Anita (Raby) Fox ’81

Anita was inducted into the Michigan Lawyers Weekly Class of 2014 “Women in the Law,” a distinction that honors outstanding accomplishments in private practice, the corporate arena, and social advocacy. In addition to being honored as one of the Top 30 “Women in the Law,” Anita has been selected by her peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America 2015 in the field of commercial litigation. She was named as a ‘Michigan Super Lawyer’ by Law & Politics Magazine in 2014. Anita also serves as a case evaluator for Ingham County and the U.S. District Court in the Western District of Michigan and is an adjunct professor at Michigan State University College of Law. At K Anita earned her bachelor’s degree in political science and studied abroad in Colombia. She earned her J.D. from the University of Michigan School of Law.

David Hammond ’73

A frequent contributor to Kalamazoo College’s LuxEsto and BeLight, David also is a corporate communications consultant and food journalist living in Oak Park, Ill. He is the founder and moderator of, the 8,500 member Chicago-based culinary chat site. David is a regular contributor of restaurant reviews and food-related articles for Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, TimeOut Chicago, and Chicago Reader, which published his seven-part guide to regional Mexican food in the city. He has also contributed food writing to blogs such as the Local Beet and Grubstreet Chicago. With his friend Michael Gebert (creator of “Sky Full of Bacon” video podcasts), David hosted a cable documentary on Hispanic chow at Chicago’s Maxwell Street Market, and he has just completed working on a video about “Taste of Melrose Park.” A returning guest on WLS and WGN AM radio, David produces the “Soundbites” series on the James Beard-nominated Eight Forty-Eight (Chicago Public Radio, WBEZ, 91.5FM); these radio pieces examine how Chicago chefs use sound in their kitchens. David was featured on “Good Morning, America,” “Chicago, Tonight,” and Nippon TV when he developed recipes for preparing seasonal cicadas, which invaded Chicagoland during the spring of 2007.

Michele Intermont, Associate Professor of Mathematics

Michele co-authored the article “Liberal Arts Colleges: An Overlooked Opportunity,” which appears in the May 2016 issue of Notices of the American Mathematical Society. The article cites several advantages for teaching at a place like K, including class sizes conducive to meaningful relationship building, breadth of teaching and freedom to design class syllabi; the opportunity to pursue research and involve undergraduates in research; deeper mentoring possibilities; and even the chance to test oneself beyond one’s discipline, for example in first-year seminars. Michelle contributed to the piece (pages 565-570) along with mathematics professors from Pomona College and the College of Holy Cross.

Dale Norton ’73

Dale was elected president of the National Pork Board in June of 2014. NPB is the trade association for U.S. pork producers. Dale has served on the 15-member board for five years. He and his brother Ken (class of 1971) raise hogs, among other agricultural operations, at Kendale Farm in Bronson, Michigan. Dale’s work with NPB was featured in a December article published in the Bronson Journal. In it he extols the value of a liberal arts education in farming and farm policy issues. The article also mentions the hog roast he and his brother have hosted for their K classmates and friends for nearly four decades.

Sandra Greene ’74

Sandra has been selected as a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Membership in the Academy is offered to leaders in the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, arts, business, public affairs and the nonprofit sectors. Members have included Martin Luther King Jr., Margaret Meade, Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. The current membership includes more than 250 Nobel Prize winners. Sandra holds master’s and Ph.D. degrees from Northwestern University (Evanston, Illinois). At K she majored in philosophy and studied abroad in Ghana. She is a professor of history at Cornell University and the author of West African Narratives of Slavery Texts from Late 19th and early 20th Century Ghana (Indiana University Press, 2011).

Charles Langton ’83

Charles is legal analyst, reporter, weekend morning anchor, and a co-host at FOX 2 (WJBK) in Southfield, Michigan. He also is a practicing attorney with his own law firm. At K he earned his bachelor’s degree in theatre arts, studied abroad in Aix-en-Provence, France, and won a best supporting actor award for a Festival Playhouse role in William Inge’s play Picnic. He earned his law degree from the Detroit College of Law and later enrolled at (and graduated first in his class from) the Specs Howard School of Broadcast Arts. Since then he has worked in several radio and television positions and has won four Emmys and three Wade McCree Jr. awards for excellence in legal journalism presented by the State Bar of Michigan.

Richard T. Stavig, Professor Emeritus of English, Director Emeritus of Foreign Study

Professor Stavig died on Sunday, Easter morning, April 5, 2015. He was 87 years old. During his tenure at the College Professor Stavig established his legacy in several areas. Generations of students remember him for his inspired teaching, careful scholarship, preparation and dedication to excellence. Colleagues at home and abroad owe a great deal to his skills as a gifted administrator. The College community benefits from the legacy of his high ethical and moral standards.

