Archives

Ben Hale ’94

BenHaleBen has published a book titled The Wild and the Wicked (MIT University Press). He combines anecdote and philosophy to argue that an impulse toward environmental activism is a matter of humanity and moral action, quite apart from the question of whether nature is good or bad and our response to it, whether love or indifference. Ben is an associate professor in the philosophy department and environmental studies program at the University of Colorado, Boulder. His primary area of research focus is environmental ethics. He’s worked at the University of Colorado-Boulder since 2005. At K he majored in philosophy and did his study abroad in Russia.

Morowa Yejidé ’92

Autism, incarceration, single parenthood, racism, eating disorders are some of the heavyweight topics Morowa takes on in her award-winning debut novel, Time of the Locust. Former Kalamazoo College employee (and occasional LuxEsto freelance writer) Zinta Aistars interviewed Morowa for “Between the Lines,” a book review radio show of WMUK, Kalamazoo’s local affiliate of NPR. You can listen to the interview here.

AsiaLiza Morales ’15

AsiaLiza is a co-author of the scientific paper, “Effects of Road Dust on the Pollination and Reproduction of Wildflowers,” which appeared in the February 1, 2017, issue of International Journal of Plant Sciences. She and her research team studied whether roadside traffic dust affects the amounts of pollen received and seeds produced in wildflowers. Preliminary results suggest that dust exposure does reduce pollen received by plants closest to unpaved roads but that seeds per flower vary inconsistently as a function of road proximity. More study is necessary. AsiaLiza’s Senior Individualized Project work at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory was part of the data that went into this paper. At K AsiaLiza majored in biology and studed abroad in Caceres, Spain. She currently works with Deb (Tokarski) Yourick ’80 in a mentoring program in Washington, D.C.

Cliff Van Eaton ’72

Author Cliff Van Eaton holds his bookA book by Cliff has been named a finalist in the 2015 Royal Society of New Zealand Science Book Prize. Manuka: The Biography of an Extraordinary Honey, is the ‘rags-to-riches’ tale of how a piece of scientific serendipity turned an unwanted honey into a ground-breaking medicine. The Royal Society of New Zealand is modeled on the original Royal Society in England, the oldest continuing academy of sciences in the world. An important function of the Society is the sharing of science-based ideas in the overall New Zealand community, and the Book Prize is a way of celebrating the efforts of writers and publishers in that regard. The competition is held every two years, and is open to all books by New Zealand authors that “communicate scientific concepts in an interesting and readable way for a general audience.” The judges noted that “manuka honey is a uniquely New Zealand product, valued here and internationally for its rich taste and therapeutic properties.” They went on to write, “… this delightful and surprising book … tells the captivating story of the science behind the discovery of the antibiotic effects of manuka honey, with a focus on the scientists and beekeepers who have brought this product to the world.” Cliff is a well-known writer on beekeeping subjects and is co-author of two books on bee diseases. For more than 30 years he worked as a beekeeper adviser in New Zealand, and has also assisted beekeepers in countries as diverse as the Solomon Islands, Uruguay, and Vietnam. This is his first foray into popular non-fiction. Manuka: The Biography of an Extraordinary Honey is now on sale in bookstores in New Zealand, Australia, and the United Kingdom. The book is also available in the United States through Amazon.

Edward Moticka ’66

dwardMotickaEd is the author of the recently released book A Historical Perspective on Evidence-Based Immunology. The book highlights the evidence supporting immunology concepts commonly taken for granted, including results of hypothesis-driven controlled scientific experiments. Ed is professor and chair of basic medical sciences at the A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine (Mesa, Ariz.). His book was released on December 18, “the same day that ’Star Wars: The Force Awakens’ opened in theaters,” he wrote. “It is only coincidence that the figure on the cover looks like the Death Star.”

Henry S. Perkins ’71, M.D.

Henry published the book, A Guide to Psychosocial and Spiritual Care at the End of Life, for patients, families, health professionals, clergy, and social workers.  The book addresses topics ranging from end-of-life prognostic quandaries to care for family caregivers to beliefs about death and the afterlife.  When writing the book Henry drew on his experiences practicing medicine among the poor of Kenya, Mexico, and Texas.  In 2012 he retired after teaching internal medicine and medical ethics for 27 years at The University of Texas.  He continues as a consultant in bioethics at the Ecumenical Center for Religion and Health in San Antonio. At K Henry majored in physics and studied abroad in Bonn, Germany. He earned his medical degree from the University of Michigan.

Brett Blaauw ’05

Brett co-authored a paper that appeared in the Journal of Applied Ecology. According to paper’s other co-author, Rufus Isaacs, theirs is the first paper that demonstrates an economic advantage for farmers when they create wild bee habitat next to cultivated fields. The two entomologists planted marginal land surrounding blueberry fields with a mix of native perennial wildflowers. Even though the fields were pollinated by honey bees trucked in for the purpose, Brett discovered that, after a period of two years, the rising population of wild bees increased blueberry yields by 10 to 20 percent. That increase more than offset the costs of making the marginal land attractive to wild bee populations. Brett was the lead author on the paper. The K biology major completed his Ph.D. at Michigan State University under Isaacs and is now working at Rutgers University.

Drew Brockington ’04

The publisher Little, Brown has acquired rights Drew’s Cat-Stronauts: Mission Moon, a graphic novel aimed at chapter book readers. The story follows the space adventures of a team of cat astronauts as they race to the moon to solve a global energy crisis. Cat-Stronauts is Drew’s debut as an illustrator, and it’s the first of a four-book deal. It will publish in spring of 2017. Drew earned his B.A. at K in art and art history, and he studied abroad in Rome, Italy.

Corey Marks ’92

Corey was the spring 2016 Lawrence Clayton Poets and Writers Speaker Series guest at Hardin-Simmons University (Abilene, Texas). Corey is the author of two award-winning volumes of poetry. His first book, Renunciation, was selected by the late Philip Levine as a 1999 National Poetry Series Competition Winner. It also received the Natalie Ornish Prize from the Texas Institute of Letters. His most recent book The Radio Tree, won the Gren Rose Prize from New Issues Press in 2011. Corey is the Distinguished Teaching Professor and Director of Creative Writing at the University of North Texas (Denton).

At Hardin-Simmons Corey participated in an afternoon question and answer session and, in the evening, he read poems from his collection of works. His poems have appeared in the New England Review, The Paris Review, Poetry Northwest, Ploughshares, Southwest Review, The Threepenny Review, TriQuarterly, The Virginia Quarterly Review, as well as in the anthology Legitimate Dangers (Sarabande Books, 2006) among others. Corey earned his B.A. in English at K. His Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing (poetry) is from Warren Wilson College, and his Ph.D. in Creative Writing and Literature is from the University of Houston.