September 2012

CLASS NOTES

1940's | 1950's | 1960's | 1970's | 1980's | 1990's | 2000's | Friends | In Memory

1960's

Joseph Stulberg ’67 was named the Michael E. Moritz Chair in Alternative Dispute Resolution at the Ohio State University Moritz College of Law. He has been a faculty member at the college since 1998. Stulberg was one of 20 international scholars awarded a 2012 Ikerbasque Faculty Research Fellowship. The fellowship encourages international scholars to engage in research projects in the Basque region and is funded jointly by the Basque Foundation for Science and the European Union. Stulberg will conduct research while based at the University of Deusto Law School. His project is titled "Mediation Theory and Institutional Design: The Role of Cultural Values in Shaping Policy and Practice."
Jack Robert Staff ’68 is a retired professor and Internet CEO who now writes spiritual adventure novels. Staff recently won a Jurors Fiction Prize from Idaho Magazine and has just completed his second novel, Embracing the Mystery. His first, Learning to Wave, won five-star reviews in 2002. Staff's seven-page feature on homesteading was published in the May 2012 issue of Idaho Magazine. He is the father of 10 children and grandfather of three, and he remains an avid outdoorsman.

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1970's

Richard Winkley ’71 played golf host to two of his former Hornet hoops teammates: Dan Laskoski '71 and Ron Lipinski '72. The threesome got together for golf at the Pinehurst, N.C., home of Rich and his wife, Judith (Manning) Winkley '73. Janice Laskoski and Karen Lipinski also joined them for the week. Pictured are (l-r): Dan, Ron, and Rich.
Wendy (Newcomer) Edson ’74 is the coordinator of the Rappahannock Community College associate degree nursing program. In May she was awarded the honor of bearing the college mace at RCC's 40th commencement because of her outstanding service and leadership. Edson teaches, advises, hires clinical faculty, and arranges opportunities for classes to work in clinical settings. After graduating from K with a major in anthropology, she earned a B.A. in nursing (Montana State University), a M.P.H. (Johns Hopkins University), and a Ph.D. in nursing (University of Maryland). Edson has been a nurse for more than 30 years and is particularly interested in the quality of health care, maternity nursing, and public health nursing. She speaks fluent French (she minored in the subject at K and studied abroad in Clermont-Ferrand) and has spent several periods living in Africa. She retired from RCC at the end of this recent academic year.
Cynthia (Schaefer) Gillard ’76 recently wrote When Vaudeville Came to Joplin, a novel covering life during the Industrial Revolution. Cynthia got the idea for the novel from a 100-year-old scrapbook created by her grandfather, who was an actor.
Carlton Marcyan ’76 received in June his M.B.A. with honors from the Lake Forest Graduate School of Management. He also was named "Lawyer of the Year" by Best Lawyers/U.S. News for his practice in family law in the Chicago area. On July 1 he became president of the Collaborative Law Institute of Illinois. His son, Colt, recently graduated from The Citadel (Charleston, S.C.) and received his commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps after successfully completing Officer Candidate School (Quantico, Va.).
Abea Chou ’77 sent a photo of an August (2012) reunion of Blair House devotees that took place in Traverse City, Michigan. Pictured are (l-r): Abea, Nancy Paul, Carma Park, Shaheen Rushd, and Connie Booth.
Mary Ellen Geist ’78 will deliver the keynote address at the Alzheimer's Association's Dr. Richard Seyfarth Schreiber Memorial Conference in the fall (October 16). Mary Ellen is the author of Measure of the Heart: A Father's Alzheimer's, A Daughter's Return. Her talk is titled "Caregiving From the Heart."
Patricia Ann Webb ’78 is one of some 30 experts who are part of the Earhart Recovery Project, a $2.2 million mission to Nikumaroro Island, which is believed to be the final resting place of Amelia Earhart, one of the first women to fly a plane. Earhart was piloting a plane in the South Pacific that went down 75 years ago and has never been recovered. She was attempting to become the first woman to circumnavigate the globe by airplane. The Discovery Channel is traveling with the team and will air a documentary on it. The project is privately funded and has been featured in the news. Webb is a retired U.S. Air Force colonel.

