September 2008

CLASS NOTES

1940's | 1950's | 1960's | 1970's | 1980's | 1990's | 2000's | Friends | In Memory

1940's

Eugene Yehle ’41 wrote to note an interesting coincidence: "Four alums find themselves together in Independence Village of Midland, a residence for seniors. The four include myself, my wife, Mildred Hoff Yehle '43, David Fry '40 and Jack Thorsberg '49."

Back to Front Page

1960's

Rosemary DeHoog ’60 is the new women's tennis coach at Le Moyne College (Syracuse, New York). She was formerly the head professional at Drumlins Tennis Club and an adjunct professor of exercise science and coordinator of the tennis program at Syracuse University.
Fred Jackson ’60 is the new president of the Kalamazoo Downtown Lions Club. He began his term July 1. The Lions Clubs (1.5 million members in 200 countries) have been assisting people with vision problems since 1925 and assisting hearing impaired individuals for the past 10 years.
Dick Marsden ’63 is a veteran of 26 years with Naval Aviation. He had the opportunity to travel all over the world for half that time. The remaining years were spent as an Aeronautical Engineering Duty Officer, with much of that time spent in the Washington, D.C., area. When he retired (in California) he launched a second career in the aerospace industry. At the present time Dick is looking forward to retiring yet again in mid-2009. He and his wife, Susan, have "settled" in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Dick has pursued a nearly lifelong interest in wine and has become a certified wine judge and wine educator. With links to the American Wine Society and the Society of Wine Educators, Dick has started two local chapters of the AWS, and he and Susan are currently regional vice presidents for the AWS New Mexico region. Dick also is a trustee on the board of the AWS Educational Foundation. This foundation raises funds to award scholarships to master's and doctoral level students of enology and viticulture at the nation's top universities such as UC-Davis and Cornell. After his second retirement, Dick plans to become more involved in wine pursuits, resume his engagement in nonprofit activities, and spend more time with family. "I regret not being able to attend the 45th reunion due to an overload of commitments, but I look forward to our future reunions." Email dickmars@fastwave.biz
Richard Clapp ’65 sends the following contact information: 426 S. Shore Drive, Sarasota, FL 34234. Email RTClapp@verizon.net
Bill Barrett ’66 wrote, "I have returned from four weeks in Australia and five days in Hong Kong. Australia is as large as the United States, but its 21 million people live on a million square kilometers along the east and southeast coasts and Perth in the southwest. The remaining six million square kilometers are arid, barren, and virtually empty, save for a few towns hundreds of miles apart. It was through this area (think Washington to Los Angeles and New Orleans to Minneapolis) that my son Jonathan and I traveled in a rental car; on a two-day train ride across the Nullarbor (Latin for 'no trees') Plain; with a guide in a 4WD making a long loop around the center of the continent; in planes logging hours of flying time over nothingness. I still can't fathom a country so vast, flat, arid, and empty. (Read Bill Bryson's Sunburned Land). Even the Sahara, equal in size and shape to the U.S. and Australia, had more inhabited places and changes in topography. I spent three weeks there in January 2006. Hong Kong was a stark contrast: seven million people living in thousands of high rise apartments and working in office buildings in an area not much larger than Manhattan Island. The sidewalks and streets were so crowded with people and buses that one could not walk at a normal pace. Ingrid and I have enjoyed countless travel adventures, but she does not share my fondness for long desert journeys (and Australia is 80 percent desert). She took a small cottage just a few yards from the ocean on Cape Cod and spent three weeks in personal retreat with time for reading and reflection, and brief visits from Christina and Elizabeth. She returned from her three weeks by the sea refreshed and renewed for her ministry."
Terry Brown ’66 retired as Bishop of Malaita (in the Solomon Islands) on August 18. He served in that position for 12 years. In May he completed his fifth and last synod, a gathering of all the clergy and lay representatives (about 145) of parishes and diocesan institutions, held for one week every three years. During his tenure as Bishop the diocese grew from 32 to 45 parishes (415 congregations). It includes a lay training center for catechists and those pushed out of secondary school (with courses in carpentry, mechanics, life skills and home economics, and agriculture), a clinic, a secondary school, four religious communities, and extensive diocesan programs. There are some 35,000 Anglicans (Episcopalians) in the Diocese. In July Brown attend the Lambeth Conference in England. (You can read his journal here.) Lambeth is a meeting that occurs every 10 years at the invitation of the Archbishop of Canterbury. It includes leaders of those churches who find their common parentage in the Church of England, and it provides the opportunity to discuss common concerns and reaffirm bonds of affection. Terry was involved in the lead-up to Lambeth as a member of the Anglican Primates' Taskforce on Theological Education (TEAC) as one of the conveners. He also was involved as one of the authors of the "Listening Process" study guide on the controversial area of homosexuality, work that had taken him to London, Johannesburg, and Singapore. Both groups presented their work at Lambeth. During the conference Terry preached at the Melanesian Mission Festival at St. Martin-in-the-Fields. He also preached at two other London parishes and one in Cambridge. After Lambeth he returned to the Solomon Islands for a round of ordinations, confirmations, and consecrations of church buildings before his retirement. Then it was time for a two-month holiday. "I am planning to return to the Solomons in my retirement to work on the church archives and help with theological education and the founding of a new Church of Melanesia University," said Brown. "The difference will be not having a diocese to look after, which will be a welcome relief." Brown is pictured in the back row, at center.
