May 2012

CLASS NOTES

1940's | 1950's | 1960's | 1970's | 1980's | 1990's | 2000's | Friends | In Memory

1960's

Rosemary (Luther) DeHoog ’60 was inducted into the United States Professional Tennis Association (USPTA) Eastern Division's Hall of Fame.She has served the Eastern Division of the USPTA since 1974.She was President of the Eastern Division (1993-95), Professional of the Year (1993), and Major Contributor (1991). She has served on numerous committees and received the Tex Schwab Lifetime Achievement Award in 2002. On the National level, Rosemary served as the National Chairperson of the Women's Committee (1983-86) setting up the network of women's liaisons in all 17 divisions of the USPTA. She became chair of the Women's Committee again in 1997 and has continued to serve in an advisory capacity. She has also been a national tester and has spoken at several USPTA World Conferences. One of her proudest moments in the USPTA was serving on a panel (1994) with Billie Jean King and Bev Raws on "Issues in Women's Tennis." In 1992, DeHoog's book History of the Women's Committee was published by the national USPTA office. In 2005 the National Organization of Women honored DeHoog with the Feminist in Athletics Award, and in 2008 the Big East Athletic Conference gave her the Award for Excellence in Advancing Girls' and Women's Sports. DeHoog is currently the semi-retired head tennis professional of the Drumlins Tennis Club in Syracuse, N.Y., and retired adjunct professor of exercise science at Syracuse University. She continues to be a USTA umpire. As a Hornet she played No. 1 singles for four years and won four MIAA Conference Singles Championships. She won the Sue Little Sportsmanship award in 1960 and was a charter inductee of the Kalamazoo College Athletic Hall of Fame (1986). In 2011 she received the Citation of Merit from the Emeritus Club of Kalamazoo College. DeHoog will be recognized with an inscribed paver in the Avenue of Aces at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.
Steve Hurlock ’63 retired from Boeing almost 10 years ago. Since then, he has been volunteering and working part time at UCLA as a member of a research group in atmospheric spectroscopy. He wrote that he works with people half his age and perhaps twice as smart (if maybe not as wise). He also is enjoying many stimulating events on the UCLA campus. In addition, Hurlock volunteers with the local county Transportation Commission and serves on a board that hears petitions related to violations for the county Air Pollution Control District. Hurlock has been recording textbooks for the blind and dyslexic for nearly 10 years. When he's not involved in these activities, he enjoys his four grand kids and traveling. Last year, for example, he took about seven or eight trips.
Al Strong ’63 and his wife are expecting their 10th grandchild in July of 2012! Al retired in 2006 and formed his own research company, Strong Research, Inc., which continues work with the the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, doing satellite monitoring of coral reefs around the globe. "But now I work on a more relaxed schedule with considerable telecommuting," he wrote.
Barbara (Baker) Walsh ’63 wrote, "For the past 20 years I have worked for an educational foundation, and I feel that I've made a big difference. This next year will be the foundation's 50th anniversary, so we are planning on programs that will address the changes that have happened in the past 50 years. When I call potential speakers they always say they are honored to be asked--we have an unusual reputation. We often get speakers before they get famous! I plan to keep working as long as I can because my job depends on curiosity, so I never get bored. Curiosity does not make you rich, though; it just keeps your mind busy. And making a difference matters. I wish that for the entire Class of 1963."
Robert Sundeen ’67 and John Sowinski were married on September 25, 2011, in Central Park, New York City. Judge Stewart Weinstein, a friend and Brooklyn Family Court judge, presided, and Thomas Schoff and Andrew Wentinck were witnesses. John is a former soloist with American Ballet Theater. Robert wrote, "The recent improvement in the laws of New York State allowed John and me to affirm our 34-year partnership, and we look forward to federal marriage equality."
Janet (McClelland) Bolin ’68 received good news about her first mystery novel. Dire Threads is one of five mysteries nominated for the Agatha award for Best First Novel of 2011. Bolin's second book in the Threadville Mystery series, Threaded For Trouble, comes out in June. The author lives in Ontario with her husband, Bruce Bolin '68 and their dogs.
Dan McKeon ’68 retired in May 2008 from Princeton Theological Seminary as Catalog Librarian Emeritus. He now lives a life of study, focusing on the Bible and German history.

