Archives

Nick Carlin-Voigt ’04

Nick has been selected by College Soccer News as one of the top 15 Division I  assistant coaches in the country. He is entering his third season as men’s soccer assistant coach at UCLA. Nick is considered one of the top recruiters in the country. In his first year with the Bruins he helped lead the team to its second consecutive PAC-12 championship. In his second season he led the effort to bring in the No. 1 ranked recruiting class. And, this past off season, he again helped bring in the consensus No. 1 ranked recruiting class.

Judith Manning Winkley ’73

Judith won the “People’s Choice” award during the Artists League of the Sandhills’ 19th Annual Art Exhibit and Sale for her oil painting “The Fisherman”. The award is given to the artist whose painting receives the most votes during the exhibit’s four-day opening weekend. Judith and her husband Rich Winkley ’71 live in Pinehurst, North Carolina

Sarah Ovink ’00

Sarah has won a 2015 National Science Foundation Faculty Early Development (CAREER) Award to study how race/ethnicity, gender, and family income are linked to career success in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The CAREER Award provides multi-year support for especially promising junior faculty members. Sarah is an assistant professor of sociology at Virginia Tech (Blacksburg). A key component of her research will be interviews with more than 100 undergraduate students in STEM and non-STEM majors at Virginia Tech and focus groups with peer interviewers. Over the next five years, Sarah and a team of graduate and undergraduate research assistants will follow up with these students as they complete their degrees and begin their careers. The grant is expected to total $453,359 over the five years. Sarah’s scholarly interests have primarily focused on educational inequality by race and gender using qualitative and quantitative methods of inquiry. Other research interests include immigration, Latino/Latina populations, and undocumented students.

She recently published an article in the journal Gender & Society that examines trends in Latinos’/Latinas’ postsecondary pathways and life course decisions over a two-year period. She is completing work on a book titled Race, Class, and Choice in Latino/a Higher Education: Pathways in the College-for-All Era under contract with Palgrave Macmillan.

Kimberly Osborne ’93

Since her return last year from her position as chief strategic communications adviser to the Afghan National Security Forces in Kabul, Kimberly has built a successful international consultant practice with clients in Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., and Africa. Last June she was selected as a Fulbright Specialist and will work on various educational capacity building projects at foreign institutions. And this fall she became the first person to hold the endowed C-SPAN Chair at the Brian Lamb School for Communication at Purdue University. She teaches and builds programs at the nexus of public policy and mass communication.

Paul Shapiro ’70

Paul Shapiro (second from right) is honored at the ArtSchools Network national meeting.

Paul Shapiro (second from left) is honored at the ArtSchools Network national meeting.

Paul recently received recognition for his work in arts integration at the Seattle Academy of Arts and Sciences. At its national conference the ArtSchools Network cited Paul and his efforts with an “Exemplary Arts Program” designation. Paul is a former actor, Ringling Brothers circus clown and international management consultant. He received the Stone Award in Education when he graduated from K. He is also a recipient of the Winifred Ward Award from the American Theatre Association, and he can be seen with actor Elliot Gould on Netflix in “Switchmas.” At K, Paul majored in political science and studied abroad in Ghana. He earned a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Montana.

Dale Norton ’73

Dale was awarded the 2016 Michigan Pork Producer’s Distinguished Service Award. He and his brother, Ken ’71, are generation number four of the five generations that have worked and are working Kendale Farm in Bronson, Mich. The farm raises some 33,000 pigs a year and about 3,000 acres of crops and some cattle. Dale has been involved with pork industry leadership on both the state and national levels. Be sure to watch the video about Dale and the award.

Jessica English ’94

Jessica won the grand prize in the Kzoom Video $10,000 video services giveaway in Kalamazoo. Jessica owns and operates Birth Kalamazoo, which offers natural childbirth and breastfeeding classes, birth and postpartum doulas, lactation consults, and birth doula training. She received $7,500 in video services, after receiving 4,091 votes in the online voting contest.

Morowa Yejide ’92

Morowa is one of five NAACP Image Award nominees in the category of Outstanding Literary Debut Work. Her novel for which she was nominated is titled Time of the Locust. The award ceremony will occur in Pasadena, California, on February 6. In other news regarding the novel, Simon & Schuster has included Time of the Locust in this year’s Freshman Reading Catalog  for college administrators.

Cliff Van Eaton ’72

A book by Cliff has been named a finalist in the 2015 Royal Society of New Zealand Science Book Prize. Manuka: The Biography of an Extraordinary Honey, is the ‘rags-to-riches’ tale of how a piece of scientific serendipity turned an unwanted honey into a ground-breaking medicine. The Royal Society of New Zealand is modeled on the original Royal Society in England, the oldest continuing academy of sciences in the world. An important function of the Society is the sharing of science-based ideas in the overall New Zealand community, and the Book Prize is a way of celebrating the efforts of writers and publishers in that regard. The competition is held every two years, and is open to all books by New Zealand authors that “communicate scientific concepts in an interesting and readable way for a general audience.” The judges noted that “manuka honey is a uniquely New Zealand product, valued here and internationally for its rich taste and therapeutic properties.” They went on to write, “… this delightful and surprising book … tells the captivating story of the science behind the discovery of the antibiotic effects of manuka honey, with a focus on the scientists and beekeepers who have brought this product to the world.” Cliff is a well-known writer on beekeeping subjects and is co-author of two books on bee diseases. For more than 30 years he worked as a beekeeper adviser in New Zealand, and has also assisted beekeepers in countries as diverse as the Solomon Islands, Uruguay, and Vietnam. This is his first foray into popular non-fiction. Manuka: The Biography of an Extraordinary Honey is now on sale in bookstores in New Zealand, Australia, and the United Kingdom. The book is also available in the United States through Amazon.

Scott Mahoney ’80

Scott has been selected by his peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America 2016. Scott is a partner with the Las Vegas law firm Fisher & Phillips LLP that specializes in labor and employment law, labor and employment litigation, employee benefits law, and immigration law. The firm has more than 300 attorneys in 31 cities. Best Lawyers is based on an exhaustive peer-review survey in which more than 79,000 leading attorneys are eligible to vote.