Archives

Maggie Kane ’13

Maggie is program quality coordinator for the St. Paul (Minn.) Public Schools Foundation, an AmeriCorps position. She’ll spend the next year coordinating tutoring programs that support literacy and math at the public schools, evaluating the success of those programs, and working with the resource library to assist tutoring partners.

Cheryl Hanna ’88

Cheryl died on July 27, 2014. She was a professor at the Vermont Law School and a well-known legal analyst. She earned her bachelor’s degree at K in anthropology and sociology and earned her law degree from Harvard. After working as an assistant state’s attorney in Baltimore, Hanna began her teaching career at Vermont Law School in 1994. She often offered legal commentary to the Vermont media on a wide range of topics. Those included the death penalty, abortion, the First Amendment, and the legal fight to close the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant. She was known for making recondite legal language accessible to lay audiences and for elucidating the impact of legal decisions on everyday people. Hanna was active with the Girl Scouts and with Council for the Future of Vermont. She was elected the chairwoman of the board of trustees for the Richard and Barbara Snelling Center for Government in 2010. She also had served on the board of trustees of Planned Parenthood of Northern New England and as a member of the Vermont Gender Bias Study Implementation Task Force. Hanna also was a recipient of the Sister Elizabeth Candon Distinguished Service Award by Vermont Women in Higher Education. She is survived by her husband, Paul Henninge, and their two children.

Michael Winkelman ’91

Michael has published a new book: A Cognitive Approach to John Donne’s Songs and Sonnets, part of publisher Palgrave Macmillan’s series titled “Cognitive Studies in Literature and Performance.” Investigations into brain function have led to recent remarkable discoveries with profound implications for interpreting literature. Donne, who wrote in the 17th century, was a contemporary of Shakespeare and one of the first Metaphysical poets. He later became a famous cleric many of whose meditations are cited today. For example, “Meditation XVII” from Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions includes the famous prose passage that begins “No man is an island” and concludes with “And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.” Donne’s probing insights, expressed in his unique Metaphysical style, make his amorous verse a ripe subject for cognitive analysis. Winkelman’s study applies recent breakthroughs from neuroscience and evolutionary psychology in order to deepen the understanding of Donne’s songs and sonnets. By applying findings from neurolinguistics to Donne’s work, Winkelman presents a test case for the cognitive interpretation of verse and, more broadly, advances the case of New Humanism.

Jessica Halonen ’94

Jessica juried the University of North Dakota Department of Art & Design annual Student Art Collective competition in the University’s Hughes Fine Arts Center. Jessica is assistant professor in the Department of Art and Art History at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. She received her M.F.A. degree in painting from Washington University in Saint Louis. She has been an artist-in-residence at the MacDowell Colony in New Hampshire and a Core Fellow at the Glassell School of Art, Museum of Fine Arts, in Houston, Texas.

Carrie Heitman ’98

Carrie recently appeared in the world premiere of The Summoners, a play staged at the C.O.W. in New York City, and in International Falls at the Roundabout Theatre Company, also in New York. After earning a B.A. in philosophy from K, Carrie received her M.F.A. degree from University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she received the Louise Lamont Award for Excellence as well as honors in all areas of performance. She has appeared off-Broadway and performed in the United Kingdom, Poland, Russia, and Malaysia. Among many other plays, she has acted in The Mystery Spot, directed by K alumna Holly Hughes ’77. Carrie is also a teaching artist with Roundabout. You can read more about her at her website.

Aaron Saari ’98

Aaron is the new part-time pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Yellow Springs, Ohio. A bible scholar and theologian, Aaron is the author of The Many Deaths of Judas Iscariot, a book about the historical figure and the issue of suicide. He has been a visiting professor at Xavier and an adjunct instructor at Antioch University Midwest, teaching courses in writing, Christianity, and non-western religions.

Kate Markiewicz ’04

Kate has been named a senior fellow by the Knowles Science Teaching Foundation. KSTF fellowships support teachers of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Kate teaches at Boston Latin School in Boston, Mass. She graduated from K with a B.A. in chemistry and physics. She studied ion-selective electrodes in Kalamazoo, modeled solar coronal loops at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC, and worked with graduate students in a chemistry lab in Erlangen, Germany.

Kate moved to Boston to pursue graduate work in chemistry at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). During her first year there, Kate worked as a teaching assistant. “Working with students was extremely rewarding and was what I enjoyed most.” Kate left MIT to work as a substitute teacher in the Boston Public School System and as head coach for the Boston Latin School Science Olympiad team. “I discovered that high school students were a lot of fun.”

Kate completed her master’s degree in education through the Boston Teacher Residency and the University of Massachusetts-Boston and began teaching full time at Boston Latin School in 2007. Kate has presented the results of her teacher research at the 2008, 2009, and 2010 National Science Teachers Association Conferences in Boston, New Orleans and Philadelphia, respectively.