Archives

Donald Stowe ’56

Don died on September 11, 2014. He was a lifelong resident of Kalamazoo and earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry from K. He was a member of the men’s Hornet tennis team and part of the 1956 undefeated squad. He also helped his father, Allen Stowe (a professor of chemistry at K from 1928 to 1957), run the National Junior Tennis Championships for many years. Don earned a master’s degree from Western Michigan University and was a chemistry teacher at Portage Central High School for 37 years. He also was a longtime tennis coach at the school.  Don’s extraordinary ability in the classroom was recognized by the American Chemical Society (Kalamazoo Section) with a Science Teacher of the Year Award. Don combined his military service with his love of tennis. He served in the United States Army during the Korean War and led his team to the First Infantry Division Tennis Championships in 1954. Don was involved in Boy Scouts and an active member of the Kalamazoo Coalition for the Protection of Children and Families. He had an avid love of photography and computers and designed the first web page for his church. Don is survived by his wife, Jan, their three children, nine grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.

Mary Adams-Catanach ’81

Mary died on December 20, 2014, in an automobile accident. She was born and grew up in Evanston, Illinois. At K she earned her bachelor’s degree in art and studied abroad in Madrid, Spain. In the mid-1990s she moved to Santa Fe, N.M., and worked in various jobs before securing a teaching certificate. Most recently Mary worked for Easter Seals El Mirador as a counselor for intellectually disabled adults.

Russ Schelb ’61

Russ served in Vietnam during the American war there. He and most of his men survived their service. It was in the United States that he suffered a gunshot wound during a robbery at the motel he owned and operated in Denver. He has since retired and enjoys life fully with his wife Cai Thi and their family. At K, Russ was a terrific runner and a you-can-do-it supporter of others, according to his cross-country teammate Don Schneider ’63. Don and Russ recently reconnected after 50 years. “Russ says he has slowed some,” wrote Don, “but you can reach him quickly via e-mail.”

Theresa (Horn) Horowitz ’05

Theresa received her bachelor’s degree in psychology at K and her M.S.W. from Washington University in St. Louis. She is a Social Work Clinical Leader at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago. Theresa became certified as a Treatment Specialist in Diverse Populations and works with the most complex cases within the hospital. She has 10 years of experience in direct practice with mental health and health care, and she has expertise in crisis management, solution-focused therapy, severe mental illnesses, diverse populations and trauma. Theresa has presented at national conferences and webinars discussing innovative social work models for healthcare, and recently she published an article in the journal Collaborative Case Management that introduces a new team-based model for managing difficult cases within a hospital setting. In addition to her social work practice, she has taught undergraduate psychology courses for five years as an adjunct professor. Theresa and Justin Horowitz have been together for 14 years. They have been married for more than five years. They are expecting their first child this fall.

Carol (Spiro) Barger ’68

Carol died on June 28, 2015, in Columbus, Ohio, following a brief illness. She earned her B.A. at K in religion and studied abroad in Caen, France. She had recently retired from a 30-year career teaching first grade at Rosehill Elementary School in Reynoldsburg, Ohio. She is survived by her two sons, Kyle and Kurt, and their spouses, Tayah and Christianne, respectively.

Bob Brackenridge ’63

Bob and his wife, Sue (Wotila) Brackenridge ’65, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on June 19 with family and friends in Chattanooga, Tennessee. They are still active and healthy, and both attended the 2015 Homecoming in Kalamazoo. They also are planning a Michigan trip in May 2016 that will include stops at the Senior PGA golf tournament in Benton Harbor, the Michigan capitol in Lansing, and the Upper Peninsula. The latter is sure to rekindle memories of Bob’s “Soo to Kazoo in ‘62” cross-country relay with Coach Swede Thomas and Hornet harrier teammates.

