Sally (Warner) Read ’08

Sally is the new head of the Kazoo School, a preschool through 8th grade private school in Kalamazoo. She wrote a blog post in the autumn that touched on the subjects of family, home, reunions, and the magic of entering an elementary school as an adult: “Because I work in one every day, I often forget what a magical experience it is to enter an elementary school as an adult. We are instantly transported to an earlier time–hopefully a happy time–of pencil shavings and kickball, backpacks and circle gatherings.” The post also says some very nice things about the pull of one’s alma mater. Sally graduated with bachelor’s degree in psychology, and she studied abroad in Caceres, Spain. Sally’s husband, Courtney Read, graduated as a member of the class of 2006. He majored in history and studied abroad in Erlangen, Germany.

K Journey; Space Journey

It is a very long trip from Yazd, Iran, to Kalamazoo. But in 2010 Mojtaba Akhavan-Tafti ’15 was able to negotiate its many twists and turns, as well as making the cultural adjustments associated with the journey. Now, five years later, he’s graduated from Kalamazoo College with majors in physics and chemistry.

Mojtaba Akhavan-Tafti ’15 in front of the building where he spent a great deal of time during his undergraduate studies.

Next he will turn his full-time attention to an even longer odyssey—the 93 million miles traveled by the sun’s solar winds. When those winds arrive at Earth, our atmosphere and magnetic field usually deflect them. They re-converge, however, on the night side of our planet, where some interesting things take place, including the creation of what are called flux ropes.

Those are the phenomena and that is the field (magnetospheric physics, to be exact) that Mojtaba is studying at the University of Michigan this fall as he starts work on his Ph.D.

According to him, such a rarified area of inquiry would never have been possible had he not come halfway around the world to Kalamazoo College.

Yazd, a city of more than a million people, is situated in central Iran, about 300 miles south of Tehran. Mojtaba graduated from high school there, and even started college. But then he had conversations with his uncle, Hashem Akhavan-Tafti, who had come to the states after the fall of the Shah, then graduated from K in 1982 (and is now a member of College’s board of trustees).

His uncle encouraged Mojtaba to make the same migration, even though both men knew the journey involved a great many steps. The first was to obtain a visa to enter the United States. Because the U.S. doesn’t have an embassy in Iran, Mojtaba had to travel to Turkey to file his application. He couldn’t leave Iran, however, until its government permitted him to do so.

Once he obtained his visa Mojtaba relocated to Howell, Michigan. There he spent three months on a farm with his uncle and Aunt SuzAnne. She is the person he most credits for helping with his acclimation to the West. “She is my best friend and the best mentor I could have asked for.”

A precondition for Mojtaba enrolling at K was improving his ability to speak and write English. To do so, he took an English class at Western Michigan University, then took what is called the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), a standardized proficiency test for non-native speakers wishing to enroll in an American university or college.

Once he received word that he’d passed, he was set to begin his studies at K in the fall of 2011. By that time he’d been in America for more a year and was, well, more than ready.

Before classes started, however, he embarked upon his LandSea adventure. “That was a big learning experience for me,” he recalls. “I made some of my best friends during that time.”

Although naturally outgoing, Mojtaba says that his biggest challenge has been to become more social. “Just to become comfortable and act normal, to be likeable. I’ve learned the value of a smile.”

When told that his smile and the twinkle of his eye bear a resemblance to those of tennis great Roger Federer, Mojtaba nods and says, “Yeah, I’m told that from time to time, especially by the guys on the tennis team.”

From the beginning, his studies at K have focused on the sciences. He spent the summer after his first year at Wayne State University working in a neuroscience lab. His foreign study—in Lancaster, England—involved particle physics.

“The sky is no longer a limit!”

Jan Tobochnik, the Dow Distinguished Professor in the Natural Sciences, has been impressed with Mojtaba. “He is a very outgoing young man, very personable. He loves to organize things. For example, he was part of an effort to get the College to put solar panels on the golf carts we use on campus.”

Mojtaba also helped organize K’s first Complex Science Society. “It’s to help bridge the gap between social sciences and empirical sciences,” he explains. “During our first year we focused on renewable energy. During the second we dealt with vaccination practices in the U.S.”

He also was involved in establishing a local chapter of the National Society of Physics Students. That work led to him and others into local elementary schools to encourage young children to pursue science.

For his Senior Individualized Project (SIP) Mojtaba studied the atmospheres of Earth and Mercury, two of the planets in our solar system with magnetic poles. His SIP received departmental honors.

He spent his SIP summer of 2014 at the University of Michigan with his advisor, Professor J.A. Slavin, and studied physical phenomena such as ‘magnetic reconnection’ and ‘coronal mass ejections.’

Because of his SIP work, NASA invited Mojtaba to attend the launch of its Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission.

As a result of that experience he was invited to attend the March, 2015, launch of a NASA mission at Cape Canaveral. The Magnetospheric MultiScale mission carried four identical satellites that, once deployed, gather information about the Earth’s magnetosphere. Mojtaba had worked with data from a similar spacecraft for his SIP.

The original plan was to view the launch, with others, from a favored site on NASA grounds. That hope was scuttled, however, when officials realized that Mojtaba was an Iranian national.

“They told me I’d have to watch from across the harbor instead. But at least Professor Slavin went with me. Even from there, it was still stunning to watch.”

When he’s needed a break from school work, Mojtaba has sometimes retreated to nature. “I really enjoy going to the Lillian Anderson Arboretum. It is a good place to heal.”

Mojtaba’s post-graduate studies will focus on the data coming from those four spacecraft. “Solar winds have the potential to overwhelm our technological civilization. If we could predict when that was going to happen we could take preventive measures to reduce the likelihood of a problem. I also hope to get involved in designing instruments for future missions.”

