Archives

David Rector ’66

David died on September 16, 2014. He earned his Bachelor’s degree in physics and studied abroad in Erlangen, Germany. David worked for the State of Michigan for 30 years. He enjoyed photography, woodworking, crossword puzzles, and music, and he loved visiting Torch Lake and traveling. David was very active in class of 1966 activities (rarely, if ever, missing a reunion or other opportunity to gather with classmates) and he loved his alma mater.

E. Hunter Wright Jr. ’44

Hunter died on December 16, 2014. At K he was a member of Century Forum, and it was at K that he met and married Betty Zick. Soon after their marriage (1942) Hunter enlisted in the United States Army Signal Corps and served in New Guinea, Australia, and the Philippines during World War II as a cryptographic technician. Hunter worked in the insurance business in St. Joseph, Michigan, for 30 years. He and Betty were blessed with 72 years of marriage and three children. Hunter enjoyed sports, loved photography, and served as a hospital volunteer.

John Grandin ’63

On a recent trip to Florida from Rhode Island, John and his wife, Carol, stopped in Atlanta and had a great two-day visit with Dick Compans ’63 and his wife, Marian. John is professor emeritus of German and director emeritus of the International Engineering Program at the University of Rhode Island. Dick is professor of microbiology and immunology in the Emory University School of Medicine. He also directs the Influenza Pathogenesis & Immunology Research Center.

 

Joe Brockington, Ph.D., Associate Provost for International Programs

Joe died on August 12, 2015. In addition to his post in the Center for International Programs, he also served as professor of German language and literature.

He earned his B.A., M.A. and Ph.D degrees from Michigan State University, and began his career at Kalamazoo College in 1979 as an instructor in German language and literature. During his 35-year career at K, Joe served in several roles in the Center for International Programs before being named associate provost in 2000. He was recognized internationally as a safety and risk management expert in study abroad programming. During his career he served in various positions of NAFSA: Association of International Educators, including chair of the Section on U.S. Students Abroad and member of the International Education Leadership Knowledge Committee. He also served as a member of the founding board of the Forum on Education Abroad, the Association of International Education Administrators. Joe published and presented numerous papers on modern German literature as well as a variety of study abroad topics, including orientation and re-entry, international programs administration, and campus internationalization. He led best practices workshops in legal and risk management issues and co-edited the third edition of NAFSA’s Guide to Education Abroad for Advisers and Administrators.

“Joe interacted with generations of K students,” said President Eileen B. Wilson-Oyelaran, “and increased their opportunities for independent research and service learning abroad. He was a faithful advocate for international students at K, working with colleagues to ensure a full and productive K educational experience. Joe significantly expanded K’s reputation as a leader in study abroad and international programming. He will be missed by many in the K family and throughout the world.”

In the fall of 2008 Kalamazoo College celebrated its 50th anniversary of sending students abroad. Joe devoted his career to that important educational tradition. Some 80 percent of K students have studied in programs ranging from China and Japan to India and Israel; from Kenya and Senegal in Africa to Ecuador, Costa Rica, Chile, and Mexico in South and Central America. Their options have included European programs in Greece, Hungary, Denmark, Italy, and England as well as the opportunities that have continued (since the program’s origins) in France, Spain, and Germany. Most students study in a foreign language and live with host families. And most participate in an Individualized Cultural Research Project that requires them to get out into a community, participate in a service project, and write a report about the experience. All of that is part of the legacy of Joe Brockington. “The goal,” he once said, “is to help the student look at other cultures, other peoples, and say ‘we’ instead of ‘they.’”

Donald Stowe ’56

Don died on September 11, 2014. He was a lifelong resident of Kalamazoo and earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry from K. He was a member of the men’s Hornet tennis team and part of the 1956 undefeated squad. He also helped his father, Allen Stowe (a professor of chemistry at K from 1928 to 1957), run the National Junior Tennis Championships for many years. Don earned a master’s degree from Western Michigan University and was a chemistry teacher at Portage Central High School for 37 years. He also was a longtime tennis coach at the school.  Don’s extraordinary ability in the classroom was recognized by the American Chemical Society (Kalamazoo Section) with a Science Teacher of the Year Award. Don combined his military service with his love of tennis. He served in the United States Army during the Korean War and led his team to the First Infantry Division Tennis Championships in 1954. Don was involved in Boy Scouts and an active member of the Kalamazoo Coalition for the Protection of Children and Families. He had an avid love of photography and computers and designed the first web page for his church. Don is survived by his wife, Jan, their three children, nine grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.

Mary Adams-Catanach ’81

Mary died on December 20, 2014, in an automobile accident. She was born and grew up in Evanston, Illinois. At K she earned her bachelor’s degree in art and studied abroad in Madrid, Spain. In the mid-1990s she moved to Santa Fe, N.M., and worked in various jobs before securing a teaching certificate. Most recently Mary worked for Easter Seals El Mirador as a counselor for intellectually disabled adults.

Russ Schelb ’61

Russ served in Vietnam during the American war there. He and most of his men survived their service. It was in the United States that he suffered a gunshot wound during a robbery at the motel he owned and operated in Denver. He has since retired and enjoys life fully with his wife Cai Thi and their family. At K, Russ was a terrific runner and a you-can-do-it supporter of others, according to his cross-country teammate Don Schneider ’63. Don and Russ recently reconnected after 50 years. “Russ says he has slowed some,” wrote Don, “but you can reach him quickly via e-mail.”

Theresa (Horn) Horowitz ’05

Theresa received her bachelor’s degree in psychology at K and her M.S.W. from Washington University in St. Louis. She is a Social Work Clinical Leader at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago. Theresa became certified as a Treatment Specialist in Diverse Populations and works with the most complex cases within the hospital. She has 10 years of experience in direct practice with mental health and health care, and she has expertise in crisis management, solution-focused therapy, severe mental illnesses, diverse populations and trauma. Theresa has presented at national conferences and webinars discussing innovative social work models for healthcare, and recently she published an article in the journal Collaborative Case Management that introduces a new team-based model for managing difficult cases within a hospital setting. In addition to her social work practice, she has taught undergraduate psychology courses for five years as an adjunct professor. Theresa and Justin Horowitz have been together for 14 years. They have been married for more than five years. They are expecting their first child this fall.