Archives

Brett Blaauw ’05

Brett co-authored a paper that appeared in the Journal of Applied Ecology. According to paper’s other co-author, Rufus Isaacs, theirs is the first paper that demonstrates an economic advantage for farmers when they create wild bee habitat next to cultivated fields. The two entomologists planted marginal land surrounding blueberry fields with a mix of native perennial wildflowers. Even though the fields were pollinated by honey bees trucked in for the purpose, Brett discovered that, after a period of two years, the rising population of wild bees increased blueberry yields by 10 to 20 percent. That increase more than offset the costs of making the marginal land attractive to wild bee populations. Brett was the lead author on the paper. The K biology major completed his Ph.D. at Michigan State University under Isaacs and is now working at Rutgers University.

Paul Joseph Carpenter ’49

Paul died on March 6, 2014. He served with the U.S. Navy in the Pacific theater during World War II, and his war experiences precipitated his lifelong advocacy for peace and justice. After the war he graduated earned his B.A. in sociology from K and then earned his Master of Divinity degree from Union Theological Seminary in New York City. His thesis advisor there was the noted theologian Reinhold Niebuhr. Paul was ordained in the Community Baptist Church of Montgomery Center, Vermont in 1954. He also served American Baptist churches in Cleveland and Norwalk, Ohio. He was granted standing in the Congregational Church (known today as the United Church of Christ) in 1962, and he served UCC churches in Parkman, Brecksville, and Youngstown, Ohio, where he was instrumental in establishing a chapter of Habitat For Humanity. At the age of 55 Carpenter returned to school, achieving a master’s degree in community counseling. He concluded his career ministering successfully to persons suffering with mental illness in the Youngstown community.

Mary Sauer-Games ’83

Mary has been named vice president for product management at Online Computer Library Center (OCLC). She is responsible for OCLC products and services around the world. She comes to OCLC from the American Psychological Association, where she managed PsycINFO database products and led an organization of 70 staff. Mary is a board member of the National Federation of Advanced Information Services, a global organization that serves the information community. She also sits on the board of CrossRef, an association of publishers that develops shared infrastructure to support more effective scholarly communications. She earned her B.A. in economics and studied abroad in Clermont-Ferrand, France. She earned a M.B.A. from the University of Michigan.

Dan Babbitt ’96

Biologist, educator, and “bug geek,” Dan manages the O. Orkin Insect Zoo and Butterfly Pavilion (part of the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History). He contributed his expertise to a recent NPR report (the delightfully titled “How Animals Hacked the Rainbow and Got Stumped on Blue”) about the evolution of the uses of color by animals. Turns out that living and reproducing depended occasionally on an organism’s ability to make itself a certain color. And it further turns out that the color blue was difficult for animals to make by ingesting dietary pigments (many animals get their color from their food). According to Dan, if you can’t make blue, then make the optical technology to appear blue. The entomologist then provides a beautiful example–the blue morpho butterfly, some of which he keeps at his insect zoo. They have tiny transparent structures on their wing surface that reflect light in a way that makes the wings appear so blue it hurts your eyes. But ground up wings, robbed of the reflective prism structures, look gray or brown. At K Dan majored in biology, and his study abroad in Ecuador gave him ample opportunity to pursue his love of insects, a passion he traces back to his freshman year aquatic ecology class. Dan has never forgotten the influence of K on the trajectory of his career. Not long ago he sponsored a K externship at the insect zoo.

Steven D. Adams ’76

Steven died on December 1, 2014. At K he earned his bachelor’s degree in economics and business, and he studied abroad in Hannover, Germany. He also was a fine Hornet football player and wrestler who won the Opie Davis Award in 1976 for Most Outstanding Athlete. After graduation he earned his law degree from Wayne State University Law School, where he served on the school’s Law Review. He was an accomplished attorney and a member of the State Bar of Michigan Business Law, Probate & Estate Planning, and Master Lawyer sections. Steven founded Stellar Building and Development in Hazel Park (Mich.) and ran it with his three brothers for more than 25 years. Steven gave of his time, money, and spirit, providing many hours of pro bono legal services, youth coaching, and mentoring. He was the first in his family to attend Kalamazoo College, starting a proud tradition that his extended family carried on with Derek Adams ’97, Rebecca Adams ’03, Matthew Kaiser ’04, Meghan Adams ’07, Jessica (Adams) Baranowski ’09, and Adam Baranowski ’09.

Dale Norton ’73

Dale was elected president of the National Pork Board in June of 2014. NPB is the trade association for U.S. pork producers. Dale has served on the 15-member board for five years. He and his brother Ken (class of 1971) raise hogs, among other agricultural operations, at Kendale Farm in Bronson, Michigan. Dale’s work with NPB was featured in a December article published in the Bronson Journal. In it he extols the value of a liberal arts education in farming and farm policy issues. The article also mentions the hog roast he and his brother have hosted for their K classmates and friends for nearly four decades.