On a different note, pun intended, he has begun taking violin lessons.

Mojtaba soon hopes to achieve another goal—becoming an American citizen. He intends to make America his permanent home.

“While two decades of living in and facing the challenges of growing up in a developing country prepared me for working hard,” he says, “coming to the U.S. and obtaining a liberal arts education enabled me to broaden the scope of my understanding as well as the impact I can have as an individual and as a citizen. Today, more than five years after my first time entering the U.S., I have come to believe that even the sky is no longer a limit!”

Mojtaba also hopes to help other students the way he was helped. “My aunt and uncle have established a scholarship institute called ‘The 1for2 Education Foundation.’ It means that a recipient of the scholarship commits to pay for the education of two others. My aunt and uncle helped me, so I want to help others someday.”

Come Home

Homecoming fun in 2014, ready to be matched or topped in 2015.

One of the most special times to be a part of the action on campus is during Homecoming weekend. Some of us, like my colleagues on the Alumni Association Executive Board (AAEB), are fortunate to be on campus several times a year. When was the last time you came home to Kalamazoo College?

Homecoming at Kalamazoo College can mean many different things… fall colors in the Midwest, football games, the Hornet 5K run. For me, it’s about connecting with old friends, making new connections, and reconnecting with my alma mater.

“[It] is your chance to come home, to see what feels the same and to discover new connections.”

The AAEB would like to welcome you back to K every year for Homecoming. This year’s festivities occur October 23 through October 25. But it doesn’t have to be your reunion year for you to come to campus and feel the energy of a new academic year. After all, it’s likely you knew far more K students than just the members of your immediate class year! The campus is buzzing with activities of all kinds, and the city of Kalamazoo is a vibrant community.

Happenings worth your return include departmental gatherings, at which you can connect with professors and alumni who shared your major and various opportunities to see new buildings on campus or visit old haunts.

The AAEB sponsors two very special Friday evening events for alumni during Homecoming weekend. The first is a networking reception that informally gathers current students with alumni, faculty, and staff. Alumni share stories of their own career paths, listen and learn from others’ work experiences, and explore professional possibilities both local and global.

The second event is the Alumni Awards ceremony where we honor the achievements and service of fellow graduates. These special awards include recognition of a younger alumna or alumnus who has accomplished a lot in the first several years of life after K.

We welcome and encourage any and all alums to attend both of these events and the many other fun activities throughout Homecoming. That weekend is your chance to come home, to see what feels the same and to discover new connections.

A campout of families can also be an informal class reunion! The adults gathered are (l-r) Miguel Aguirre, April Riker ’97, Karen Reed ’97, Michael Ejercito, Chirst Altman ’97, Alexandra (Foley) Altman ’97, Paula Feddor Frantz ’97, Mark Frantz, Angela Pratt Geffre ’97, and Dan Geffre. And the kids are (l-r) Santiago Aguirre; Felicity, Sierra and Dante Ejercito; Maeve Altman; Max and Ryan Frantz; and Connor Geffre. The dog is Ramona Ejercito. (Photo courtesy of Michael Ejercito)

So whether your reunion is right around the corner or several years out, Homecoming 2015 will provide opportunities to stay connected with one another other and with our alma mater.

And if you aren’t able to get back to campus as often as you like, we encourage you to seek ways to connect in your local community. From regional events like Hornet Happy Hours to being a part of a career fair or recruitment event, there are ways to engage with K and your fellow alumni close to your home. The AAEB has created a menu of Alumni Bites to outline the many opportunities.

And in those interims between local and regional events and our class reunions on campus, we can always find each other and stay connected through the alumni directory, alumni Facebook pages, and occasional informal gatherings with groups of K friends.

I recently spent a weekend camping with my K roommate and several other K friends and their families (together we now total 18!). It felt like no time had passed, and our bonds with each other and our alma mater were reinforced. I know we will stay connected and see each other in between, but it makes me that much more excited for our next reunion!

If there are other ways you would like to connect with Kalamazoo College or the AAEB directly, please let us know at We’d love to hear your ideas for events at Homecoming and in your area!

Bee Man, Bee Artists

An example of honeycomb and etching by Ladislav Hanka ’75 and his bees.

Ladislav Hanka ’75 has a mind that buzzes with constant activity, always attracted to the sweetness of an idea with a twist. His degree is in biology, and his love of the natural world is evident in his art. His etchings, prints, and drawings illustrate the intricacies and mystery of nature: craggy trees, elegant fish, round-bellied frogs, fierce raptors and delicate song birds, dank mushrooms, the occasional napping old dog.

So the idea of combining living bees and his etchings seemed, well, natural. He saw it as collaboration.

Some five years ago, a friend had given him a box of bees.

“There was a little bit of sugar water in there, something like mosquito netting, and the bees were climbing around inside the box,” Hanka says. “And I thought, so cute! Like having a puppy!” He laughs. “Suddenly, I was a parent. It was on that level of forethought that I became a beekeeper.”

Where the idea came from to place his etchings inside the beehives, among the living bees, Hanka can’t say.

“Who knows where ideas come from,” he shrugs. “You wake up some night, and there it is. It seems such a simple idea, too, but I’d never seen anyone do it. So I put the etching in after soaking the paper in hot beeswax, brushing it on, and the bees seem to like that paper. Typically, they start on the chunks of old, recycled beeswax and avoid the lines of the etching. Perhaps it’s the flavor? Or the waxy aromatic paper?  Otherwise they tend to chew up and destroy any foreign substance intruding on their hives. Then again, they may just be critics.” Hanka grins.