Sharon (Young) Cherry ’66 retired in 2006 after 28 years at the University of South Carolina Upstate. This academic year, however, she got "sucked back into the profession" and now teaches Spanish at Furman University. "It hasn't been tough, though," she wrote. "My husband has been on the faculty here for more than 35 years. I know everybody, and the best part is that it's only two miles from my house instead of the 35 I used to travel." Email sharon.cherry@furman.edu
Mary (Van Atta) Kelly ’66 and her husband, Gerry, have opened an English Pub and Steak House, The Waterside Inn, on Lake Conroe, one of the largest man-made lakes in Texas, 40 miles north of Houston in Montgomery. "Even though the economy is tanking, I still feel good about his place," wrote Mary. "People may not be running around in their boats so much but would rather sit and drink and eat and look at the water. (It's got to be cheaper!). Gerry's long time friend and partner, with whom we are opening the Waterside Inn, owns several ice skating rinks and pubs and restaurants around Britain and has bought a house here, right across from the restaurant. Gerry's background is in hotel and resort, conference center and country club management. We lived in England for four years and had our own old pub and bed and breakfast, so we have lots of experience."
David Kyvig ’66 was a keynote speaker at a discussion titled "The Age of Impeachment: American Constitutional Culture Since 1960." The discussion was sponsored by the Division of United States Studies at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and occurred in mid-May in Washington, D.C. Commentators included James Reston, Jr., senior scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center, and Linda Greenhouse, Supreme Court reporter for the New York Times. David is a distinguished research professor in the department of history at Northern Illinois University and the author of several books, including his most recent, from which the conference title was taken. Kyvig noted the contrast between the use of impeachment between 1789 and 1960 (rarely) and after 1961 (often). He suggested that impeachment has become the "canary in the mine shaft," a sign of an increasingly toxic political culture. However, the unintended (and paradoxical) legacy of recent impeachment efforts may be an enhanced presidential power and a tightened control over information about actions taken by the White House. Several alumni attended the event (l-r): Tom Hipple '65, Charles Haberlein '67, and Amy Hale '66. David Kyvig is seated.
Dennis Stover ’66 was appointed to the board of directors of Artha Resources Corporation, a uranium mining company. Stover is a pioneer and leader in the application of new technology to the in-situ leaching of uranium. He has authored or co-authored more than 30 articles relating to uranium and holds six U.S. patents concerning various aspects of solution mining and reservoir restoration. He is currently the executive vice president of Americas for Uranium One.
Deanna (Hultquist) Tiefenthal ’66 was one of five "K" graduates who sang the Kalamazoo Fight Song on their way down a Maya pyramid in Tikal, Guatemala--probably the first time "Reckity X, Ko-X, Ko-X ..." had been heard in that location. The other vocalists included three other 1966 classmates--Jim Tiefenthal, Beth (Neubert) Myers, Dick Myers--and Ruth (Neubert) Stuart '70, Beth's sister, who traveled with her non-"K" husband, Dick, who took the photo. The group was exploring the "Route of the Maya," visiting not only ruins from the Maya classical period but also meeting and visiting many current-day Maya. "We're still exploring other cultures," wrote Deanna, "a legacy of our foreign study days. Thank you, 'K!'" Pictured are (l-r): front row--Dick and Ruth; back row--Jim and Deanna; at far right--song leader Beth. Email deanna@tiefenthal.com
Mary (Brubaker) Wilsted ’66 wrote, "Well, it is finally official. has retired and we have sold our house." After closing on July 11 they left Connecticut for Arizona. They downsized by selling off about 90 percent of their belongings in order to "start over in a much more minimalist fashion. We have a very small furnished condo in Green Valley, a retirement community just south of Tucson, where we will live until we decide exactly where we want to live--possibly in Green Valley, but definitely in the Tucson area."
Marcia (Dean) Frank ’68 is recently retired. "I enjoy life with my dog, Jack, in the beautiful Finger Lakes region of New York," she wrote. "I plan on doing a bit of traveling. I do have one state left to see, Alaska." Email mfrank@rochester.rr.com
Martha "Marty" (Campbell) Adamson ’69 and her husband, Kurt, retired in May 2008. Kurt retired as associate director of the Underwood Law Library at Southern Methodist University. Marty retired as executive director of libraries at Collin College. They plan to remain in Dallas, Texas. Email marty_adamson@hotmail.com

