucked in for the purpose, Brett discovered that, after a period of two years, the rising population of wild bees increased blueberry yields by 10 to 20 percent. That increase more than offset the costs of making the marginal land attractive to wild bee populations. Brett was the lead author on the paper. The K biology major completed his Ph.D. at Michigan State University under Isaacs and is now working at Rutgers University.