Standing in his studio, a building he constructed where the garage once stood at his residence in Kalamazoo, just a few blocks from Kalamazoo College, he leans in close to take a look at his etchings. He has them lined up in a row on a small ledge along the end wall. The etchings closely match what he exhibited in ArtPrize 2014 in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

ArtPrize is an annual art competition judged both by popular vote and a jury. This past summer more than 1,500 artists from across the world exhibited their work in and around downtown Grand Rapids. Hanka’s panoramic etching in ArtPrize 2011 won the Curator’s Choice award and was purchased by the Grand Rapids Art Museum for its permanent collection.

The co-artist shows some the collaborative works.

Hanka’s 2014 ArtPrize entry, “Great Wall of Bees: Intelligence of the Beehive,” is his third since the competition’s inception. Contained inside a glass case along the length of a wall just inside the entrance of the Urban Institute of Contemporary Art (UICA), live bees buzzed and danced and chewed over three rows of Hanka’s etchings—detailed images of toads, salmon, trees, insects, birds—building honeycomb along the curves of his lines, indeed in surprising collaboration.

Great Wall of Bees was collaborative art and environmental message. In a description of his work on the ArtPrize website, he wrote:

“The additions bees make to the etchings are as inevitably elegant as the gently curving veils of honeycomb you find hanging from the domed ceilings within a bee tree. There is an undeniable intelligence at work in a beehive. You learn to respect that and care about these highly evolved creatures, which brings me inescapably around to bees being in trouble—not just here but worldwide.

“The cause of bee die-offs is hardly a mystery. It’s much like the growth in cancer rates. No single factor causes it. The crisis is due to a summation of assaults on the organism, until it’s all too much. Bees face a gauntlet of toxins, habitat loss, electromagnetic pollution, exotic diseases and imported parasites. …”

Hanka’s living exhibit drew a great deal of attention. He estimates that 80,000 to 100,000 persons viewed the Great Wall of Bees. His work was short-listed in the top 25 in both popular and juried categories for three-dimensional entries.

“For the three weeks of the exhibit, I was the bee-man,” says Hanka. “I heard people talking about the bees in cafes and on the street.  People still come to talk to me about the artwork and the bees, even though the show is over.”

“For the three weeks of the exhibit, I was the bee-man.”

It was profoundly gratifying, he says, to interact with the public coming to see his art and to watch the bees build their honeycomb around it. Bees crawled along the glass where children pressed their noses for a closer look. Some expressed concern over dying insects, and it gave Hanka a chance to explain something about the four-week life cycle of a bee and the difference between natural daily die-offs versus the massive losses bees currently suffer in beehives everywhere.

The hands of collaborative art makers.

He dips a bare hand into one of his hives, set in a circle beside his house, and the bees emerge, almost lazily, spinning a hum of circles around Hanka’s head and landing on him. They swarm over his bare hands and land in his beard.

“They are not aggressive with me,” Hanka says. “Frame of mind is important. They respond much like any animal would. You have to be sensitive to their mood and show some respect..”

The bees do sting him occasionally, he says, especially when stressed, but Hanka shrugs it off. All a part of the art and all part of the natural order of things. As for the way the insects weave their intricate combs along his drawings, Hanka shrugs about that, too.

“I try to be realistic about that, how much intelligence is in the bee,” he says. “There is a spirit. I have no explanation for some of it.”

Hanka considers ArtPrize carefully, now that the citywide exhibit is done, his wall of bees packed up and brought back to the hive again. During subsequent weeks he contemplated the moment of fame.

“The space is clean and no evidence remains of the effort invested,” he says. “Honey gathering and art are both among the first recorded events in the mists of human history.  My work invited  people to partake of genuine, unfalsified sacraments.  I saw they were truly moved by the beauty they encountered and by their concern for the fate of bees.”

Landing on the competition’s short lists gave him a few seductive moments of contemplating the financial prize (ArtPrize awards two grand prizes worth $400,000, and eight category awards worth $160,000). Those moments quickly evaporated in the final stages of the competition.

“Of course, there was a build-up and then disappointment,” Hanka nods. “Though we may ardently desire the accolades and money these votes confer, it isn’t why we make art.”

What remains, Hanka says, is the message he wanted to deliver: the interaction he had with his audience and his art, the near-mystical experience he had with another tiny life form. He acknowledges the influences that have remained with him from his years at Kalamazoo College, where he studied with Marcia Wood, Johannes Von Gumppenberg, Peter Jogo, and Bernard Palchick (all former professors in the art department). Equally, in biology, he credits Professors Paul Olexia, David Evans, and Fred Cichocki.

“I still keep in contact with many of them, and I value their influence in my life,” Hanka says. Ideas, he believes, are born in the buzz of many minds working at their purpose; they are built one upon another.

Hanka walks between the aisles of his beehives in the same way he walks between the tables in his studio. Both are covered with pieces of his work. He leans forward to study a detail, and then he leans back to contemplate the whole.

He is done with this particular project, this artistic collaboration with the bees that carried over years. Now, the bees will return to what they do best: making honey. The artist will let his mind spin and dream and buzz a little, until it lands on his next big idea.

Fast Track

Sally (Warner) Read ’08 wastes no time. Two months after graduation from Kalamazoo College she began taking doctoral classes in education at Michigan State University. And in seven short years she she’s landed her dream job as head of the Kazoo School, a private, independent, progressive school less than two miles from K.

Sally Read, blessed with one of the great surnames for a head of a school.

“It’s all been a whirlwind, and I have a lot of learning to do as I figure things out,” said Sally.

Like many first-year K students, Sally was open to many post-graduate possibilities. She did know that she loved children and wanted to change the world. During a pre-admission visit to K, she sat in on her sister’s (Becky Warner ’04) developmental psychology class and knew that she wanted to major in that field.

