Archives

Carrie Heitman ’98

Carrie recently appeared in the world premiere of The Summoners, a play staged at the C.O.W. in New York City, and in International Falls at the Roundabout Theatre Company, also in New York. After earning a B.A. in philosophy from K, Carrie received her M.F.A. degree from University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she received the Louise Lamont Award for Excellence as well as honors in all areas of performance. She has appeared off-Broadway and performed in the United Kingdom, Poland, Russia, and Malaysia. Among many other plays, she has acted in The Mystery Spot, directed by K alumna Holly Hughes ’77. Carrie is also a teaching artist with Roundabout. You can read more about her at her website.

Sally (Warner) Read ’08

Sally is the new head of the Kazoo School, a preschool through 8th grade private school in Kalamazoo. She wrote a blog post in the autumn that touched on the subjects of family, home, reunions, and the magic of entering an elementary school as an adult: “Because I work in one every day, I often forget what a magical experience it is to enter an elementary school as an adult. We are instantly transported to an earlier time–hopefully a happy time–of pencil shavings and kickball, backpacks and circle gatherings.” The post also says some very nice things about the pull of one’s alma mater. Sally graduated with bachelor’s degree in psychology, and she studied abroad in Caceres, Spain. Sally’s husband, Courtney Read, graduated as a member of the class of 2006. He majored in history and studied abroad in Erlangen, Germany.

LaNesha (McCoy) DeBardelaben ’02

LaNesha is the vice president of assessment and community engagement at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. She engages the museum in substantive community collaborations and initiatives, and she is leading its effort to gain national accreditation. LaNeesha also supervises the museum’s education department. She has served on the board of directors of the Michigan Council for History Education. Her honors include a 2014 Crain Detroit Business “40 Under 40” Award. LaNesha has a passion for public history, culture and the arts, literacy, and education, and she fosters museum programming around these critical areas of impact. She also serves as president of the Detroit Pierians, Inc., a national black women’s arts society. At K she earned her B.A. in history and studied abroad in Kenya. She holds a master’s degree from the University of Missouri and a Master of Library Sciences degree from Indiana University-Bloomington. She is pursuing a Ph.D. at Michigan State University.

George Williams ’41

George died on November 18, 2015. He was 95 years old. George majored in English at K. He was a member of the 1940 Men’s Tennis Team, which was elected to the Kalamazoo College Athletics Hall of Fame in 2007. George also received a Citation of Merit Award (2002) from the College’s Emeritus Club. He earned a master’s degree from George Washington University and worked briefly for Fairchild Aircraft (Hagerstown, Md.) before beginning a long and distinguished career in international higher education. He moved to Istanbul, Turkey, in 1942 where he taught and worked in administration at Robert College. He also worked at colleges in Libya, Washington, D.C., and Monterey, Calif. While at Robert College he traveled extensively throughout the Middle East and also drove through Europe many times on family vacations. He remained active in athletics–swimming and basketball as well as tennis–and oftentimes swam from Europe to Asia and back again across the Bosphorus. He was married for 71 years to Mary (Hosford) Williams, class of 1943, who survives. They have two children. Their daughter, Janice Kies, is a member of the class of 1972. George also is survived by his brother Owen (class of 1948) and his sister Mary Danielson (class of 1950).

Peter O’Brien ’82

BrienPeter has published The Muslim Question in Europe. The book challenges the popular notion that the hostilities concerning immigration—which continues to provoke debates about citizenship, headscarves, secularism, and terrorism—are a clash between “Islam and the West.” Rather, Peter explains, the vehement controversies surrounding European Muslims are better understood as persistent, unresolved intra-European tensions. The best way to understand the politics of state accommodation of European Muslims is through the lens of three competing political ideologies: liberalism, nationalism, and postmodernism. These three broadly understood philosophical traditions represent the most influential normative forces in the politics of immigration in Europe today. He concludes that Muslim Europeans do not represent a monolithic anti-Western bloc within Europe. Although they vehemently disagree among themselves, it is along the same basic liberal, nationalist, and postmodern contours as non-Muslim Europeans. Peter is professor of political science at Trinity University (San Antonio, Texas). He earned his B.A degree in political science at K and both M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His previous books are Beyond the Swastika (Routledge, 1996) and European Perceptions of Islam and America from Saladin to George W. Bush (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008). At K Peter did his foreign study in Hannover, Germany.

Aaron Saari ’98

Aaron is the new part-time pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Yellow Springs, Ohio. A bible scholar and theologian, Aaron is the author of The Many Deaths of Judas Iscariot, a book about the historical figure and the issue of suicide. He has been a visiting professor at Xavier and an adjunct instructor at Antioch University Midwest, teaching courses in writing, Christianity, and non-western religions.

Scott Whitbeck ’04

Scott was the “Coaches’ Confidential” spotlight subject in the November 9 issue of SwimSwam. Scott is the head coach of the SUNY-New Paltz men’s and women’s swimming teams. He’s been at the college for seven years and has led his swimmers to numerous school records, All-American honors, and NCAA championship qualifying swims. In 2011 he was named Coach of the Year in the Division III State University of New York Athletic Conference. Says Scott, “As I get older the biggest joy I have in this job is not necessarily in watching the team go fast at a duel or championship meet, but in seeing the athletes accomplish something they didn’t think was possible and grow in the process.” There’s lots more in the interview, including nice mention of his alma mater. At K he majored in economics and business and studied abroad in Madrid, Spain.

Zachary Norman ’07

Zachary has accepted a position as Research Associate in Photography at the University of Notre Dame. He earned his bachelor’s degree in art at K and studied abroad in Nairobi, Kenya. He did his graduate studies at Indiana University and recently presented work on the concept of plenoptics at a national conference in New Orleans. He’ll begin work at Notre Dame on August 1.

Elizabeth (Ryder) Napier ’72

lizabethNapierElizabeth, a professor of English and American literatures at Middlebury College, has written and published the book Defoe’s Major Fiction: Accounting for the Self (University of Delaware Press). According to the publisher, “The book focuses on the pervasive concern with narrativity and self-construction that marks Defoe’s first-person fictional narratives. Defoe’s fictions focus obsessively and elaborately on the act of storytelling—not only in his creation of idiosyncratic voices preoccupied with the telling (and often the concealing) of their own life stories but also in his narrators’ repeated adversion to other, untold stories that compete for attention with their own.” At K Elizabeth majored in English and studied abroad in Bonn, Germany. She earned her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Virginia.