Archives

Caroline (Orosz) Robbins ’07

Caroline (Carly) recently published her first novel, Devil Music. She has also published a series of free Web comics to accompany the novel. Both works are entirely self-published. Carly earned an M.F.A. (poetry) from Sarah Lawrence College. Her poetry has been published in Wavelength Journal and SpoutMagazine. An article on Carly and her work will appear in the Fall issue of LuxEsto.

Helene (Baker) Dunbar ’87

John, Keira, and Helene Dunbar

Helene experienced a crazy year in 2013. First she sold two young adult contemporary books, the first of which, These Gentle Wounds, was published by Flux on May 8 of this year. Then, in December 2013, she and her husband, John, brought their daughter Keira home from Bulgaria. Helene still lives in Nashville, works in marketing, and assumes that 2014 will probably be just at frantic.

Michael Winkelman ’91

Michael has published a new book: A Cognitive Approach to John Donne’s Songs and Sonnets, part of publisher Palgrave Macmillan’s series titled “Cognitive Studies in Literature and Performance.” Investigations into brain function have led to recent remarkable discoveries with profound implications for interpreting literature. Donne, who wrote in the 17th century, was a contemporary of Shakespeare and one of the first Metaphysical poets. He later became a famous cleric many of whose meditations are cited today. For example, “Meditation XVII” from Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions includes the famous prose passage that begins “No man is an island” and concludes with “And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.” Donne’s probing insights, expressed in his unique Metaphysical style, make his amorous verse a ripe subject for cognitive analysis. Winkelman’s study applies recent breakthroughs from neuroscience and evolutionary psychology in order to deepen the understanding of Donne’s songs and sonnets. By applying findings from neurolinguistics to Donne’s work, Winkelman presents a test case for the cognitive interpretation of verse and, more broadly, advances the case of New Humanism.

Paul Blowers ’95

Paul has been named chief information officer of Plante Moran, a public accounting and business advisory firm. In his new role, he will be responsible for the information technology that supports Plante Moran’s enterprise goals. Blowers has IT leadership experience in strategy, architecture, solution delivery and operations. Prior to joining Plante Moran, he worked for Kelly Services as chief architect and senior director of enterprise architecture and business solutions. At K, Blowers majored in psychology and was a stand-out member of the Hornet swim team, earning Division III All-American honors. Blowers is the co-author of the textbook, e-Commerce in Virtual Worlds.

Aaron Saari ’98

Aaron is the new part-time pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Yellow Springs, Ohio. A bible scholar and theologian, Aaron is the author of The Many Deaths of Judas Iscariot, a book about the historical figure and the issue of suicide. He has been a visiting professor at Xavier and an adjunct instructor at Antioch University Midwest, teaching courses in writing, Christianity, and non-western religions.

Bethany Gross ’10

Bethany is a coauthor of the article “Evaluation of 3D Printing and its Potential Impact on Biotechnology and the Chemical Sciences,” published in Analytical Chemistry in January. Nearing 30 years since its introduction, 3D printing technology is set to revolutionize research and teaching laboratories. The article encompasses the history of 3D printing, reviews various printing methods, and presents current applications. The authors offer an appraisal of the future direction and impact the technology will have on laboratory settings as 3D printers become more accessible. Gross’s research at Michigan State University encompasses the development of a flow-based 3D printed microfluidic device with integrated electrodes to initiate and evaluate injury-induced blood-clot formation.

June (Wilmsen) Severance ’45

June has published, at age 90, From the Inside: A Look at Nursing Homes and Their Patients in Today’s Elder Care System. The book provides her insider look at the day-to-day happenings of  nursing homes both as a resident and a friend to residents.  Central to those observations is her unique mix of humor, introspection, and occasional depression as she faced the work of getting well and coping with pain.

During the last decade June spent nine months in three different nursing homes in Montana and the Midwest. “People need to know what it’s like to be in a nursing home,” she said.

Though it occurred decades ago, her father’s nursing home stay in New York  remains seared into her memory, and was the impetus for the book.   “I was so furious,” she remembers.  “It was so negative.  To be in a nursing home is to truly be someone different.”  But, over the years, she says, she learned that “Nursing homes are NOT the worst thing in the world.  I came to scorn and stayed to praise,” she concludes.

June enrolled in Kalamazoo College at the age of 16.  She majored in English and theatre. The latter may not be surprising, given the fact that she had been a child performer at the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair. During her student days at K, a weekly campus segment she did on the local radio station eventually became a full-time job with CBS-WKZO in Kalamazoo. She worked on a feature called “News of Women Today,” which carried stories on women’s responses to World War II throughout the world and the effect the war had on women’s status and work.

June and her husband, Wayne, have lived near Whitehall, Montana for 20 years.  They spent most of their marriage in East Aurora, N.Y., where Wayne worked for Fisher-Price.  June earned her M.A.  at Syracuse University and taught there. She also directed plays at both the Buffalo and the East Aurora theaters. And she performed her own material in a series of one-woman shows. She and Wayne eventually moved west to be closer to their two sons and five grandchildren. She helped establish a theatre group in Whitehall. For four years, “Jefferson Valley Presents” staged an outdoor dinner theatre production on the Lewis and Clark expedition. June wrote the script, performed, and helped with the costuming.

In Print

Time of the Locust
by Morowa Yejidé ’92

Time of the Locust is the debut fiction novel for Dara Morowa Yejide Madzimoyo. She is an accomplished writer whose short stories have appeared in the Istanbul Review, Ascent Aspirations Magazine, Underground Voices, the Adirondack Review, and others. Her story “Tokyo Chocolate” was nominated in 2009 for the Pushcart Prize, anthologized in the Best of the Willesden Herald Stories, and reviewed in the Japan Times. She is also the recipient of the Norris Church Mailer Scholarship from Wilkes University.

Locust is a deeply imaginative journey into the heart and mind of an extraordinary autistic boy, and it explores the themes of a mother’s devotion, a father’s punishment, and the power of love. The novel was a finalist for the 2012 PEN/Bellwether Prize for socially engaged fiction.

Yejidé is a research faculty member at Georgia Institute of Technology and an adjunct faculty member at the University of Maryland. She read an excerpt from her novel at the National Black Writer’s Conference in March, and she will give a reading and book signing on June 22 at 5 PM at Politics and Prose bookstore in Washington, D.C. (5015 Connecticut Ave NW, 202.364.1919).

 

100 Haiku
by Ray Comeau ’63

Comeau wrote this series of poems over the course of several months based on A Course in Miracles, a self-study curriculum which aims to assist its readers in achieving spiritual transformation. He blends the Haiku with photographs from the collection Theo O’Connor and Leda Robertson. Each photograph enhances the meaning of a Haiku, and each Haiku brings out the essence of the photograph. This book offers a gentle, simple introduction to A Course in Miracles.

“It would not take much to spark an inspiring burst of thought,” writes Comeau, “usually a phrase, or a sentence, from a lesson in the Course, or a passage in the Text, and occasionally from a newspaper article, or a book, or a magazine or a conversation, or just looking out the window at the scenery, the birds, the rain and snow, the sunshine.” He describes the writing experience with a phrase—”wild exactitude”—attributed to Harold Ross describing writers with whom he’d worked at the New Yorker magazine. Writes Comeau: “I experienced the wildness in the excitement of receiving these creative sparks, and the exactness in the rendering of the inspiration into 17 syllables, 5-7-5.”