During her first quarter she became a self-described “Dr. [Siu-Lan] Tan [Professor of Psychology] groupie” and signed up to be a teaching assistant for her, which she did throughout her four years at K. Sally particularly enjoyed the co-authorship program at the Woodward School where K students help the children write and illustrate fictional stories.

“She challenged me to do better and think more deeply.”

“I loved Dr. Tan’s class, even though I was a little scared of her,” said Sally. “She really challenged me to do better and to think more deeply than I ever had before.”

Sally’s Senior Individualized Project occurred at the University of Texas (Dallas) where she conducted research on social aggression for the Friendship Project, a longitudinal research project about aggression among children. Sally analyzed the Project’s data bases to discover how gender differences affected the children’s self-reports of social and physical victimization. Going to Dallas was also an opportunity to be with her boyfriend and future husband, Courtney Read ’06.

Near the end of her K experience Sally decided that a career in education made sense for her, and she applied for and was accepted into a Ph.D. program in teacher education at Michigan State University. At age 21 she was the youngest, most inexperienced student in the program, a fact that didn’t intimidate her at all. If anything, graduate school solidified her tendency toward fearlessness (well cultivated at K) and her passion for learning. Both have served her well in her new job.

During doctoral studies Sally was influenced by two progressive educators whose ideas have become cornerstones for her research and for her work at the Kazoo School. John Dewey (1859-1952) was a philosopher and psychologist who advocated for an education based on democratic principles that would prepare young people to be productive, responsible members of a democratic society. Alfie Kohn (1957- ) advocates the viewpoint that education is effective when the learner actively makes meaning as opposed to absorbing information. Knowledge, argues Kohn, should be taught “in a context and for a purpose.”

For her dissertation Sally interviewed and observed third grade students at the Kazoo School who were working on an election year project. She also followed kindergartners as they learned mathematics through the symmetry and patterns of nature at the nearby Kleinstuck Nature Preserve.

“I immediately fell in love with Kazoo School,” said Sally. “Progressive schools often get a bad name for being laissez-faire. My research focused on seeing what progressive education looks like in a real, 21st-century school. I wanted to know how teachers find meaning in their work when they are given the autonomy to teach and learn without the use of a standardized test.”

Sally’s first job after receiving her doctorate was at the Eton Academy in Birmingham, Michigan, an alternative school that specializes in working with students who have learning disabilities. She liked the experience and planned to stay at Eton to teach Spanish. Destiny intervened. Sally received a call from the former Kazoo School board chairperson who invited her to become the interim head of school (for the 2014-15 academic year) and to apply for the permanent position.

At first Sally declined.

“What do you do if you’re 27, and you’re offered your dream job?” said Sally. “I didn’t feel ready for it.”

Then she did a lot of soul searching and sought out the advice of her mentors. She concluded that she would regret missing this opportunity if she didn’t apply.

“I lived and breathed Kazoo School during my dissertation, and I liked it,” said Sally. “It was really what I was looking for in a school: small classes; children’s art everywhere; a spirit of collaboration among students, teachers and parents; and, of course, a vision of the school that I believed in.”

Kazoo School has 96 children in grades pre-kindergarten to eighth grade and it employs 18 full- and part-time teachers. Since 1972 the school has focused on challenging and nurturing children to become independent thinkers and lifelong learners in an environment that seeks academic excellence, social responsibility, and respect for others.

One of Sally’s favorite things to do at school is to interact with the students. She leads school assemblies on Friday mornings and talks with students in the halls. She also sees students at work when she visits classrooms to evaluate teachers. While most teachers fret over evaluations, Kazoo School teachers are comfortable with having Sally come to their classes. They know she misses being with the children, and that takes the edge off her official business.

“The children here are so awesome,” she said. “I take as many opportunities as I can to visit their classrooms and interact with them. The pre-kindergarteners are especially excited to see me. They call me ‘Dr. Sally.’”

Sally enjoys meeting with the children for another reason.

“It’s interesting to see how much they have changed and grown from the few short years ago when I was doing research here,” she said. “I can’t wait to see what they’ll look like a few years from now.

Although the new job has been exciting, Sally admits it hasn’t been easy. In her first month, the office assistant left. A short time later she hired a new business manager. One fine fall day she had a flood in the school basement that began on Friday at 4 P.M. Late in her first fall she had to call an early snow day. Sally got through it all—and she conducted her first fund-raising campaign.

The school had not done a big annual fund drive before, but Sally decided to try it. The results? More than $100,000 and an 80 percent parent participation rate, both significant increases from previous years. The key to her success?

“Follow-up, a great team of parent volunteers, and, more follow-up, with a personal touch,” she said. “I learned a lot about the culture of giving from my time at K.”

Although Sally’s academic background isn’t specifically in educational administration, she has turned out to be a natural leader who uses a collaborative approach with her parents, teachers, and the school’s board of directors. This style has worked well for her at a school where only two teachers are younger than she is.

“There are so many decisions to make all the time, which can be tiring,” she said. “I have been strategic in how I’ve chosen to approach it.”

Sally promised teachers she wanted to make everyone successful by drawing on everyone’s expertise rather than telling people what to do. She set up a shared file of expertise on Google Docs. And she readily consults with teachers whose long experience (15 to 20 years) at Kazoo School has given them deep institutional knowledge of the place.

Sally’s journey has combined vision, hard work, mentoring, and the execution of a plan. It all just happened quicker than she anticipated. Last May, the board of Kazoo School named Sally permanent Head of School.

Just Fight

When the stresses of the day get to be too much, Mia Henry gets into the gym and kicks. She kicks hard. She’s a kickboxer.