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1970's

Michael Leib ’70 has been selected for inclusion in Top Lawyers, published by Corporate Counsel. Leib has been named to both Super Lawyers and Best Lawyers in America. He works for the Southfield (Michigan) based law firm, Maddin, Hauser, Wartell, Roth & Heller, P.C
Susan Blackwell Ramsey ’72 has won the 2011 Prairie Schooner Poetry Prize for her book A Mind Like This. The University of Nebraska Press will publish the book this coming September.
Larry Banta ’73 has recently been awarded a Fulbright Scholarship for his sabbatical semester in Italy. Banta is a professor of mechanical engineering at West Virginia University. He will be working from January to June of 2013 in Genova, Italy, on hybrid electric generation systems. Banta will be designing advanced control systems for mating Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with a Gas Turbine to make a generation system capable of up to 65 percent efficient conversion of fuel to electric power. Such a system could use coal or other fossil fuels, hydrogen, or biomass and would drastically reduce carbon emissions from electric generation while facilitating carbon capture. Banta earned his B.A. in physics from K and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Georgia Tech. He has taught at West Virginia University for 26 years.
Ken Lampar ’79 is the new director of Macomb Literacy Partners, a nonprofit organization dedicated to reducing illiteracy by training adult volunteers for one-on-one tutoring of basic literacy and English as a second language.

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1980's

David Kenyon ’81 is an attorney in St. Louis, and he has published his debut novel, The Lotus Blossom (Thought Locker Media). The novel explores the life of a suburban teenaged girl who, after experiencing an attempted rape, becomes a student of a meditation and martial arts master. Kenyon wrote the book for his own daughters and uses it to examine the potential for the evolution of consciousness in the Information Age.
Mary Sauer-Games ’83 has been elected to the board of directors of the National Federation of Advanced Information Services. She is currently a vice-president at ProQuest, which she joined in 2002.
Megan Bonanni ’88 has been named partner at the Royal Oak (Michigan) law firm of Pitt, McGehee, Palmer, Rivers & Golden. She concentrates her practice on employment law and has advocated for employee rights in nationwide class actions, group actions, and multiparty cases. She has litigated in federal and state courts and private arbitration. Bonanni is a member of the State Bar of Michigan, Women's Lawyer Association of Michigan (WLAM), Michigan Employment Lawyers Association, and the Macomb County Bar Association. She also is a volunteer attorney for the Epilepsy Foundation, a mentor with WLAM, and a former home co-sponsor and builder with Habitat for Humanity.
Diana (Shirley) Roggenbauer ’88 and her husband, Scott, welcomed their baby, Elle Hunter Roggenbauer, on August 12, 2011.

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1990's

Erin Eileen (Gerrity) Fry ’91 wrote, "Barnaby and I moved to Dallas! Let us know if you are in the area (1551 Oak Lawn Avenue, Apt. 390, Dallas, TX 75207) or hit me up on Facebook."
Randall Blau ’93 has joined the law firm, Buckfire & Buckfire, P.C. He specializes in medical malpractice and received his J.D. from the University of Detroit School of Law in 1996.
Sarah Kruse ’94 was recently named director of university development strategy for Harvard University. In her new role, Sarah will be managing development activities for the university president and coordinating prospect activity across Harvard. Prior to taking this position, Sarah was executive director of alumni relations and resource development at the Harvard Kennedy School. She holds an M.P.A. from Harvard and was a human resources and human relations major.
Vidya Ramesh ’94 married Naveed Kiani on August 27, 2011, at the MGM Grand Detroit. The wedding celebration was filled with Kalamazoo College love from fellow graduates: Kevin Peterson '94, Stacy Shafer Peterson '95, Jennifer Girvin Streeter '94, Tim Streeter '94, Corey Dean '94, Neha Shah Dean '94, Amy O'Hara Walstad '94, Andy Ferris '94, Tony Skoures '94, Tony Youn '94, Michael Lindenmayer '94, Kseniya Lindenmayer, Kim Korson Hyatt '94, Martin Karamon '92, Ana Meire, Sharon Cabansag '94, Vivek Mali '94, Eric Dowd '94, Eiman Gafour, and Lisa Varandani Smith '94.
Jessica Walsh ’95 has published her first book of poems, The Division of Standards (Finishing Line Press). She teaches at Harper College near Chicago.
Alicia Turner ’97 completed her Ph.D. in 2009 and currently is assistant professor of humanities and religious studies at York University in Toronto. She also is the editor of The Journal of Burma Studies.
Kelley (Nyquist) Goldberg ’98 and Aaron Goldberg were married on May 14, 2011, in Sonoma, California. The two live in Las Vegas, Nevada. Kelley is an intellectual property attorney for Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck. Aaron is a commercial real estate advisor for Goliath Company.
Elizabeth (Haas) Zahradnicek ’98 and her husband, Daniel, announce the birth of their daughter, Beatrice. Beatrice was born April 12, 2012. The family lives in Prague, Czech Republic. Elizabeth is the Prague editor for Shop Magazine, and Daniel is a self-employed sound designer and music composer. They were married last summer (August 13 in Prague and September 12 in Lawton, Michigan).
Mellany Flynn ’99 and her husband, Lee Rowton, proudly announce the birth of their son. Matthew Tyler Rowton was born December 27, 2011.
Kory Kramer ’99 has been inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame at Milford (Mich.) High School where he was a successful track and field and cross country runner. Kory was previously inducted into the Kalamazoo College Athletic Hall of Fame. He was an All-American Hornet cross-country runner.