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1980's

Dianne Willer-Sly ’80 is a primary care provider affiliated with a multi-site health care system in the Twin Cities area of Minnesota and an affiliate faculty member at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing. Previously, she was a teaching specialist at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing, a nurse practitioner (NP) at the Austin State School in Austin, Texas, and a clinical preceptor in NP programs at several schools. During her 30-year career as an NP and registered nurse, Willer-Sly has lectured widely on a variety of subjects including the health status of geriatric patients. She is a University of Minnesota Hartford Geriatric Nursing Education Scholar and was recognized as one of "five fabulous nurses of the year" by the Texas Nursing Association District Five for demonstrating exceptional professional nursing practice. Willer-Sly's daughter, Katie, is a member of the recently graduated Class of 2012.
Richard Counsman ’81 recently joined the law firm Plunkett Cooney (Bloomfield Hills, Mich.) as a senior attorney. Counsman focuses his practice in the area of medical liability with an emphasis on birth trauma. He is highly regarded in this field and much sought after as a lecturer and trainer. He earned his J.D. from Thomas Cooley Law School in 1985.
Ellen Molle ’83 was named vice president and public relations manager at Rockland Trust. She will oversee the strategic planning, management, execution, and analysis of public relations activity for the full-service commercial bank headquartered in Rockland, Massachusetts. Molle is pursuing a master's degree in government studies from Harvard University.
Carol (Stringham) Huber ’86 has been living and working in France for about 20 years. She is the resident director of the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill's study abroad program in Montpellier, France. "My Kalamazoo College study abroad experience in Caen is certainly what has led me to my chosen career," she wrote. "I am grateful for the opportunity to work with American students in France."
Keith Crandall ’87 has been hired by George Washington University to direct its new Computational Biology Institute. Computational biology combines elements of computer science and biology, and its practitioners develop tools to analyze data generated in researching genetics and genomics, including genetic mapping and DNA sequencing. Crandall's research interests have included crustacean biology, biodiversity, and infectious diseases. His B.A. from Kalamazoo College is in biology. At Washington University in St. Louis he earned a Ph.D.in population and evolutionary biology and a master's degree in statistics. Among the work he will do at George Washington University will be an investigation of the impact of the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, using gene expression to identify how oil pollutants affect deep sea crustaceans.
Matthew Frank ’88 has joined the Milwaukee based Johnson Controls as their Global Compliance Counsel. Matt had been General Counsel at Hill's Pet Nutrition in Topeka, Kansas.

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1990's

Alisa Crawford ’91 is pleased to announce the birth of her son Alistair Edward Crawford, born April 7, 2012. Alix joins his big brother Charlie, and he is already sporting (and is quite proud of) his K shirt!
Michael Limbert ’92 won a Cannes Gold Lion (Mobile category) for his "Chevy Game Time" Super Bowl app. In his "day job" he works for the advertising firm Goodby, Silverstein & Partners.
Heather Stevens ’92 married Karl L. Schoning on September 20, 2011. The couple live in the Washington, D.C., area.
Joy Campbell ’96 and Kyle Enger, along with big sister Michaela, welcomed Carrick Birch Campbell Enger on January 16, 2012. The whole family is doing well, and four-year-old Michaela greatly enjoys her baby brother. In addition to being a busy mom, Joy marks 10 years at Michigan State University this year. She is executive associate director of the Center for Language Education and Research and adds an associate directorship of the Center for Language Teaching Advancement this fall.
Matt Priest ’97 wrote, "2012 has been a banner year for the Priests, as February 25 saw the birth of our daughter, Sawyer Malone! She arrived five weeks early, so she was stuck in the NICU for a month. But these days, she's doing wonderfully and growing like a weed, thanks to her epic, inherited appetite. Almost daily, she surprises and amazes us with some new face, sound or motor skill! It's unreal. Otherwise, my band Canasta is still hard at work spreading orchestral pop throughout Chicago and the world over. The line-up is down from six K alums to two, but the group recently turned ten years old, which is an eternity in "indie rock years." And in early February, we had the honor of touring the hinterlands of Mongolia as guests of the U.S. State Department. That month happens to be the country's coldest (-23F, on average), and per square mile it's the world's least populous country. So I'm happy to report that the trip was every bit as insane as you'd expect."
Jen (Getting) Jameslyn ’99 wrote, "I went to a Literary Kitchen writing workshop this winter, met the amazing and talented Lauren, and we have been blogging together since. Weirdly enough, we both grew up in the Midwest, toured with jam bands, hung out with sketchy hippie boys, started (but didn't finish) grad school, and are now raising preschool and toddler aged daughters and trying to figure out how to be mothers, writers, and people simultaneously."

