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Kathryn Fox ’77

Kathryn FoxKate was one of three recipients of the Ashley Brooks-Danso Memorial Fund Student Travel Scholarships for the Council on Social Work Education’s annual program meeting last year. The gathering is the premier national meeting in the social work education field. More than 2,500 social work educators, administrators, practitioners, students, and other key decision makers from across the country and around the world attended, making it the largest gathering of its kind. Kate’s scholarship was awarded through the CSWE National Center for Gerontological Social Work Education. A Master in Social Work (MSW) student at the University at Albany, Kate was accepted into the competitive Internships In Aging Project (IAP), which is conducted in partnership with community consortium agencies and offers the opportunity to specialize in services to aging persons. IAP is part of the Geriatric Social Work Practicum Program, which was begun by the John A. Hartford Foundation and coordinated by the New York Academy of Medicine, now called the Hartford Partnership Programs for Aging Education. The goal of the program is to address the critical need for geriatric social workers.

Tom Hennes ’78

Tom is working on the $150 million expansion and renovation of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, scheduled for completion in 2020. Tom is founder of Thinc Design, a New York City-based firm that has provided exhibit designs for clients worldwide, including the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York, the USA Pavilion at the 2015 Milan Expo, and the Steinhart Aquarium at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. The Detroit-area native moved to New York City to become a theater designer after graduating from K with a B.A. degree in German. His assignment in Cleveland includes moving the Perkins Center from the north to the south side of the institution’s complex in University Circle, plus creating interior displays in the new main exhibit wing.

Laura Newland ’03

Laura is the executive director of the District of Columbia Office on Aging (DCOA). She leads an agency that develops and carries out a comprehensive and coordinated system of health, education, employment and social services for the District’s older adults, persons living with disabilities and their caregivers. Prior to her appointment by Mayor Muriel Bowser, Laura served as DCOA’s interim general counsel. She was appointed interim executive director in early November and named executive director in December. She has deep professional roots in advocacy. Prior to joining District government, Laura worked at AARP Legal Counsel for the Elderly directing the Real Property Tax Project. She spearheaded the community advocacy and litigation strategy that led to significant legislative reform in 2014 and the creation of the Real Property Tax Lien Ombudsman. Before receiving her law degree (Georgetown University), she worked in a variety of nonprofit settings, spanning numerous issues that included domestic violence, jail-based voting and registration, and consumer protection. At K she earned her bachelor’s degree in political science and studied abroad in Thailand.

Matt Longjohn ’93, M.D.

Matt is the chief health officer at the National Council of YMCAs, which received in 2012 a federal grant of $12 million to test the value of a diabetes prevention program in eight states. In March of this year Matt was a member of a group that traveled to Washington D.C. to share an evaluation of the program. The results were excellent, showing both cost reduction and diabetes prevention. Based on those results the Obama administration is expected to expand Medicare to cover diabetes prevention programs among people at high risk of developing the disease, an expansion made possible by the Affordable Care Act.

Gretchen Eick ’64, Ph.D.

Gretchen recently received a Fulbright Fellowship (her third), which she will use to teach in Bosnia next year. Gretchen is the author of the four books, Dissent in Wichita: The Civil Rights Movement in the Midwest, 1954-72 ; Herstories: Woman to Woman ; Maybe Crossings; and Finding Duncan. At K Gretchen majored in history and studied abroad in Sierra Leone.

Paul Joseph Carpenter ’49

Paul died on March 6, 2014. He served with the U.S. Navy in the Pacific theater during World War II, and his war experiences precipitated his lifelong advocacy for peace and justice. After the war he graduated earned his B.A. in sociology from K and then earned his Master of Divinity degree from Union Theological Seminary in New York City. His thesis advisor there was the noted theologian Reinhold Niebuhr. Paul was ordained in the Community Baptist Church of Montgomery Center, Vermont in 1954. He also served American Baptist churches in Cleveland and Norwalk, Ohio. He was granted standing in the Congregational Church (known today as the United Church of Christ) in 1962, and he served UCC churches in Parkman, Brecksville, and Youngstown, Ohio, where he was instrumental in establishing a chapter of Habitat For Humanity. At the age of 55 Carpenter returned to school, achieving a master’s degree in community counseling. He concluded his career ministering successfully to persons suffering with mental illness in the Youngstown community.

Paloma Clohossey ’11

Paloma works for the U.S. Department of State as an information officer on the organization’s foreign disaster assistance response team. She is based out of Washington, D.C. and has an apartment there. She has been in Liberia and Sierra Leone for most of the past 10 months working on the Ebola response. The photo shows her in Liberia crossing the river from Bong County to Gbarpolu County to visit a community care center. She still had a hour hike once she hit the shore. She writes a blog about her work.

Recently Paloma wrote her alma mater about one of those K connection moments she experienced in Africa. “Do you remember Deogratias ’Deo’ Niyizonkiza, who spoke at Kalamazoo during the Spring of 2011? Wanted to tell you that I met the co-founder of Deo’s organization, Village Health Works,–Dziwe Ntaba–here in Liberia, Dziwe accompanied Deo to Kalamazoo and remembers receiving a cozy. big black K sweatshirt. He is here as an employee of the NGO International Medical Corps that we (USAID) have funded and that has contributed an amazing amount to the Ebola response.”

Paloma also visits Kenya whenever she can. She did her K study abroad in Nairobi and returned to the country for her SIP. During those sojourns she got to know seven children whose education and care she continues to support. “I’ve been granted two weeks leave to fly to Kenya to spend with the seven kiddos,” she wrote last June. “They remain my personal priority–I still speak to them every few weeks and they are growing fast. They are doing well, studying hard, and I can’t wait to hug them for a few weeks.”

Myra Selby ’77

President Barack Obama announced in January the nomination of Myra to the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals. At Kalamazoo College Myra majored in psychology and studied abroad in Sierra Leone. She earned her J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School in 1980. After working for three years at the Washington, D.C., office of Seyfarth Shaw, Myra came to Indiana in 1983 and joined the law firm of Ice Miller Donadio and Ryan. She served as director of health care policy for Indiana Governor Evan Bayh before being appointed to the Indiana Supreme Court in 1995. She left the Supreme Court in 1999 to return to private practice at Ice Miller, where she handles commercial litigation. In 1999 she was selected to serve as the chair of the newly created Indiana Supreme Court’s Commission on Race and Gender Fairness. She continues to lead the commission’s efforts to study and make recommendations on increasing gender and racial fairness in the legal system.