G. Robert (Bob) Miyagawa ’54

Bob died on January 23, 2016. He grew up in Kalamazoo and at K majored in economics and business. After graduation he enlisted in the U.S. Navy, served for 23 years, and retired as a Captain in 1978. He piloted land- and carrier-based anti-submarine aircraft in the Pacific and North Atlantic for 10 years. He was an instructor in warfare tactics at the Naval Academy (Annapolis, Md.) and the Naval War College (Newport, R.I.). Bob was Communications Commander in the Pacific Command during the Vietnam War era. He served as the Air Operations Officer on the USS Hornet for the Apollo 12 recovery mission in the South Pacific. He concluded his Naval career as Commanding Officer of a tactical air control group based in Norfolk, Va.,supporting NATO in the North Atlantic and Mediterranean. He was married to Ellen Jane Brooks for more than 50 years, until her death in 2006. They had two children. Bob married Bonny Turner, who survives, in 2013.

David Evans, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biology

DavidEvansDavid died on September 20, 2016. He was 77 years old, four days shy of his 78th birthday, and doing one of the things he loved most–taking a walk on a trail. David’s 39-year career at Kalamazoo College began in 1965 and concluded with his retirement in 2004. “Biology is magnificent,” he once said, “and humbling, and goofy. In some sense, biology is best approached with a good eye for silliness, for it is stuffed with paradoxes, irony, and the ridiculous. This aspect of the subject is often the most engaging for non-majors, but it never fails to lead to more sophisticated material. I often used this movement from the ridiculous to the sublime as a teaching strategy in my courses.”

David’s area of specialty was insect behavior, and two important (and related) themes of his teaching and research were seasonality and adaptation. He earned his undergraduate degree in biology from Carleton College and his master’s degree and doctorate from the University of Wisconsin. His research was published in numerous journals, and he received many academic grants during his career.

His work took him to Africa many times. In 1982 he was a Fulbright professor of Biological Sciences at Njala University College at the University of Sierra Leone. In the early 1990s he visited the continent to study locust migrations on behalf of the United States Agency for International Development. His work and study in Africa became the basis for one of his K courses, “Ecology of Africa.” In 1995 he received the Frances Diebold Award for Contributions to the College Community, and in 1998 the faculty awarded him its highest teaching honor, the Florence J. Lucasse Lectureship for Excellence in Teaching. Those awards were related, in part, to the K marine ecology courses he co-taught with the late David Winch (professor emeritus of physics) on site at San Salvador Island and Jewfish Cay in the Caribbean. “On campus,” he said, “the class handled gray rubbery specimens preserved in jars. In San Salvador the students experienced the organisms alive and in color, and observed how they behaved in their habitat. It was like having one’s eyesight restored.”

Near and after his retirement he served during the summers as a naturalist at Fort Abercrombie State Park on Kodiak Island, Alaska. He loved that assignment, in part because of the “really cool truck” he drove, but mostly because of the liberal arts breadth of the work. In addition to naturalist, he worked as the island’s historian (delving into the area’s World War II days, in particular), and he wrote a weekly column for the island’s newspaper. Shortly after his final courses in a K classroom (spring term 2004) David served as “ship’s biology teacher” in a Semester-at-Sea program that circumnavigated the globe, with stops that included Japan, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Myanmar, Kenya, South Africa, Brazil and Cuba. And long into his retirement he often contacted the College with alerts regarding the achievements of his former students, both majors and non-majors.

David always loved the liberal arts, a passion closely related to his academic and research interest in adaptation. He believed that the liberal arts was the best educational model to develop a broader range of reference and a better sense of humor, traits he considered essential for adaptation in careers and life in general.

He died taking a walk, an activity he loved (particularly along an ocean shore) and that he wrote about in his August 29, 2001, column in the Kodiak Daily Mirror, his final column for that summer’s season.

“For me, the last tide pool walks mean that the park season is winding down….[T]idepooling is one of the most unpredictable park activities in which I’m involved. We seem to have a particularly good time when children are along…

“There’s an Alutiq saying that expresses tidal rhythms in terms of using plants and animals as food: When the tide goes out, the table is set; When the tide comes in, the dishes are washed. The saying gets to the same rhythmic renewal that makes me appreciate this kind of field activity so much. I know I can go down to an area where I’ve been dozens of times, and I can be guaranteed of seeing something new and wondrous.”