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2000's

Felicity Hesed ’00 served as emcee at the Alameda (California) Architectural Society's annual awards event last May. The circus artist and comedienne completed the Clown Conservatory Program in San Francisco, California, and trained in acrobatic and aerial arts at the Actors Gymnasium in Chicago, Illinois, and the Circus Center in San Francisco. This summer, she will appear in the Bay Area Children Theatre's Circus Adventure.
Caitlin Gilmet ’02 lives in Portland, Maine, where she serves as associate dean of admission at Waynflete School. She completed a Tough Mudder obstacle course challenge last summer in Vermont with three other K alumni. Pictured are (l-r): David Lively '03, Caitlin, Caitlin's sister (and David's wife) Kelsey Gilmet '04, and Scott Montmorency '03.
Amanda Stitt ’02 married Ryan Irvin in Flint, Michigan, on May 19, 2012. Attending the wedding were a number of fellow Kalamazoo College graduates (l-r): Cathy Lancaster '00, Amanda, Amy (Lancaster) McFarland '94, Michelle Busuito '04, and Ryan.
Carla Kaiser ’04 married Scott Solis on May 19, 2012, in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Joining the celebration were fellow classmates from across the country (l-r): back row--Jocelyn Moore, Kate Hamel, Carla (Kaiser) Solis, Nora Hauk, Loren Moulds, Drew Brockington; front row--Ryan Hatch, Max Cherem, and Matt Pieknik. Carla and Scott (not pictured) met in Minneapolis and currently live in New Jersey. Adding to the joy of this past year, Nora Hauk and Max Cherem celebrated their marriage in the fall of 2011.
Patrick Lannen ’06 recently graduated from the prestigious Leadership Oakland 2011-2012 Cornerstone Program. Members of the 2011-2012 class, who represent businesses and nonprofit agencies, were recognized at a ceremony in Auburn Hills, Michigan. Lannen graduated magna cum laude in 2009 from University of Detroit Mercy School of Law. He works as an attorney with Plunkett Cooney in Bloomfield Hills.
Katie Ovink ’07 received her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from Washington State University in June 2012. Attending the ceremony were her parents, Roger and Jennifer Dill Ovink (both members of the Class of 1973) and her sister, Sarah M. Ovink '00 (pictured with Katie in the inset). Also attending (but not pictured) were Katie's grandmothers, ages 91 and 83, and Katie's four-year-old niece.
Rohan Krishnamurthy ’08 completed his final semester-in-residence at the Eastman School of Music. During the early summer he kept a full schedule presenting at international music festivals and workshops, teaching a course at Eastman, and giving concerts across the country. In August he left for India for six months to do dissertation research, performances, and other musical projects. He plans to finish his dissertation for his Ph.D in musicology in spring 2013. In other news, his drum patent, on which he began working as a K student, was accepted. "As a senior at K I presented my music/physics SIP research (exploring the acoustics of my new drum design) at the Acoustical Society of America's annual conference and won the Best Student Paper Award," Rohan wrote. "I was honored to recently receive an invitation as a guest panelist at the ASA annual conference in Kansas City in October. I will be part of an interdisciplinary panel on rhythm. My four years at K have been invaluable, and I talk about my wonderful experiences with everyone!"
Ted Magdzinski ’08 and Lara Gallant Magdzinski were married on July 14, 2012. The two are colleagues in the Kalamazoo College admission department, and their admission teammates are pictured with them on their wedding day. Ted is in the back row (the tallest person), and Lara is on Ted's immediate left.

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2010's

Rebecca Lynn Aulph ’10 is an intern at the online magazine Deep South, headquartered in Lafayette, Louisiana.
Dustin Morris ’10 is in his sixth year as vocal music director at Vicksburg (Michigan) High School. He has directed choirs at Kalamazoo Christian High School and Westminster Presbyterian Church (Portage, Michigan) as well as other community choirs and church choirs in Utah and Illinois. He has a master's degree in choral directing from the University of Utah. Morris has sung professionally with the Utah Opera Company Chorus, the Baroque Artists of Champaign-Urbana, and the Camerata Singers of Muskegon.