Back to Front Page

1970's

Paul Burnam ’72 has joined the Methodist Theological School in Ohio as director of the library. He has enjoyed a distinguished career in library administration. Prior to accepting the position at MTSO he was public service librarian and coordinator of bibliographic instruction at Ohio Wesleyan University. At OWU he also served as coordinator of reference and online services. MTSO is a graduate seminary preparing men and women of many faiths for church leadership. Email pburnam@mtso.edu
David Nelson ’72 has published the book Solkattu Manual: An Introduction to the Rhythmic Language of South Indian Music. The book is the first step-by-step introduction to South Indian spoken rhythm intended for college classroom use. David studied abroad in India at "K," and during that time he studied the mrdangam, South Indian music's principal percussion instrument. In his first lesson he was introduced to Solkattu, the rhythm language that is the subject of his book. David is a member of the music faculty of Wesleyan University, where he is an artist-in-residence in South Indian music.
Mark McDonald ’73 is back in the field and back in Asia after teaching for two years at University of Michigan. He is an editor for the International Herald Tribune in its Hong Kong office. He'd worked for the paper some years ago in its Paris office. He spent three years in Moscow as the bureau chief for Knight Ridder and four years in Hanoi as the Southeast Asia Bureau Chief for the San Jose Mercury News. In May he spent 10 days covering the horrific cyclone in Myanmar (Burma) for both the Tribune and the New York Times. The junta was barring journalists, but McDonald managed to finagle a tourist visa, sneak in, sneak around, and sneak out.
Melissa Eddy ’74 recently moved to Kingsland, Texas, in the Texas Hill Country outside Austin. She continues to work in Austin as executive director of the Classical Music Consortium of Austin and development manager of the choral organization, Conspirare. She is also editor of the quarterly journal of Mu Phi Epsilon international professional music fraternity. In June she stepped down from the board of trustees of Austin's new Long Center for the Performing Arts, a project she has been involved with for 14 years, from when it was just an idea to its grand opening in Spring 2008. She regularly sings with the Conspirare Symphonic Chorus and in July performed with the Texas Choral Consort in the touring show "Video Games Live" at the Long Center. Melissa enjoys gardening, reading, walking, and home improvement projects, as well as time with her family: two stepdaughters, two dogs, two cats, and her husband, Tracy Schiemenz. She can be reached at meddycvch@aol.com. Email meddycvch@aol.com
David Heckman ’74 died on May 4, 2008. After graduating from "K" he continued his education at Temple University in Philadelphia. He was a vice president for human resources at Landmark Cablevision. He made a career change and became the owner of the Charleston Cafe. He lived in Surfside Beach, South Carolina.
Susan Holt ’75 is vice president of development for National Jewish Health, a prominent research and clinical care hospital in Denver.
Mark Jackson ’75 was one of five members to the Kalamazoo Downtown Lions Club to receive the club president's certificate of appreciation for exemplary performance of duties and for leadership contributions to Lions Clubs International. The Lions Clubs (1.5 million members in 200 countries) have been assisting people with vision problems since 1925 and assisting hearing impaired individuals for the past 10 years.
Gary Jones ’75 recently returned to his roots by purchasing a home in Kalamazoo. He splits his time evenly between California and Kalamazoo. Email GaryMiami@aol.com
Neil Dorsey ’78 and classmate Steve Stankewicz enjoy an annual "K" weekend outing at Steve's cottage on Crystal Lake. This year's outing was no exception. Pictured are (l-r): Steve, Spencer Krane, Don Pobuda, Rusty Meska, Neil, Tom Wilkinson, Al Taracuk, and Steve Galas. All are members of the Class of 1978 Email mndorsey@comcast.net