“I joined the gym to work out my frustrations, and I thought it was better to punch and kick a bag rather than channel them elsewhere,” says Henry. And then she smiles, her face lighting up with kindness.

Mia enjoys the brave new space of the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership.

Henry is the executive director of Arcus Center of Social Justice Leadership at Kalamazoo College (ACSJL). She took the position in a little over a year ago, after Kalamazoo College conducted a national search for a leader to follow Jaime Grant. Henry’s character combines tough empathy with the ability to fight for justice, a perfect combination for a social justice leader.

“I often use the metaphor of boxing when I speak about social justice,” Henry says. “Boxing is difficult, challenging but cathartic. I couldn’t land a solid hit until I got into shape. Freedom fighting is still fighting: you need training first. You need technique and you need to know your strategy in order to achieve change.”

When a recruiter contacted Henry about the Kalamazoo College position, she was intrigued.

“So many social justice organizations are focused on a single political issue or one specific cause,” Henry says. “ACSJL is able to look at the big picture and reflect on what leadership looks like.”

Henry’s road to Kalamazoo has taken many turns, with a starting point in the Deep South.

“I was born in Florida, grew up in Tennessee and Alabama,” she says. “I moved around a lot growing up. My family is mostly in Alabama now, but when I got older, I wanted nothing more than to teach in the big city. I wanted to live in a place of diversity and teach social studies, so I sent out résumés to all the high schools in the most diverse areas of Chicago and drove up with a friend who also wanted to teach.”

Arriving in her goal city, Chicago, Henry walked into one high school after another on her list, applying for teaching jobs. She was hired as a social studies teacher at Roald Amundsen High School.

“No matter what job I’ve held since, I still think of myself as an educator,” Henry says.

The iconography of the ACJSL is a study in collaboration and equality.

Her position at ACSJL will include maintaining and augmenting the vision for the Center; developing programming and partnerships with local, national, and international organizations; raising the profile of the Center and the College nationally and internationally; and working with K faculty, staff, and students on innovative projects and practices in social justice leadership. The Center is on the very threshold of its second biennial Global Prize for Transformative Social Justice Leadership.

“I liked that here the interdependence and contexts of social justice issues are stressed and studied,” she says. “That’s rare.”

In her first months at ACSJL, Henry listened carefully to the Kalamazoo and Kalamazoo College communities. She placed herself first in the role of student, learning, absorbing, considering carefully what she has heard.

“Freedom fighting is still fighting: you need training first.”

“People here have been very open with their discomfort,” she says. “No one thinks we can solve everything. Students have said to me, ‘Mia, we’ll never get rid of racism!’ But then I tell them to think of what we do here as medicine to fight disease. There will always be disease, and we will always have to fight it.”

As a girl, Henry listened to her mother tell stories of segregated schools in the Deep South. Her mother was one of only seven African-American children attending an otherwise white school.

“My mother would show me her school yearbooks, and she could still remember, point out each photo, this child treated her well, this child did not,” says Henry. “It was from my parents that I learned the values of justice, and that revolution begins at home, by treating people well. I was fortunate to have a family willing to have those hard conversations with me and tease out ideas about how we might change the world.”

From her parents Henry learned to admire people who were kind and who lead with love, she says, even while being angry at the injustices in the world.

“It’s the injustice that makes me angry,” she says, “more than the people behind it. I believe in the human capacity for change.”

With the building that houses ACSJL being so new and unique (it is the first architecture in the world designed specifically to reflect a mission of social justice leadership), Henry has assigned to herself the mission to help the community embrace ACSJL as its own.

“I want people to understand that ACSJL belongs to them,” she says.

Although what attracted Henry to ACSJL was its generalist approach to social injustice, she acknowledges a place in her own heart for one particular cause.

“Mass incarceration,” she nods. Along with several other boards, she serves on the board of directors for Community Justice for Youth Institute in Chicago, an organization that works to develop alternatives to incarceration. The profiling, she says, the disproportionate arrests, and the treatment that people receive when incarcerated—these are the causes that move her most to work for change.

As part of her personal work for her chosen cause, Henry visited an Illinois prison and learned about abuses within the prison system, including torture.

“It’s hard to hear about these kinds of things,” she acknowledges. “We don’t want to believe this about ourselves. But it happens.”

Hearing the ugly stories, having the difficult conversations, however, are a part of what leads to positive change, she says.

“My approach to my work at Kalamazoo College comes from a place of love. I love people, all people, enough to fight for them. One person’s values don’t have to be at the expense of another’s values.”

Embracing the call for leadership is liberation, Henry says. “Here, I want to nurture leadership. My hope is that at Kalamazoo College every student, staff and faculty has the tools to apply a social justice lens to their work.  Doing so is critical for enlightened leadership and thus deeply embedded in the Kalamazoo College mission.”

The Training of a Champion
ACSJL requires a special kind of leadership. Mia Henry had the rich and varied work experience Kalamazoo College sought for its commitment to social justice leadership, and she has since proved to be the perfect fit.

•    Henry has served on the national leadership team for Black Space, an initiative of Safe Places for the Advancement of Community and Equity (SPACEs). SPACEs supports intergenerational groups of community leaders working for racial equity across the United States.
•    Henry was associate director of Mikva Challenge, a nonprofit in Chicago working with 50 area high schools that involves young people in the political process through action civics.
•    Henry worked as a senior consultant for youth development at the University of Chicago. She taught youth development classes at the University of Illinois at Chicago and was a program coordinator for City University of New York, monitoring college enrollment, student achievement, and parent outreach initiatives.
•    Henry worked with the Chicago Freedom School (CFS), an organization that provides training and education opportunities for youth and adult allies to develop leadership skills through the lens of civic action and through the study of the history of social movements and their leaders.
•    Henry founded Reclaiming South Shore for All, a grassroots group committed to institutionalizing systems that promote peace, youth leadership, and political accountability. She also owns and operates Freedom Lifted, a small business that provides civil rights tours.