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In Memory

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1930's

Fern (Ball) Persons ’31 died on July 22, 2012. At K, she earned her degree in French, served as president of the Eurodelphian Society her senior year and was a member of the Drama Club all four years. She was described as "a leader in everything she tries and she tries everything." After graduating she worked as an actress all of her life. She was the fifth member of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Chicago Branch when she joined on August 31, 1953. She was elected to the Chicago Branch Council in 1962 and served for 44 years until 2006, when she stepped down only because she could no longer drive. She also served more than 30 years on the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists Chicago Local Board. Persons was elected to the SAG National Board in 1976, and served on that body until 1998. During that time, from 1977-81, she was elected SAG 5th national vice president. She served as a SAG regional branch division representative on TV/Theatrical and Commercials negotiating committees throughout the 1980s and intermittently through the 1990s. Persons spearheaded many projects designed to increase employment opportunities for senior members. She was the force behind the creation of the AFTRA/SAG Senior Radio Players in 1996, which continues to this day in Chicago as the SAG-AFTRA Senior Radio Players. Because of Persons' decades of union leadership and contributions to the lives of Chicago actors and broadcasters, Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley declared July 27, 1999 Fern Persons Day. Persons was honored in 2006 with the AFTRA Founders Award and, in 2009, she was awarded SAG's prestigious Howard Keel Award.
Grace (Bosker Craik) Wagner ’35 died May 5, 2012, in Naples, Florida. She was 97. Grace went on from K to study at Western Michigan University and the University of Michigan. She taught Latin and English in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and was famous for taking her high school Latin students to Rome for spring break. She volunteered at Naples Community Hospital and loved golf, shopping, reading, swimming entertaining, hiking, traveling, her friends, and relaxing at her cottage in Northern Michigan.
Louise (Barrows) Northam ’36 died June 22, 2012, at age 97 in Kalamazoo. After graduating from K with a B.A. in sociology, Northam earned a master's degree in social work from Michigan State University. She was a social worker in Kalamazoo and in Northern Michigan before joining the Kalamazoo YMCA as its business and industrial gifts secretary. Northam also served on the Kalamazoo School Board and was active in many social action and interracial groups. She received the Distinguished Service Award from Kalamazoo College in 1994 and an Emeritus Club Citation of Merit Award in 2005.
William Weber ’39 died on June 8, 2012. He earned his B.A. in physics and was a great patron of Kalamazoo College his entire life. He spent much of the latter half of the 1940s and early '50s traveling around Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. He worked for Atlas Foundry (Tacoma, Wash.) from 1954-1966 and then traveled to work in Cameroon, West Africa, for the College Evangelique de Libamba in operations and plant maintenance. He returned to Tacoma in 1969 to Atlas Foundry and retired in 1972 after purchasing rental property. Weber funded the William Weber Lectures in Government and Society, which, according to Professor of Political Science Amy Elman, became the single most important event for the political science department and others each year. Weber returned to campus annually to attend the lectures. "Bill was an avid reader and political news junkie," wrote Elman. "He'd send us numerous suggestions for campus speakers--most recently he wanted Sandra Day O'Connor. Bill had a passion for reasoned debates of the kind that are now too rare, the type of respectful exchanges that foster reforms to facilitate good citizenship and alleviate injustice." In 1989 Weber began to work on endowing a faculty chair at the College. His estate will go toward furthering the goal of a fully endowed chair.