In 1955 Professor Stavig began his 37-year career at Kalamazoo College as an assistant professor of English. Some 30 years later–in a speech he gave on Honors Day (October 31, 1986) about the beginning of study abroad at Kalamazoo College–he described his feelings on being chosen to accompany the very first group of 25 K students to experience three months of foreign study in the summer of 1958:

“Wonder of wonders, a thirty-year-old untenured assistant professor of English who had been at K only three years, who had never been to Europe, and whose oral language skills were minimal was selected to take the first group over [on the ship Arosa Star, departing from Montreal on June 17] and give them–what else could he give them–minimal supervision. Plans had been carefully made, but there was simply a lot we just didn’t know. We did know, however, that we were involved in a great adventure, an adventure that had tremendous implications for us and our college. And we knew we had the responsibility for making it work.”

That same year he accompanied the first group of students to study abroad Professor Stavig also was promoted to associate professor English.

He became a full professor in 1963 and served in that capacity until his retirement from K in 1992. And he did much more. In 1962–the year the K-Plan launched as the College’s curriculum–Professor Stavig became K’s first director of foreign study. In this role he established procedures and goals that are still valid today. Five years later he was named dean of off-campus education. He served in both of those posts until 1974.

In 1982, Stavig was awarded the Florence J. Lucasse Fellowship for excellence in teaching, the highest honor for pedagogy, and one conferred by one’s faculty colleagues. Stavig’s speech accepting the award is a study in keen and humble insight into the art of teaching. In the speech he shares 11 observations about the profession of college professor. Among those observations one finds these favorites: “2) Education is life for the students, teachers, and others who are engaged in it. Each of us should, therefore, seek to provide pleasure, satisfaction, rewards, and a sense of worth for all those who participate; 5) Anyone who claims to understand completely what happens in the classroom is either a fool or a liar. Each class, each day, is inevitably a new adventure. Sometimes everything clicks and the world is beautiful; sometimes, for whatever reasons, nothing works and one wonders what sins could possibly have earned such punishment; and 7) The longer I teach, the less concerned I am with supplying good answers and the more concerned I am with asking good questions.”

Rightly considered one of the founders of the K-Plan, Professor Stavig loved, believed in and advocated for the educational leaps that result from foreign study. He credited study abroad in large part to the vision of his friend, English department colleague, and fellow K-Plan architect, Larry Barrett, who also died on an Easter morning. “Larry Barrett saw foreign study as a unique opportunity for us to experiment and innovate,” said Professor Stavig, “to see if a boldly different kind of educational experience could be made to work. And he wanted this because he always wanted education simply to be better for the students.” And so, too, did the man who wrote those words about his friend.

Jeff Hsi ’83

, Tuesday, September 6, 2016, in Dexter, Mich. (Junfu Han | The Ann Arbor News)

Jeff delivered the keynote address at last month’s Convocation ceremony. His story is a K-Plan tale of two distinguished careers. His significant achievements as a medicinal chemist and as a patent attorney–indeed the adroitness with which he made that career change–he attributed in part to his Kalamazoo College experience. At K he majored in chemistry. After graduate school (M.S., Indiana University; Ph.D., University of Michigan) and a postdoctoral fellowship (University of South Carolina), Jeff went to work as a senior scientist in cardiovascular diseases at a multinational pharmaceutical company. While he was a working scientist and inventor (he holds several patents) he became intrigued by patent law and intellectual property law and decided to make a career change. He earned his J.D. from Rutgers University School of Law (1997) and since then has worked for several prestigious law firms and served as in-house counsel for a biopharmaceutical start-up company. Jeff is an internationally invited speaker on various intellectual property issues, and he has lectured at the Harvard Extension School and at MIT Sloan School of Management. Jeff also is a dedicated volunteer for various nonprofit organizations. He was a member of the board of trustees at Kalamazoo College and is currently serving as a board member for Asian Americans Advancing Justice–AAJC (Asian American Justice Center) in Washington, D.C.– where he chairs the Policy and Programs Committee. Today Jeff is a shareholder at the intellectual property law firm of Wolf Greenfield. His legal experience is wide-ranging, from preparing and prosecuting patent applications in numerous scientific areas to establishing licensing and research and development collaboration agreements.

Kristian Bjørnard ’03

Kristian is a new faculty member at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA), where he will teach courses in advanced design, interactive media and graphic design. Kristian is a designer, thinker and “sustainabilitist.” He is the director of “The Office of Kristian Bjørnard,” a design studio focused on publishing in all its forms. Kristian holds an MFA in graphic design from MICA; he earned his bachelor’s degree in art at Kalamazoo College. The artist nearly became an engineer. His exploration of physics and mathematics filtered through the lenses of painting and drawing led Kristian to graphic design. Current research includes “sustainable graphic design” and new publishing utilities. This has resulted in various “sustainable” aesthetic exercises, a more purposeful interest into systems, exploring reusable processes, a focus on rules-based design concepts, and investigating vernacular design methodologies. Kristian keeps abreast of current web trends, standards, and technologies, and explores time and motion in both digital and print media. His myriad interests make for interesting insights and connections among science, philosophy and the practice of design—-both in the classroom and in his professional practice.