Henry’s experience has provided her a tool kit of empathy and understanding as well as the hands-on experience that has honed her ability to know what works and what doesn’t. She has worked with youth and adults, helping them to approach and solve their problems, personally and academically.

Henry earned a B.S. degree in sociology and criminal justice from Rutgers University and an M.S. Ed. degree in secondary education from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

Grace Work

A few blocks down the hill from the Kalamazoo College campus, in an upstairs office, the headquarters of International Child Care (ICC) is located. ICC is a Christian health development organization that has been providing health services for children and families in Haiti and the Dominican Republic for half a century. Since 2012, it has sponsored a six-week summer internship for K students, and now it employs K alumna Suzanne Curtiss ’14 as its communications director. All describe the time they spent at ICC as life-changing.

Amy Jimenez ’14 helps weigh a baby during public health work in Haitian communities.

Three of the interns, Roxann Lawrence ’14, Amy Jimenez ’14, and Zoe Beaudry ’14, spent their six weeks in Haiti; Avery Allman ’16 and Curtiss worked in the Kalamazoo office. From ICC, each says, they learned a new appreciation of the difficulties inherent in providing aid to severely challenged nations, as well as a new respect for the spirit, resilience, and creativity of the people who live in those countries. They also saw the principles of social justice and sustainability at work.

Lawrence and Jimenez interned together during the summer of 2012. Their experiences were based at Grace Children’s Hospital in Port-au-Prince. Grace, ICC’s flagship program, has been providing inpatient and outpatient care for Haitian children and families since 1967. Although its main inpatient building was destroyed in the earthquake of 2010, Grace continues to serve about 300 inpatients a year and more than 400 outpatients per day.

From the hospital Lawrence and Jimenez moved out into the communities, many of them still just tent cities since the quake, helping health teams that weighed babies, visited patients, and educated families about birth control, nutrition, and sanitation. The two also gave tours to visiting groups from North America and prepared a pre-orientation package for new visitors.

Roxann Lawrence ’14 (right) and friend.

Lawrence is a native of Westmoreland, Jamaica, and she majored in anthropology/sociology and theatre arts. When she returned to Michigan from Haiti, she said, “Without a doubt, this has been the best summer of my life.”

Jimenez, an anthropology/sociology major from Compton, California, concurs. During her internship, she helped develop a program for children with disabilities. Because the cultures of Haiti and the Dominican Republic equate disability with shame, most of these children are hidden away by their families. The first challenge of ICC’s health care teams, therefore, is to find them; then they work with parents, teaching them to help their children maximize their functioning. Jimenez went to the tiny home of a single mother of a child who couldn’t use his hands. “He was such a happy child. He ate and wrote using his feet.” To Jimenez, the boy represented the spirit of the Haitian people. “They have experienced so many bad things, but they are a resilient people.” She also learned how important it is to do research when you’re trying to help, and “not to just impose your own style on other cultures.”

Zoe Beaudry spent her ICC internship in Haiti in 2013. The East Lansing (Mich.) native earned her K degree in studio art with a minor in sociology/anthropology, Beaudry is from East Lansing, Michigan. She job shadowed a sociologist at Grace, learning about his research into the mental health of people in Port-au-Prince. She also conducted art workshops for children at the hospital, compiling their drawings into a book titled “Waiting for Grace.”

Beaudry said, “Living in Port-au-Prince felt like a whirlwind of confusion and culture clash.” Like many people visiting Haiti for the first time, she found, “it was a new experience feeling so different from the rest of the people around me. It forced me to confront feelings of internalized racism and prejudice – which was a very valuable experience and an eye-opener.” She found that meeting Christian missionaries at the guest house where she stayed in Port-au-Prince, “led me to a strong interest in Christianity and religion in general.”

Both Allman and Curtiss did their ICC internships in Kalamazoo. A double major (business and Spanish language and literature), Allman used her internship to focus on marketing and development; she helped with grant writing, created marketing plans, wrote a history of ICC, and publicized its annual cycling fundraising event. She says that the experience had “an incredibly positive effect on me.”

Allman also believes that staying in Kalamazoo for those six summer weeks was a highlight. A native of Northville, Michigan, she took advantage of the opportunity to learn more about the Kalamazoo community and its nonprofit services.

“[It is important to] not just impose your own style on other cultures.”

A native of Saginaw, Michigan, Curtiss majored in English at K and became interested in public relations during her sophomore year. As a student, she worked in K’s Office of College Communication. Her own internship was structured to give her experiences in writing and event promotion. These experiences taught her how cultural differences can make it difficult to work internationally, she said, but they also greatly broadened her horizons. She learned firsthand how to generate publicity on a budget, as well as the ins-and-outs of working with local media.

She started her new job with ICC just one week after graduating from K, and she is now responsible for educating and engaging the public about the organization. Her job description includes not only public and media relations, but also planning encounter trips for North American groups who want to see ICC projects in the Caribbean.

Curtiss took her first trip to Haiti and the Dominican Republic a month after she started her new job. “You can’t begin to comprehend the level of need until you see it,” she said. “The people are so kind and joyful and have a strong sense of national pride.” She also was struck by the passion of the ICC staff in both countries (all in-country positions are staffed by nationals): “They love the work they do.”

Suzanne Curtiss ’14 and Keith Mumma in ICC’s Kalamazoo office.