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1940's

Cynthia (Earl) Kerman ’44 died on July 22, 2012. She earned her B.A. at K in philosophy and after graduation worked for the English-born Quaker economist and peace activist Kenneth Boulding at the University of Michigan. She earned her doctorate in American culture and later taught at Villa Julie College. She wrote Creative Tension: The Life and Thought of Kenneth Boulding and co-authored The Lives of Jean Toomer: A Hunger for Wholeness. Kerman was honored with the College's Distinguished Achievement Award in 1979.
Patricia Ann (Thompson) Beightler ’47 died April 22, 2012, at her home in Austin, Texas. She obtained her degree in economics while also being involved in many activities and served as the president of the junior class. She was a member of the Homecoming Queen's court in 1947. She earned a master's degree in business administration from the University of Chicago, where she studied under Milton Friedman. She worked for the Studebaker Corporation. Beightler entered the real estate profession after her children were grown and started her own company.
Frances (Earle) Goostrey ’47 died January 30, 2012, in Cary, North Carolina at age 86. After attending graduate school at Boston University, she returned to Michigan and taught high school physical education and hygiene at St. Clair High School. Goostrey was a long-time volunteer for the Girl Scouts and immersed herself in many other organizations.
Robert Mallory ’49 died June 13, 2012. He earned his degree in chemistry. Mallory served in the Army Air Corps during World War II and was later recalled for the Korean War.
Jean (Richards) Simpson Ten Eyck ’49 died July 24, 2012, at age 84. She was a long-time teacher in the Dearborn, Michigan, public school system. While at K she met Mitchell Kendall "Ken" Simpson '44, and they were married in 1947. He preceded her in death in 1989. She married Andrew Ten Eyck in 1991. A devoted mother and grandmother, Jean spent summers enjoying the environs at Torch Lake in northern Lower Michigan.
William Smith (Ph.D.) ’49 died June 24, 2012, at the James L. West Alzheimer Center. Smith, a professor emeritus at Texas Christian University, earned his degree in chemistry from Kalamazoo College, and a doctorate in chemistry from Brown University in 1954. He did postdoctoral research at Florida State University and the University of Chicago. He worked at Ohio University from 1955 to 1961, rising from an assistant professor to an associate professor. Smith joined the faculty of TCU in 1960 and served as chair of the chemistry department. While chair he saw the expansion of the Ph.D. program in chemistry and worked to obtain a nuclear magnetic resonance imaging machine for the university, a key research tool in organic chemistry and, at the time, only the second one in the state of Texas.

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1950's

Italo Candoli ’50 died April 29, 2012, at age 86. After graduating from K, Candoli earned a master's degree from Western Michigan University and a Ph.D. in Educational Administration from Michigan State University. He was employed as a coach, teacher, administrator, school superintendent, and professor in various locations in Michigan, Ohio, Kansas, and Texas. He authored several textbooks, one of which, Site Based Management, is still in use today.
Carol (Weigle) Hoffman ’50 died May 14, 2012, in Princeton, New Jersey. The Illinois native graduated with degrees in Spanish and sociology. She later attended the National College of Education, in Evanston, Illinois, and the College of New Jersey. Hoffman worked as a teacher. She was involved in her church and as a master gardener, and as a board member of the Lawrence Arts Council.
Louis Brakeman ’54 died on July 20, 2012. He majored in political science and spent a year in India as a Fulbright Scholar. He also was awarded a Danforth Fellowship. Brakeman earned his doctorate in political science from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He taught at Carroll College and Denison University, where he was chief academic officer for 23 years. He then served as provost of Stetson University.
Robert Henry ’54 died on June 29, 2012, after a two-year battle with cancer. A civil engineer, Henry is survived by his wife, Julia, four sons, and 14 grandchildren.

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1960's

Stuart Burke ’63 died on January 13, 2012, at age 69. The Rochester, New York, native earned his B.A. in history at K. After graduation he served as an Army lieutenant in Vietnam. He worked for Xerox Corporation, Preferred Care, the Gannett Foundation, Kodak ,and Rochester Telephone. Burke appeared in print ads and brochures, television commercials, did voiceovers for radio and television ads and performed in amateur theater in Rochester, New York. He and a friend started a company called Show-A-Matic, for which they wrote, produced, and performed humorous routines at trade shows. The pair also started the Rochester Children's Theatre in 1991.
Roberta Lee Nevitt ’68 died on July 27, 2012. She was a social worker, administrator, writer, educator, political activist, exceptional cook, and spiritual seeker who lived fully, productively, and joyfully with and despite her cancer. She earned her B.A. in history at K and studied abroad in Spain. She earned a Master's of Social Work from the University of Maryland in 1973. She also studied at the Institute of Culture and Creation Spirituality at Holy Names University in Oakland, California. She had a deep and abiding interest in history, current events, and the arts and was always knowledgeable and up to date in each of these subjects. Her years of work in hospitals, nursing homes, and with the Baltimore County Department of Aging benefited innumerable people, and her wisdom, courage, humor, and equanimity were a gift to all who knew her. She was active in the environmental movement and was instrumental in establishing the first community supported agriculture project on publicly owned land in Baltimore County.