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2000's

Andrea Augustine ’00 is city planner for the City of Kalamazoo and a 2012 nominee for The Young Professionals Leader of the Year Award. The award honors emerging leaders in the community who demonstrate professional excellence, creativity, and initiative in their business or profession. Nominees provide valuable service by contributing time and energy to improve the quality of life for others in the community, and they serve as a role model for young professionals.
Derek Dee ’01 was on campus during a recent spring day. He captured a photograph that he submitted with this caption: "My son and a friend enjoying a beautiful day on the Quad."
Andy Kawel ’01 is thrilled to announce the birth of his son! Julian Conrad Stuart Hurtado-Kawel was born on December 17, 2011. "Julian is a very happy, strong, and intelligent baby," wrote Andy. "He enjoys hanging out with his dad and hopes to attend K!" Andy became an attorney and practices appellate litigation (with a healthy mix of trial work). He founded his own firm and has offices in the District of Columbia and Miami. He can be reached at 202.695.3529 and apkawel@kawellaw.com.
Kirsten Brodbeck-Kenney ’02 is now the director of Driftwood Public Library (DPL) in Lincoln City, Oregon. Kirsten moved to Oregon in November 2010 to take a position as public services librarian at DPL. Before joining the DPL staff, Kirsten was the branch manager and children's librarian at the Kingsessing Branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia. She earned her master's of library and information science from Drexel University in Philadelphia in 2004. Kirsten, her husband Malachi Kenney, and their dog Hank love the Oregon coast, rain and all.
James Cekola ’02 has received an Inn of Court Pro Bono Publica Award for donating more than 300 hours to the Casa Cornelia Law Center's clients' fight for their human rights. Cekola is an associate with the international law firm Morrison & Foerster LLP.
Jeff Fry ’02 married Meghan O'Neill Fry in San Clemente, Calif., on October 7, 2011. In attendance were (l-r): Jules DePorre '02, Julia (Kistka) DePorre '02, Harper DePorre (seven weeks old), Mark Fino '02, Jeff and Meghan, Kyle Walther '02, Tiffany (Shahidehpour) Walther, Jeff Hopcian '02, and J.P. Stephens. Jeff and Meghan live in San Francisco.
Kara Hoorn ’04 was elected as partner in the law firm Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn LLP. She practices in the Corporate and Securities Department in the firm's Kalamazoo office. Hoorn earned her J.D. from the University of Richmond School of Law.
Joel Booth ’05 completed his Ph.D. in computer science at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He now works as a data scientist at Sprout Social, Inc., a local start-up in Chicago that specializes in social media management.
Kelly Clapp ’05 successfully defended her thesis, which was titled "Chaperone-dependent Ubiquitination of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase," and received her Ph.D. in pharmacology from the University of Michigan.
Caleb Kent ’07 completed his Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill this month. He has been seeking and applying for positions. He's doing cutting edge research in solar fuels, has seven publications to his credit, works with Energy Frontier Research Center, and has done some consulting. A paper recently published was based in part on some preliminary research Kent did as part of his Senior Individualized Project at K.
Emma (Perry) Atwood ’08 and Rob Atwood '07 were married on March 3, 2012, at Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Michigan. K friends gathered to celebrate (counter-clockwise from left): Liz Kaselitz '07, Kaitlin Ford '08, Lauren Migliore K'08, Rob and Emma, Lauren Russo '06, Whitney Shattuck '08, Hans Juntunen '07, Jared Randall '07, Tim Kaselitz '07, Dave Kelly '07, and Chris Smart '07. You can contact the Atwoods at perryem@bc.edu or atwood.robert.1@gmail.com. They live in Waltham, Massachusetts. Rob is a social worker at Hospice of the Good Shepherd in Newton, Mass., and Emma is a Ph.D. candidate in English literature at Boston College.
Jimmy Kelly ’08 launched a new sketch website for his comedy team Peanut Attorney. Jimmy lives in Los Angeles.
Elizabeth Lamphier ’08 recently graduated summa cum laude from Michigan State University College of Law. She will be working as an associate with a bankruptcy firm in Grand Rapids, Michigan.
Aubrey Ann Parker ’08 is the assistant editor for Circle of Blue, a Traverse City-based news organization reporting the global freshwater crisis. She recently traveled to the West Bank. Parker--an MIAA Academic Honor Roll runner for Kalamazoo College in 2007--was a photojournalist with the media team following the Run Across Palestine, in which a team of Northern Michigan-based amateur runners embarked upon a 5-day, 129-mile ultra-marathon to raise awareness about the struggles facing modern-day Palestinian olive farmers. She contributed video footage to a seven-part series chronicling the event, and she plans to write an article on water issues related to olive farming for Circle of Blue. Parker is also pitching the story to other various media organizations. She is pictured with a 200-year-old olive tree that was named in her honor.