Keith Mumma has been associated with ICC since 1989. After spending several years volunteering, he became a board member and, in 2005, he was named the U.S. national director. Mumma still does some professional photography (his previous career), with Kalamazoo College as one of his clients. It was this connection that led Mumma to develop the ICC internship position in 2012. It’s been a good match, he said. “Both organizations have the same philosophy on life.”

ICC offers interns a wide variety of experiences, ranging from social justice to economics, pre-med, anthropology, marketing , as well as French (the official language of Haiti) and Spanish (spoken in the Dominican Republic). Mumma says that K interns have been an important part of ICC staffing. “They’ve all been self-starters,” he says, “and we need people who are independent workers.” Several of the students had already studied abroad by the time they came to ICC, and the international experience they brought with them was invaluable.

Roxann Lawrence summarized her ICC internship. It helped her, she said, “to see social justice working through an international perspective, reinforcing the importance of community participatory service to community development and change.” Her experiences, she concluded, “will continue to have a positive impact on me as I passionately pursue a life dedicated to serving and working with marginalized groups.”

Suzanne Curtiss added, “The spirit of ICC flows into the integrity of K.”

Alumni Bites Sampler

On behalf of the Alumni Association Executive Board, thank you for your appetite to be an engaged alumni community. During homecoming, AAEB introduced new ways to give back our alma mater, based upon your schedule and your appetite for engagement. This a la carte menu—a.k.a. Alumni Bites— provides an offering of small, medium and large engagement opportunities—a.k.a. bites—in admission, career development, and alumni relations.

Below is a sampler, highlighting just a few fellow alums whose hunger led them to select a bite that suits their busy lives. We hope it will inspire you to take a look at Alumni Bites and think about what bite will satisfy your hunger to give back to K.

Hungry? Please visit our AAEB page to learn more about the Bites.

Small Bite: Attend a Hornet Happy Hour
Menu Area: Alumni Relations
Alumnus: Tendai Mudyiwa, class of 2014
Major(s): Math, Computer Science
Lives in: New York, New York

“It’s been a good resource for advice …. It’s always great to hear K alumni share their experiences.”

Tendai Mudyiwa ’14 came to K as an international student from Zimbabwe and got involved in campus life, including serving as a President’s Ambassador. After graduation, Tendai moved to New York City to work at Morgan Stanley as a technology associate. A young alum and new to New York, Tendai noted  that, “the happy hour experience has given me the opportunity to reconnect with alumni I know as well as meet others. It’s been a good resource for advice (career and social, things to do in the city). It’s always great to hear K alumni share their experiences.”

There are now nearly thirty happy hours that occur each term—from Kalamazoo to Los Angeles to London.  As Tendai has found, these events are a great way to connect with alumni in your area in a fun, informal setting. Check out the events page for a happy hour near you. The next event occurs on Wednesday, July 22.

Medium Bite: Send congratulatory notes to admitted students
Menu Area: Admission
Alumnus: Chris Wozniak, class of 1993
Major(s): Economics & Business, English
Lives in: Denver, Colorado

Chris Wozniak ’93

The K community may not have a large Colorado contingent just yet, but Denver alumnus Chris Wozniak ’93 is helping to change that by partnering with the admission department. Chris has attended college fairs, Swarm events, and most recently he wrote congratulatory notes to admitted students. Participating in these experiences during the admission cycle can make a profound impact with a minimal investment o time; it also helps to emphasize the personal connections that characterize the K community as a student and as an alum.

Chris believes what many of us have found to be true: giving of our time and experience is something that we enjoy doing. He noted that by engaging through actions that impact others, alumni can continue to exemplify one of the key components of the K-Plan—experiential education. Through his work with admission Chris stays educated on what’s happening at K and continues to reflect on his own K experience and how K remains very relevant to his current life path.

The Alumni Admission Volunteer Program is a great way to learn about the many opportunities to help recruit prospective students. Interested?

Large Bite: Host a discovery externship/provide a summer internship opportunity
Menu Area: Career Development
Alumna: Debra (Tokarski) Yourick, class of 1980
Major(s): Health Sciences
Lives in: Silver Spring, Maryland

Deb Yourick ’80

Deb Yourick ’80 has been actively engaged in career development for more than 12 years—hosting her first externs in 2003. What started as a great way to give back and engage with students has now become a passion for Deb and her family. Deb remains determined to find ways to fuse her love of science with her love for K in order to help students engage with science and science education. Deb is director of science education and strategic communications at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. In that role she partnered with a colleague to design a STEM education program that is now army-wide, reaching underserved students to spark their interest in the sciences. Deb’s interns have helped both in the lab and as mentors and teachers in the STEM education program.

Deb finds K students’ openness to experience unmatched. With great enthusiasm she noted that her K interns have been “young, energetic students—taking science off a text book page and doing a hands-on experience with young students who may not get this experience.” Externships and internships help students better understand how to apply classroom learning, and they also enrich the lives of alumni who, because they’re K alumni, are engaged in that ongoing learning process. Deb is welcoming back a few of her interns this summer who will be working on their Senior Individualized Projects.

Ready to take a large, life-enriching bite? Contact the Center for Career and Professional Development (CCPD) to learn more!

Alumni Awards
Thank you to Tendai, Chris, and Deb for sharing your stories and bringing to life “More in four. More in a lifetime.”

We want to hear your stories! Each homecoming, the AAEB presents the Distinguished Service Award to an alumni or friend of the College who has made exceptional personal contributions to the College—contributions that may include swallowing one or many of the Alumni Bites. Know someone deserving of this award? We encourage you to submit nominations.