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1970's

Rufus King ’71 died March 15, 2012, at age 62. An art major, Rufus developed a landscaping business in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area.
Jeremiah Sinnah-Yovonie ’73 died tragically and unexpectedly in a car accident on June 30, 2012, in his hometown of Senehun, Kamajei, Sierra Leone. He dedicated his life to serving others, particularly on behalf of access to education. Sinnah-Yovonie was the first in his family to study in the U.S., arriving with less than $20 to attend Westmar College (LeMars, Iowa). There he met his soul mate, Darlene Kloster, and together they devoted themselves to social issues of the day--peace in Vietnam, improved race relations, and ending apartheid in South Africa. Sinnah-Yovonie transferred to Kalamazoo College and earned his B.A. in psychology in 1973. Shortly thereafter he and Darlene married and began graduate education at the University of Iowa. Sinnah-Yovonie earned a doctorate at Columbia University and a theological degree at Perkins Seminary at Southern Methodist University. He worked for a time as a parole officer and later as a professor and international student director at Bishop College (Dallas, Texas). He then accepted the position of director for global missions for the Lutheran Church and returned to his home Sierra Leone. The civil war there forced his family to relocate in Dallas where he became senior pastor at St. John's Lutheran Church in Oak Cliff. In 2004 he was called to run for the Chieftaincy of Senehun and was inspired to answer that call. He was elected paramount chief of Kamajei Chiefdom in the Moyamba District in 2005 and subsequently elected to represent all the paramount chiefs of Moyamba District in the Sierra Leone parliament. Sinnah-Yovonie was chairman of the parliamentary committee to counsel war victims, and he served as a lecturer at Njala University in the department of teacher education. During his chieftaincy, the people of Senehun benefited from the following development projects--establishment of Kamajei's first junior secondary school; a health center; a market center; a community center; and four drinking water pumps located throughout the town. Ongoing projects include construction of roads and bridges, sharing of annual harvests, and furniture production for the community center. Over the years, Sinnah-Yovonie and Dr. Romeo Phillips, professor emeritus of education, developed a very close relationship. Dr. Phillips attended the several memorial services that occurred in Sierra Leone in early July, and he was one of the speakers (see photo) at the memorial services that was sponsored by and took place in Parliament. To quote one of the many dignitaries that paid tribute to Sinnah-Yovonie: "We lost a great man with a very special quality: the ability to connect with his fellowman. High and low, rich and poor, everywhere,at all times!"
Andrew Angelo ’78 died on July 3 2012. Born into a family of journalists, Angelo retired after 26 years at the Grand Rapids Press where he last served as news editor. He received the 2010 Robinson Prize from the American Copy Editors Association for excellence in copy editing. At K, Angelo earned his B.A. in English and studied abroad in Italy.
Jill Lahti (Ph.D.) ’78 died on May 30, 2012. She earned her B.A. in biology and studied abroad in Madrid, Spain. She earned a Ph.D. from Baylor College of Medicine (Houston, Texas) and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Lahti worked nearly 21 years at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, where she served as an associate member of the Department of Tumor Cell Biology and director of the Cytogenetics Shared Resource. Her greatest hope was that research from her lab and the labs of her students and postdoctoral fellows would ultimately save the lives of those with cancer. Beyond her work at St. Jude and spending time with her family, Lahti found great joy in teaching people to read as a part of the Memphis Literacy Council, traveling to unique parts of the world (including the Antarctica), and enjoying the great outdoors. She is survived by many family members, including her step-brother, Jon Stryker '82.

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1990's

James William "Bill" Geroux ’90 died very unexpectedly from complications of a stroke on August 4, 2012. He graduated from K with a degree in economics and business. He earned a M.B.A. in finance from Walsh College and served as a consultant for a variety of organizations. He treasured his family and many friends and enjoyed music, playing and coaching soccer, spending time with family and friends, and running. He was often seen in his beloved K orange sweatshirt. Geroux was generous in life and that generosity continued through organ donation to several special recipients.

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2000's

Adam Antczak (M.D.) ’05 died on June 18, 2012, in an automobile accident. He earned his B.A. in chemistry and studied abroad in Trinidad. He was a member of the Hornet soccer team. He played goalie and established a single-season record with a .582 goals-against-average for the 2004 season. He earned his medical degree at the University of Toledo Medical School.

