Archives

Matthew J. Christensen ’92

Matthew J. ChristensenMatthew was awarded the 2017 American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship and the 2017 National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipends grant to support the research and writing of a scholarly study, Unsovereign Bodies: The State and the Individual Subject in African Detective Fiction. The book traces the history of the detective genre as a mode of critique in Anglophone African writing. Matthew is a professor in the Department of Literatures and Cultural Studies at the University of Texas, Rio Grande Valley. At K he majored in English and studied abroad in Sierra Leone. He earned his master’s and doctorate degrees at UCLA.

Michael Finkler ’91

Mike was the elder statesman, so to speak, of several generations of Kalamazoo College biology majors who attended the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. Pictured with Mike (far left) are (l-r): Sarah Bouchard ’95, associate professor of biology, Otterbein University; Claire Riggs ’11, graduate student in the department of biology at Portland State University; Wendy Reed ’92, associate professor and chair of biological sciences, North Dakota State University; Eddy Price ’99, post-doctoral fellow, Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin; Alan Faber ’14, biology major at K; and Ed Dzialowski ’93, associate professor and associate chair of biological sciences, University of North Texas.

J. Peter Coppinger ’99

Peter is an associate professor of biology at the Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, Indiana. Peter’s research interests include plant-microbe interactions and identification of phytoplasma in wildflowers. He teaches courses in cell and molecular biology, genetics, industrial microbiology, and plant biology. Peter earned his bachelor’s degree in biology and studied abroad in Aberdeen Scotland. After he graduated from K he was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship and studied rainforest ecophysiology at Macquarie Univeristy in Sydney, Australia. He earned his Ph.D. in plant biology at the University of California at Berkeley.

Mark Allen ’77, D.D.S.

Mark is a clinical instructor at the Kois Learning Center in Seattle, Washington. He is a member of the American Academy of Implant Dentistry and the Frances B. Vedder Society of Crown and Bridge Prosthodontics. He is a part time faculty member at Western Michigan University, where he also coaches the university’s rugby team. Mark practices dentistry in Kalamazoo. He earned his B.A. at K in chemistry and earned his D.D.S. from the University of Michigan (1981).

Kimberly Osborne ’93

Since her return last year from her position as chief strategic communications adviser to the Afghan National Security Forces in Kabul, Kimberly has built a successful international consultant practice with clients in Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., and Africa. Last June she was selected as a Fulbright Specialist and will work on various educational capacity building projects at foreign institutions. And this fall she became the first person to hold the endowed C-SPAN Chair at the Brian Lamb School for Communication at Purdue University. She teaches and builds programs at the nexus of public policy and mass communication.

Kristine Sholty ’11

Kristine is a social media and communications officer at Wayne State University. She oversees the crowdfunding platform for Wayne State University. Her duties include implementing program goals, providing strategic and technical assistance, and promoting Giving Day initiatives through social media, presentations and meetings. Previously she was an annual fund associate at Vista Maria, where her duties were to maintain and organize all donor constituency information, action plans and gift collection data. At K Kristine majored in international and area studies and studied abroad in Caceres, Spain.

Jennifer Perry ’02

Jennifer is the new assistant principal of Pioneer Valley Regional School in Northfield, Massachusetts. From 2008 to 2012, Jennifer held two different teaching positions within the New York City Public School District at P.S./I.S. 50 Vito Marcantonio School and at The Facing History School. In 2012 she took a teaching position at Dupont Middle School in Chicopee, Massachusetts. She has experience teaching English, social studies and various subjects in the humanities. Jennifer received two master’s degrees: one in East Asian languages and cultures from Columbia University in 2007, and another in school leadership from American International College in 2015. At K she majored in English and studied abroad in Kenya.

Robert Neuman ’66, Ph.D.

Robert has written College Smart, a three-book series for students, parents and educators aimed at helping kids prepare for college, graduate from college on time, and save money. Robert taps experience and expertise he gained from his long career in higher education (he was formerly associate dean of the College of the Arts and Sciences at Marquette University in Milwaukee, and he spent 30 years counseling students). His book series helps readers develop the organizational and time management skills necessary for success in college.

Michael Winkelman ’91

Michael has published a new book: A Cognitive Approach to John Donne’s Songs and Sonnets, part of publisher Palgrave Macmillan’s series titled “Cognitive Studies in Literature and Performance.” Investigations into brain function have led to recent remarkable discoveries with profound implications for interpreting literature. Donne, who wrote in the 17th century, was a contemporary of Shakespeare and one of the first Metaphysical poets. He later became a famous cleric many of whose meditations are cited today. For example, “Meditation XVII” from Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions includes the famous prose passage that begins “No man is an island” and concludes with “And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.” Donne’s probing insights, expressed in his unique Metaphysical style, make his amorous verse a ripe subject for cognitive analysis. Winkelman’s study applies recent breakthroughs from neuroscience and evolutionary psychology in order to deepen the understanding of Donne’s songs and sonnets. By applying findings from neurolinguistics to Donne’s work, Winkelman presents a test case for the cognitive interpretation of verse and, more broadly, advances the case of New Humanism.