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2010's

Elyse (Durham) Buffenbarger ’10 will begin work on her Ph.D. in learning sciences at Indiana University this fall. She will study the science of how people learn, which combines educational psychology, cognitive science, computer science, and anthropology. Elyse wrote, "After working with hundreds of students the past several years--of all ages, aptitudes, and backgrounds--I realized that my biggest passion in life is to help others learn. Now I can do that in an effective and far-reaching way. I'll be joining a research team studying assessment and motivation, developing alternatives to standardized tests. I can't wait!"
Takira Lytle ’11 has accepted a contract English teaching position in South Korea. She departed for her assignment in mid-April.

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In Memory

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1930's

Jamesine (Pollock) Gibson ’37 died on March 18, 2012, at age 96. She taught in the Lawton (Michigan) public schools and also taught violin and piano lessons in her home. She was very active in the Lawton community and was a member of St. Paul's United Methodist Church and the Order of the Eastern Star.
Katherine Ann Locher ’38 died on February 29, 2012, at age 95. She retired from The Upjohn Company as an industrial health supervisor. She was a member of St. Augustine Cathedral in Kalamazoo and the Upjohn Camera Club where her work was recognized with several nature photography awards. Locher was also one of America's first female pilots in military service.

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1940's

David Fry ’40 died on February 1, 2012. He earned his B.A. in physics and later graduated from The Ohio State University with a master's degree in physics. His career was in the research division of General Motors Corporation where his work focused on fluid dynamics, high octane fuels, exhaust impurities, spectrographic analysis methods, and greenhouse gas effects, among other subjects. Fry was active for many years in Boy Scouts of America, served on the National Board of the Unitarian-Universalist Association, and was a group leader for the American Society for Testing Materials.
Janet (Sisson) Tift ’40 died in March of 2012 in Kalamazoo. She attended K for two years before transferring to Michigan State University, where she graduated from the School of Social Science. She did social work in Allegan and Kalamazoo Counties and was a homemaker for many years. TIft was an avid gardener, canner, and knitter, and a volunteer for Meals on Wheels for many years.
Clark Bouwman ’41 died on February 7, 2012, at age 92. Clark served in the Merchant Marines during World War II, then earned a doctorate at the New School for Social Research. He was a professor and dean at Florida Presbyterian College from its first classes in 1960 until his retirement 23 years later. He also served as dean of academic services, director of international education and off-campus study at Eckerd College. Clark was also a force as a private citizen. He was a strong advocate for civil rights and labor rights. He fought against "Jim Crow" laws and once spent a night in jail for siding with striking sanitation workers.
Pauli (Hartung) Owens ’42 died on January 24, 2012. She earned her B.A. in sociology and continued her education with a master's degree in social work in 1944. She practiced social work in Michigan, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Washington, and Idaho, and was director of the Whitman County Mental Health Center in Pullman from 1969 until 1985. She was an assistant professor of social work at Washington State University from 1985 to 1987. She also maintained a private practice in clinical social work from 1987 to 1993.
Barbara (Price) Davenport ’45 died on February 16, 2012. She was a flight attendant with Pan American World Airways, taught geography in Portage Central Middle School, and was involved in volunteer work.
Marion (Johnstone) Schmiege ’45 died on February 10, 2012. She graduated from K with a degree in organ and music education and then taught music in the Delton-Kellogg and Kalamazoo public schools. She was a faculty member at Interlochen Music Camp and served as teen director at the YWCA. She lent her creative energy to the Kalamazoo Area Music Teachers Association, Gilmore International Keyboard Festival, Bar Association Auxiliary of Kalamazoo County, and Kalamazoo Symphony Orchestra League, for which she originated and orchestrated the highly popular and successful Oktoberfest. The Kalamazoo College Alumni Council honored her with a Lifetime Achievement Award for her work on behalf of the College.
Clarence Barry ’49 died on March 24, 2012. He was 86. Barry was a master builder of pipe organs and harpsichords. He also served as organist and choir director of many churches, most recently at the First Baptist Church in Exeter, New Hampshire, until his retirement in 1993. He wrote many articles about musical instruments as well as a book about early keyboard instruments that he researched during travels in Europe. He was a 1991 graduate of The School for Lifelong Learning at the University of New Hampshire.

