Archives

Dennis Stover ’66

Dennis was named chief executive officer of enCore Energy Corporation. Dennis has more than 40 years of experience and leadership in the uranium industry. Until his retirement in 2011, he served as executive vice president of Americas for Uranium One, Inc. He earned his B.A. in chemistry at K and studied abroad in Muenster, Germany. He earned his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan. An author of numerous papers regarding in-situ uranium recovery, Dennis has co-authored three International Atomic Energy Agency guidebooks and manuals related to both acidic and alkaline uranium in-situ leach (ISL) technology. He is the author of six United States patents concerning various aspect of in-situ recovery of uranium and reservoir restoration.

Donald Stowe ’56

Don died on September 11, 2014. He was a lifelong resident of Kalamazoo and earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry from K. He was a member of the men’s Hornet tennis team and part of the 1956 undefeated squad. He also helped his father, Allen Stowe (a professor of chemistry at K from 1928 to 1957), run the National Junior Tennis Championships for many years. Don earned a master’s degree from Western Michigan University and was a chemistry teacher at Portage Central High School for 37 years. He also was a longtime tennis coach at the school.  Don’s extraordinary ability in the classroom was recognized by the American Chemical Society (Kalamazoo Section) with a Science Teacher of the Year Award. Don combined his military service with his love of tennis. He served in the United States Army during the Korean War and led his team to the First Infantry Division Tennis Championships in 1954. Don was involved in Boy Scouts and an active member of the Kalamazoo Coalition for the Protection of Children and Families. He had an avid love of photography and computers and designed the first web page for his church. Don is survived by his wife, Jan, their three children, nine grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.

Fred Taschner ’70

Fred retired from Chemical Abstracts Service after 41 years of employment. “My last position was as senior structure input analyst,” he wrote, “mostly responsible for structure input for carbohydrates (sugars) and small peptides. My team did abstracting and structuring for journals and patents reporting synthesis of chemicals containing or using sugars or amino acids/peptides. (For the chemists among you, look at Sections 33/34 of your CAS weekly publication.) In retirement, Gail (who retired from Capital University here in Columbus, Ohio, in 2010) and I will be doing some traveling (we just got back from a Caribbean cruise with Gail’s mother and middle sister) and have plans to follow Ohio State’s men’s and women’s golf teams. Gail continues to work for social justice with our local BREAD (Building Responsibility, Equality, And Dignity) organization. I plan to catch up on all the home projects that need attention–clean the basement, the garage, the computer room, and then it’s yard work season. Plus there is re-reading the public library’s science fiction collection. Part of the travel will be attending this fall’s reunion, so we hope to see lots of old friends there.”

Jacob Meyers ’08

Jacob recently completed his Ph.D. at Colorado State University. He has been conducting research on new approaches to control disease-carrying mosquitoes. His research was described in a paper–“Mosquitocidal properties of IgG targeting the glutamate-gated chloride channel in three mosquito disease vectors (Diptera: Culicidae)”–that was published in the May issue of Journal for Experimental Biology. And his paper was highlighted as the “Editor’s Choice” for that issue of the journal. Despite the fact that malaria mortality rates have fallen steadily since 2000, the disease threatens half the human population and kills one child every minute. Moreover, resistance in mosquitoes to the primary pesticide used to control them is increasing. A new mosquitocidal candidate has arisen in an old drug, ivermectin, which has been successfully used against parasitic worms that cause diseases such as onchocerciasis (River Blindness). However, little was known about the process by which ivermectin worked against mosquitoes. Jacob’s research elucidated the site (called the glutamate-gated chloride channel, part of the insect’s nervous system) and the mechanism of action at that site which were responsible for ivermectin’s effectiveness. Based on what was learned from that discovery, Jacob tested a new strategy, essentially substituting for ivermectin an antibody to the glutamate gated chloride channel. His preliminary tests confirmed the antibody insecticide’s effectiveness against the mosquito that transmits malaria. In two other disease-carrying mosquitoes (yellow fever and West Nile virus) the antibody did not pass across the gut, which prevented any insecticidal effect. The next step is to immunize cattle with the antibody. Cattle are a major source of blood meals for mosquitoes. It is hoped that malaria-bearing mosquitoes that consume cattle blood carrying the toxic antibodies during the malaria parasite’s incubation period would die, disrupting transmission of the disease. A new antibody insecticide may offer hope for a malaria-free future.

