Archives

Heather Booth ’00

Heather submitted a class note and photo that explained the somewhat delayed timing of her latest publication. “About five years ago, I signed a contract for my second book on librarianship for teens,” Heather wrote. “Shortly thereafter, we learned we were expecting our second child. Only one of the projects could be put on hold, so at long last, The Whole Library Handbook: Teen Services has been published by ALA Editions. This collection of essays and instructions on teen librarianship is a part of ALA’s long standing and well respected ‘Whole Library Handbook’ series. The project that could not be put on hold, Thora Violet, is now four-and-a-half years old, made of pure joy, and a great friend to her elder sister Julia, who is six. Also this spring, Paul and I bought our forever home, and are enjoying the sense of community here in Westmont, Illinois.” Thora Violet and her mom are pictured with mom’s new book.

Morowa Yejide ’92

Morowa is one of five NAACP Image Award nominees in the category of Outstanding Literary Debut Work. Her novel for which she was nominated is titled Time of the Locust. The award ceremony will occur in Pasadena, California, on February 6. In other news regarding the novel, Simon & Schuster has included Time of the Locust in this year’s Freshman Reading Catalog  for college administrators.

Samantha Weaver ’08

Samantha is an energy policy and planning analyst at Pacific Gas and Electric Company. She has been working for the last five years in the renewable energy field. In addition to her bachelor’s degree from K (political science and environmental studies), she holds a master’s degree in urban and environmental policy and planning from Tufts University.

Charles Langton ’83

Charles is legal analyst, reporter, weekend morning anchor, and a co-host at FOX 2 (WJBK) in Southfield, Michigan. He also is a practicing attorney with his own law firm. At K he earned his bachelor’s degree in theatre arts, studied abroad in Aix-en-Provence, France, and won a best supporting actor award for a Festival Playhouse role in William Inge’s play Picnic. He earned his law degree from the Detroit College of Law and later enrolled at (and graduated first in his class from) the Specs Howard School of Broadcast Arts. Since then he has worked in several radio and television positions and has won four Emmys and three Wade McCree Jr. awards for excellence in legal journalism presented by the State Bar of Michigan.

Corey Marks ’92

Corey is a professor and director of creative writing for the department of English at the University of North Texas. He is a prizewinning author of two volumes of poetry, Renunciation and, more recently, The Radio Tree. Corey is also a poetry editor at the American Literary Review and a judge for the University of North Texas Rilke Prize, which recognizes mid-career poets. An article on Corey that mentions his roots in rural Michigan and at Kalamazoo College appeared in the NTDaily.com.

Marti Goetz ’76

Marti has been named the first executive director of Friends of Bear’s Mill, a nonprofit organization formed in 2000 to ensure the 165-year-old mill (in Greenville, Ohio) is protected and remains open to the public. Marti brings more than 35 years of administration, executive planning, organizational leadership, project management, grant writing, communications, art production, and public awareness experience in the nonprofit sector. At K she earned her bachelor’s degree in art and studied abroad in Caen, France. She obtained a master’s degree in art therapy from Wright State University, and recently completed a doctorate in leadership and organizational change from Antioch University.

Cliff Van Eaton ’72

A book by Cliff has been named a finalist in the 2015 Royal Society of New Zealand Science Book Prize. Manuka: The Biography of an Extraordinary Honey, is the ‘rags-to-riches’ tale of how a piece of scientific serendipity turned an unwanted honey into a ground-breaking medicine. The Royal Society of New Zealand is modeled on the original Royal Society in England, the oldest continuing academy of sciences in the world. An important function of the Society is the sharing of science-based ideas in the overall New Zealand community, and the Book Prize is a way of celebrating the efforts of writers and publishers in that regard. The competition is held every two years, and is open to all books by New Zealand authors that “communicate scientific concepts in an interesting and readable way for a general audience.” The judges noted that “manuka honey is a uniquely New Zealand product, valued here and internationally for its rich taste and therapeutic properties.” They went on to write, “… this delightful and surprising book … tells the captivating story of the science behind the discovery of the antibiotic effects of manuka honey, with a focus on the scientists and beekeepers who have brought this product to the world.” Cliff is a well-known writer on beekeeping subjects and is co-author of two books on bee diseases. For more than 30 years he worked as a beekeeper adviser in New Zealand, and has also assisted beekeepers in countries as diverse as the Solomon Islands, Uruguay, and Vietnam. This is his first foray into popular non-fiction. Manuka: The Biography of an Extraordinary Honey is now on sale in bookstores in New Zealand, Australia, and the United Kingdom. The book is also available in the United States through Amazon.

Drew Brockington ’04

The publisher Little, Brown has acquired rights Drew’s Cat-Stronauts: Mission Moon, a graphic novel aimed at chapter book readers. The story follows the space adventures of a team of cat astronauts as they race to the moon to solve a global energy crisis. Cat-Stronauts is Drew’s debut as an illustrator, and it’s the first of a four-book deal. It will publish in spring of 2017. Drew earned his B.A. at K in art and art history, and he studied abroad in Rome, Italy.

Douglas Ray ’79, Ph.D.

Douglas has been named to lead a new office at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In this new position, which Douglas began on June 1, he will identify and create strategic partnering opportunities between PNNL, research universities, and other scientific research institutions. For the last 10 years Douglas has overseen PNNL’s fundamental science research portfolio. PNNL is a national laboratory in the U.S. Department of Energy. Douglas majored in physics at K.

 

Gary Babcock ’60

Gary died on June 27, 2015. He came to Kalamazoo College already fascinated by technology and physics. In fact, he helped pay his way through K by building vacuum-tube volt meters during summer vacations. He earned his bachelor’s degree in physics and took a job with the Naval Air Weapons Research Station in China Lake, California. His primary career focus was on computers. After Gary retired from China Lake in 1984, he lived briefly in Fairfield, Iowa, where he studied transcendental meditation. Returning to California after a couple of years, he worked for several contractors as a computer troubleshooter and photographer. Gary loved chamber music, reading, taking wildflower photographs and learning new things. His favorite occupation in recent years was playing with his beloved grandchildren, Svetlana and Dalton.