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Friends

John Heerspink died June 3, 2012, at age 68. He worked as the planned giving director at Kalamazoo College from 1996 to 2000. Heerspink assisted the College in creating the Stetson Society, recognizing those who give to K through their estate plans. Throughout his time at the College, he worked closely with planned giving donors to create gift arrangements that worked for them. Those gifts and his work continue to benefit the College today. Heerspink is survived by his wife, Jan, two daughters, and three grandchildren.
Hildred "Billie" (Haight) King died on June 25, 2012, in Ocala, Florida. She was former head resident of Trowbridge House and the director of housing and counseling. King was born in Des Moines, Iowa, but spent most of her school years in Omaha, Nebraska. She earned a B.A. in History at Rockford College and attended graduate school at the University of Michigan. "Mrs. King," as she was known to K students in the 70s and 80s, began as Trowbridge head resident in 1970. She presided unobtrusively over Trowbridge students with a deep concern that masqueraded as detachment. She knew, after all, that the last thing most college students wanted was anything remotely resembling the doting mother they had left behind. Her great delight, nonetheless, was to be with any students ready to endure her unsentimental, no-nonsense and occasionally cynical demeanor. She had a remarkable ability to engage with students both as mentor and friend. Many an evening she could be found dining with students in New Welles, where her presence at table fostered a leisurely atmosphere that inspired all to have another cup of coffee before returning to studying. Billie worked hard to make Trowbridge the dorm par excellence of gracious living: sponsoring study breaks, putting jigsaw puzzles in the main lounge to encourage the forging of friendships, and offering up Trowbridge lounge to the antics of the Bozo Brigade. Living in her modest Trowbridge apartment, she always kept her door open and often popped fresh popcorn late at night, the scent of which unfailingly drew hungry students in for a snack. On Sunday mornings, she would drive to Michigan News in downtown Kalamazoo, buy the Sunday New York Times, and bring it back to her Trowbridge apartment, giving students from New York and New Jersey a taste of home and everyone else who dropped by the collective challenge of the Times Sunday Crossword.While working in Trowbridge, she completed her M.A. in counseling at Western Michigan University, a certification that led to her becoming K's director of housing and counseling. She enjoyed the "housing" part of that position distinctly less than the "counseling" part. In the latter role, she set up shop in an inconspicuous office nestled just beneath the staircase to Old Welles, where students could discreetly drop in and slip out. She always offered any student who wished it easy access and ample opportunity to air whatever was on his or her mind. After retiring from K in 1986, King retired and moved to Climax, Michigan, where she restored the ancestral home, a Greek revival house built in 1848. That labor of love eventually earned the house a place on the Michigan Historic Site Registry. From her retirement until she left Michigan in May 2012, many floor advisors and other student staff whom she had supervised at K made pilgrimage to her Climax home during Homecomings and other occasions, finding there the same uncompromisingly liberal, sometimes cynical, yet always gracious host they had known at K. (Obituary by Trent Foley '76)
Charles Ludlow died in Kalamazoo on May 8, 2012. He was a member of the Kalamazoo College Board of Trustees from 1966 to 1969. A magna cum laude graduate of Western Michigan University, he later served on Western's Board of Trustees. Chuck joined The Upjohn Company after graduation, serving in various administrative posts, including treasurer and as a member of Upjohn's Board of Directors. He was also the vice-chairman and treasurer of the Kalamazoo Science Foundation, held leadership positions at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation Trust, the Community Chest (which later became the Greater Kalamazoo United Way), Senior Services Inc., the YMCA, and the Girl Scouts. He was also on the board of Christian Theological Seminary for 11 years.
Carmen (Perez) Romero died on May 17, 2012. She was an English professor for the Colegio Universitario de Caceres, which was the forbear of today's Universidad de Extremadura. Romero helped establish the university's first international programs in the 1980s, which brought students from several different North American universities to the classrooms of the Universidad de Extremadura. Kalamazoo College signed an agreement with the University in 1992, creating a program of Spanish language and culture studies that was directed by Romero until her retirement in 2002. She devoted herself to books, articles and conferences on English literature, and North American literature, and she was a pioneer in the Spanish university system on comparative literature. She was also a writer and translator. Her passion for poetry and her love for knowledge inspired many students. Her dedication to her students, her intellectual and personal honesty, and her integrity made her an exceptional human being. She will be greatly missed by the College and the many Kalamazoo students who studied in Caceres.

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