Jacob is married to classmate Alyssa Brayshaw ’08. This year Alyssa was awarded a prestigious National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship to support her doctoral work. She will begin work in the fall on her Ph.D. at Texas A&M University. She plans to focus her research in the field of wildlife disease ecology, concentrating on Chagus Disease, which threatens to cross the Texas-Mexico border. Jacob was offered and accepted a post-doctoral position at Texas A&M in the lab of a population geneticist studying mosquito populations on Bioko Island and other field sites in West Africa. Jacob majored in chemistry at K. Alyssa majored in biology and studied abroad in Nairobi, Kenya.

 

Daniell Mattern ’70

Daniell received the Margaret McLean Coulter Professorship at the University of Mississippi. Daniell, who joined the “Ole Miss” faculty in 1980, was chosen for this endowed chair “as a result of his outstanding achievements in research about organic electronic materials and his unparalleled success in teaching a difficult branch of chemistry to a myriad of UM students,” said a UM news release. An organic synthetic chemist who teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in organic chemistry, Daniell has a long record of instructional excellence, having received the university’s Elsie M. Hood Outstanding Teacher of the Year in 1992 and the College of Liberal Arts Teacher of the Year in 1998. He also is an accomplished cellist (playing with the North Mississippi Symphony Orchestra) and has written a few “Ten-Minutes Plays” that have been produced by Theatre Oxford. Daniell earned his master’s and doctoral degrees from Stanford University.

Chris Tucker ’82

Chris is a fellow in the formulation science group (FSG) within Dow Chemical Company’s research and development function. He is responsible for technical leadership for the FSG. Chris joined the central research function within Dow in 1982 after graduating from K. He has worked primarily in the area of colloid and interface science including new surfactant synthesis, ionomers, microemulsions, consumer and industrial product formulation, reaction media, nanoparticle synthesis, enhanced drug solubilization, drug delivery and high throughput research. Over the course of his career he has worked on R&D projects with nearly every business within Dow. He is author of more than 40 publications and patents. At K, Chris majored in chemistry and studied abroad in Muenster, Germany.

Kate Golembiewski ’12

Professor Emerita of English Gail Griffin is a fan of Kate, a chemistry major who, Gail writes, “took on an English major very late in her career.” Kate’s putting both majors to work as a science writer, and Gail spotted one of Kate’s stories in a recent Atlantic Magazine online. “How Ancient Coral Revealed the changing Length of a Year” describes how coral layers (a byproduct of the organism’s daily living that marks a year’s growing seasons and days in a process somewhat akin to tree rings) show that the number of days that composed an earth year was much higher eons ago–420 days rather than today’s 365-6. She accounts for the difference in the dynamics of gravity, oceans and the moon’s distance from the earth, a gap growing incrementally and infinitesimally. Turns out Shakespeare’s Juliet had it right in more ways than she might have guessed when she implored Romeo to “swear not by the moon, the inconstant moon, / That monthly changes in her circled orb.” The circled orb grows imperceptibly more distant, a centimeter or so a year. (Eventually–in several million years–the moon will be too distant to cause a solar eclipse.)  With her two majors, Kate is more likely to know the science in the literary reference. Kate’s K experience also included study abroad in Scotland.

Chris Tucker ’82

Chris is a fellow in the Formulation Science Group in Dow Chemical Company’s core research and development function. Chris joined Dow in 1982 after receiving his B.A. (chemistry) from Kalamazoo College. Over the course of his career he has worked on research and development projects with nearly every business within Dow. He is author of more than 40 publications and patents. While at K Chris studied abroad in Muenster, Germany.

Amber (Terry) Hupp ’03

Amber was recently promoted to the rank of associate professor of chemistry, with tenure, at the College of the Holy Cross (Worcester, Mass.). At K Amber earned her B.A. in chemistry and studied abroad in Bonn Germany. She earned her Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from Michigan State University. Her research mainly focuses  on analyzing biodiesel fuels and biodiesel-diesel blended fuels using gas chromatography and chemometrics. Her work has been published in a variety of places, including the Journal of Chemometrics, the Journal of the American Oil Chemists Society, and Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry. She has been a member of the Holy Cross faculty since 2009. The College of the Holy Cross is a liberal arts undergraduate college with 2,900 students.