Promise Land

NOTE: Eleven Kalamazoo Promise students matriculated to Kalamazoo College last month (September 2015), members of the class of 2019. Kalamazoo College announced its prospective students’ eligibility for the Promise Scholarship in June of 2014, and this year’s group represents the first at K. K was one of 15 private colleges in the Michigan Colleges Alliance newly Promise eligible. The addition of the 15 MCA member institutions to the 43 Michigan public colleges and universities increases the number of Promise eligible schools to 58 throughout the state. For KPS students who enroll at Kalamazoo College the tuition and fees are fully and jointly funded by the Kalamazoo Promise and by K. The Kalamazoo Promise funds at the level of the undergraduate average tuition and fees for the College of Literature, Science and Arts at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor). K covers any difference between that amount and the amount of its yearly tuition and fees.

For Robert Gorman ’94, M.D., the city of Kalamazoo could be The Promise Land.

The Gorman family may one day include Promise Scholarship beneficiaries who attend Kalamazoo College. From left: Bryn, Jenn, Harper, Rob and Evan Gorman. The photo was taken by Becky Anderson Photography, and Becky Olson Anderson is a K grad (class of 1997).

Nearly 25 years ago, a “promise” (in the form of a scholarship) made by F.W. and Elsie Heyl sent the Loy Norrix High School and Kalamazoo Area Mathematics and Science Center graduate to Kalamazoo College tuition free as a Heyl scholarship recipient.

Fifteen years later, another promise brought him back to Kalamazoo from New Mexico.

In 2005, a group of local philanthropists announced The Kalamazoo Promise, at the time a one-of-a-kind scholarship program that covers 100 percent of the tuition and fees to any Michigan public university or college for every student who attends a Kalamazoo Public School (KPS) from kindergarten to 12th grade (with a sliding scale based on the length of enrollment applying to all other eligible students). Since its inception, the scholarship program (guaranteed in perpetuity) has invested 55 million dollars in more than 3,300 KPS graduates.

It was the actions and generosity of those anonymous donors that would play a role in bringing Gorman and his wife, Jenn, back to his hometown.

“The idea that a community has citizens and benefactors who care so much for it that they would create something like The Promise is incredible,” Gorman says. “That just doesn’t happen everywhere. This place is special.”

The promise that brought him home recently got even more promising.

Beginning with the high school graduating class of 2015, KPS students may use The Promise scholarship to attend Kalamazoo College as well as any one of the other 14 Michigan College Alliance (MCA) liberal arts colleges and universities. The announcement between The Kalamazoo Promise and the MCA was made in June.

“This partnership truly is a winning proposition for all,” says Bob Bartlett, chief executive officer of the MCA. “Promise scholars will benefit from increased college choice throughout the state, and the MCA colleges and universities will be enriched by having these deserving students on their campuses.”

Bob Jorth, executive director of The Kalamazoo Promise, agrees. The addition of Kalamazoo College, specifically, he says, now gives students three distinctly different local choices for higher education. More than 65 percent of Promise scholars attend Western Michigan University or Kalamazoo Valley Community College.

“It’s about giving KPS students more choices and finding the right fit for them,” Jorth says. “We’re extremely happy to have a third ‘neighborhood’ choice for our students. Since the beginning, Kalamazoo College has been a great supporter of The Promise. We’re thrilled to have them on board.”

For K, says the College’s Dean of Admission and Financial Aid Eric Staab, the new partnership is about supporting the community that has supported it for more than 180 years.

“First and foremost, it’s about being a good neighbor,” Staab says. “We wanted to be good stewards and to be a part of this amazing opportunity for KPS students.”

Gorman appreciates the College’s investment in the community and hopes more KPS students will consider K when applying to college.

“I think kids who grow up in Kalamazoo often dismiss K and other local institutions out of a sheer desire to leave town and try something new,” he says. “I would argue that the moment you step on campus you see Kalamazoo College, the city of Kalamazoo, and, indeed, the world, in a completely different way.”

Gorman, who works as an orthopedic surgeon at Bronson HealthCare Midwest in Kalamazoo, and his wife, Jenn, now have three young daughters, Harper, Evan, and Bryn. Their oldest child is in first grade at a Kalamazoo elementary school.

“I grew up in the city of Kalamazoo and was a KPS kid for all of my schooling,” Gorman explains. “When I moved back to town, it was important for me to make my home in the city, to support the local public schools, to contribute to the tax base, and to socially and financially invest in the city.”

As long as Gorman and his wife continue to reside in Kalamazoo, all three of their children would be eligible for The Promise.

Currently, The Kalamazoo Promise donors fund 100 percent of the tuition and fees to any one of the 43 public universities, colleges, and community colleges in the state.

As part of the new agreement with the MCA, full tuition and fees to the MCA schools will be jointly funded by The Kalamazoo Promise and the MCA member institution. The Kalamazoo Promise will fund at the level of the undergraduate tuition and fees for the College of Literature, Science and the Arts at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor—currently the most expensive public school funded by The Kalamazoo Promise.

The MCA member institution will cover the difference between that amount and its yearly tuition and fees. That means Kalamazoo College is investing more than $26,000 a year in a student attending K on The Kalamazoo Promise based on current tuition rates. The costs incurred by the College will not be passed along to other students or affect any financial aid awards.

“It really makes a statement that K, a place that can literally open doors leading to anywhere in the world, is committed to the idea that everyone deserves a chance to have that opportunity, especially young students and families in its backyard,” Gorman says.

The Kalamazoo Promise provides more information at its website [].

Postscript: Like Gorman, author Erin (Miller) Dominianni ’95 lives in Kalamazoo and has children attending Kalamazoo Public Schools. She is thrilled that her children could be in the K classes of 2020 and 2025 respectively, thanks to The Kalamazoo Promise donors.