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1950's

William Glennon ’52 died in Kalamazoo on January 25, 2012.
Arthur Edward Hill (Jr.) ’55 died on January 31, 2012, at age 78. During his professional life, Arthur had a successful career working for Ford Motor Company, Capital Records, Central Life Assurance, Pilot Life Insurance, and Universal Plastics.
Helen (Petrick) Floyd ’57 died on February 16, 2011. She was living in Seattle, Washington, to be near her son, Erik, and daughter, Lisa. Froyd served as director of Gentle Winds Farm until 2004. During the past few years she had health problems related to her heart and kidneys, but she remained very positive. According to her college roommate, Barbara Crawford Cross '57, Helen thoroughly enjoyed gardening, and her rose garden gave her much joy.

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1960's

Kyle Haselden ’61 died on June 19, 2011. He matriculated to Kalamazoo College from Charleston, W.V., and there met the love of his life, Carol Seaberg '61. The classmates were married on June 5, 1961. Kyle earned his B.A. from K in biology and earned an advanced degree from Western Michigan University. Kyle and Carol and their family lived in Bay City, Michigan, for 28 years. Kyle retired as district manager for Michigan Vocational Rehabilitation Services. He and Carol then spent more than five years traveling the country, eventually moving to Bellingham, Washington, to be involved with their grandchildren's lives. In addition to Kyle and Carol, other family members that attended K include Kyle's brother Thomas Lee Haselden '72, and Kyle and Carol's daughter, Elizabeth Haselden Monahan '88.
Phillip Yagla ’62 died on March 28, 2012. He earned his B.A. in biology and worked for the Beloit (Wisconsin) Memorial Hospital for 25 years serving as head of the Blood Bank. In 1988, he accepted a position with the American Red Cross Reference Laboratory in Madison. He retired in 2006. He was an active member of Grace Lutheran Church in Madison. Survivors include his wife, Joan (McCormick) Yagla '62.

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2000's

Rachal Badra ’05 died on February 22, 2012, following heart stoppage due to an undiagnosed congenital heart disease. She was surrounded by her family at the time of her passing. Rachal earned her B.A. in history and studied abroad in Rome. She earned her M.A. in archival and museum studies from Duquesne University and then moved to Washington, D.C., where she was employed as a museum assistant at The Phillips Collection. She is survived by her mother, Kris Badra, her father, Bob Badra, who is a Kalamazoo College instructor, and by her sister, Danielle Badra '08.

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Friends

John Moore (Ph.D., J.D. ) died on April 7, 2012. He was associate professor of philosophy at Kalamazoo College from 1964 to 1969. He left K to attend Harvard Law School and earned his J.D. in 1971. He then accepted an appointment in the philosophy department at Northwestern University, where he developed the concept of getting philosophers into specialized law school courses to serve as the basis for doctoral level philosophical thought in those various areas of the law. After Northwestern, he practiced law in Dallas, Texas. He and his wife Elizabeth, who was a major partner in a large national law firm, moved to Gladewater, Texas, (John's hometown) in 1993. Professor Emeritus of Philosophy David Scarrow, a colleague and friend of Moore, wrote, "Although John taught at Kalamazoo College for just a few years he left a wake of scores of students who at their reunions speak of him with reverend admiration. This Texan who came into our northern climes with his warm heart, his down-home stories, his critical thinking, and his spirited optimism became unforgettable." One of those students to whom Scarrow refers is Ed Thompson '68, who wrote about Moore: "He refused all course assignments except introductory classes, but he never taught an intro class the same way twice. The introductory philosophy course I happened to take started with week-old articles on the philosophy of computers. It was exciting and cutting-edge stuff (K had recently purchased its first computer just the year before), and I was shocked to find that boring things like angels dancing on pinheads related to the philosophy of computers! In his class you included a blank cassette when you turned in papers, which he used to provide audio comments on your work. These comments often took the shape of a 30-minute stream of consciousness discussion. Dr. Moore had a frumpy pear-shaped build (or so it seemed back then) that belied the Junior Davis Cup tennis player that he was. As he became completely engrossed in lecturing, he'd unconsciously pull down on his cheeks with his fingers, like gouging clay from a hill side. Everyone remembers that. He was so important to my education, which I suspect is true for many of us."

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