Archives

Cheryl Hanna ’88

Cheryl died on July 27, 2014. She was a professor at the Vermont Law School and a well-known legal analyst. She earned her bachelor’s degree at K in anthropology and sociology and earned her law degree from Harvard. After working as an assistant state’s attorney in Baltimore, Hanna began her teaching career at Vermont Law School in 1994. She often offered legal commentary to the Vermont media on a wide range of topics. Those included the death penalty, abortion, the First Amendment, and the legal fight to close the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant. She was known for making recondite legal language accessible to lay audiences and for elucidating the impact of legal decisions on everyday people. Hanna was active with the Girl Scouts and with Council for the Future of Vermont. She was elected the chairwoman of the board of trustees for the Richard and Barbara Snelling Center for Government in 2010. She also had served on the board of trustees of Planned Parenthood of Northern New England and as a member of the Vermont Gender Bias Study Implementation Task Force. Hanna also was a recipient of the Sister Elizabeth Candon Distinguished Service Award by Vermont Women in Higher Education. She is survived by her husband, Paul Henninge, and their two children.

Alice Lynette (Spath) Blanchard

Alice, who went by her middle name of Lynette, died on March 13, 2014. She taught flute for 30 years at Kalamazoo College. At an early age, she became a flutist with the Kalamazoo Junior Symphony Orchestra, rapidly advancing to first chair. She graduated from the School of Music at the University of Michigan in 1943. During her college summers she taught flute at the renowned Interlochen Music Camp. In 1943 she married Raywood Helmer Blanchard, who after his military service as a pilot in the Army Air Corps, enjoyed a career as an international patent attorney. Lynette served as principle flutist with the Kalamazoo Symphony Orchestra for 25 years. When the couple retired to McAllen, Texas, she was the first chair flutist and president of the McAllen Town Band. She was an avid golfer and active in the Methodist Church. You could find her playing the piano for her Sunday school class on any Sunday when she wasn’t fishing with her son in Rockport, Texas.

David Clowers ’64

David read his poetry for the Dickinson Poetry Series last month at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Door County (Wisconsin). David’s career path has been a spiral. He earned degrees in English (B.A. Kalamazoo College; M.A. University of Michigan) and then taught British and American literature at Drake University for three years. He earned his law degree from the University of Chicago and made a three-decade career change into the practice of law. All the while he continued to write poetry. When he moved to Door County (2001) he started writing more seriously, eventually achieving his goal of writing one poem a day. For the past six years he has taught poetry for the county’s Learning in Retirement Program. He has published two chapbooks: Shedding My Three Piece Birthday Suit and Doggysatva Love and Other Possible Illusions.

John Grandin ’63

On a recent trip to Florida from Rhode Island, John and his wife, Carol, stopped in Atlanta and had a great two-day visit with Dick Compans ’63 and his wife, Marian. John is professor emeritus of German and director emeritus of the International Engineering Program at the University of Rhode Island. Dick is professor of microbiology and immunology in the Emory University School of Medicine. He also directs the Influenza Pathogenesis & Immunology Research Center.

 

Kristian Bjørnard ’03

Kristian Bjørnard ’03Kristian is a new faculty member at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA), where he will teach courses in advanced design, interactive media and graphic design. Kristian is a designer, thinker and “sustainabilitist.” He is the director of “The Office of Kristian Bjørnard,” a design studio focused on publishing in all its forms. Kristian holds an MFA in graphic design from MICA; he earned his bachelor’s degree in art at Kalamazoo College. The artist nearly became an engineer. His exploration of physics and mathematics filtered through the lenses of painting and drawing led Kristian to graphic design. Current research includes “sustainable graphic design” and new publishing utilities. This has resulted in various “sustainable” aesthetic exercises, a more purposeful interest into systems, exploring reusable processes, a focus on rules-based design concepts, and investigating vernacular design methodologies. Kristian keeps abreast of current web trends, standards, and technologies, and explores time and motion in both digital and print media. His myriad interests make for interesting insights and connections among science, philosophy and the practice of design—-both in the classroom and in his professional practice.

Bill Dawson ’78

Bill was inducted into the Lake County (Ill.) Sports Hall of Fame for his career coaching cross country and track. Over his tenure he has worked with seven state champions, three state record setters and three high school All-Americans. Six of his athletes have gone on to earn All-American honors in college, including one national champion. Another athlete was overall national champion and an Olympian. Bill continues to teach math and coach at Warren Township High School in Gurnee, Ill.

Brandon Scarber ’08

Brandon is a senior admissions advisor at Michigan State University. His story (“Brandon Scarber, an emerging leader,” by Patreice Massey) was featured in a recent issue of The Michigan Chronicle. At K Brandon majored in economics and business and earned a minor and concentration in English and African studies, respectively. He graduated with honors and in 2013 completed his master’s degree in public administration (University of Michigan-Dearborn) with a concentration in nonprofit leadership. He has worked at M.S.U. for five years.

Matthew J. Christensen ’92

Matthew J. ChristensenMatthew was awarded the 2017 American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship and the 2017 National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipends grant to support the research and writing of a scholarly study, Unsovereign Bodies: The State and the Individual Subject in African Detective Fiction. The book traces the history of the detective genre as a mode of critique in Anglophone African writing. Matthew is a professor in the Department of Literatures and Cultural Studies at the University of Texas, Rio Grande Valley. At K he majored in English and studied abroad in Sierra Leone. He earned his master’s and doctorate degrees at UCLA.

Michael Finkler ’91

Mike was the elder statesman, so to speak, of several generations of Kalamazoo College biology majors who attended the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. Pictured with Mike (far left) are (l-r): Sarah Bouchard ’95, associate professor of biology, Otterbein University; Claire Riggs ’11, graduate student in the department of biology at Portland State University; Wendy Reed ’92, associate professor and chair of biological sciences, North Dakota State University; Eddy Price ’99, post-doctoral fellow, Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin; Alan Faber ’14, biology major at K; and Ed Dzialowski ’93, associate professor and associate chair of biological sciences, University of North Texas.