David Francis ’78 , professor and chair for the department of psychology at the University of Houston (UH) was awarded the 2008 Esther Farfel Award, UH's highest accolade recognizing faculty excellence. The award includes a trophy and a $10,000 cash prize. David was key in founding the National Research and Development Center for English Language Learners, a project that focuses on literacy and English language development of Spanish-speaking elementary and middle school students. He also was among the researchers who founded the Texas Center for Learning Disabilities.
Peter Jensen ’78 died on July 13, 2008. He earned his degree in economics, and he studied abroad in Erlangen, Germany. He worked as a financial specialist for the pharmaceutical company Merck.
Mary Ellen Geist ’78 is the author of Measure of the Heart: A Father's Alzheimer's, A Daughter's Return, which was published in August. Mary Ellen is one of the millions of daughters and sons who left jobs (she was a successful radio journalist in San Francisco) to return home to help care for a parent suffering from Alzheimer's disease. Her story and advice will inspire and inform many of the 44 million caregivers in America. Mary Ellen appeared on the Today Show to talk about the book in early August.
Tim Meier ’78 took his Jesuit training overseas to serve as a chaplain in Iraq. He enlisted earlier this year and, at age 51, made it through boot camp and was deployed the end of June.
Tim Van Valen ’78 has joined the law firm of Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck as senior counsel. He works in the firm's Albuquerque office in its corporate and business department. His practice focuses almost exclusively on state and local tax matters, including administrative and judicial litigation, planning, refund claims, managed audits, incentives, legislation, and regulations.
Fred Deutsch ’79 continues to enjoy gracious living in the wondrous land of South Dakota. An education and childhood advocate, he was recently elected to serve as President of the Watertown, South Dakota, School Board. He is one of the few school board bloggers in the U.S. Fred and his wife Kathleen recently celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary with an adventure to Ireland. They are preparing to become empty nesters, with three daughters gone from their home and one daughter still in high school. Email freddeutsch@wat.midco.net

Back to Front Page

1980's

Danny Agustin Flores ’80 works for the Skye Blue Organization. One of his recent projects is a collaboration to create an information resource tool on recent developments in agronomy and its impact on food, alternative energy sources, and animal nutrition and production science. Email danny06@telus.net
Peter Charlton ’81 is the chief executive and chief creative officer of Ricochet Partners, an advertising agency in Portland, Ore. Ricochet created a new advertising campaign for Holcim US, the American subsidiary of a Swiss cement, aggregate and building materials producer. The campaign was the subject of an article in the New York Times that quoted Charlton.
Sarah Woodson ’82 is a professor of biophysics at Johns Hopkins University. Through her research, she and her colleagues and students seek to understand how RNA folds into biologically active structures and how the mechanisms of that folding determine the assembly of RNA-protein complexes. RNA molecules are vital to everything that genes do, including the making of proteins, which are the fundamental building blocks of life and organisms.
Bette Benedetto Watkins ’83 wrote, "In March my former boss and I started a business called 'The Reading Writing Connection.' We teach reading, spelling, and some math to students with dyslexia, and we provide teacher training for both classroom teachers and people who will work for us. We are focusing on the Jackson (Michigan) community and applied for non-profit status so we can solicit funds to provide scholarships for students from needy families." Email watkinsjb@netzero.net
Gary Koehler ’83 ran the December 2008 Honolulu Marathon, his third. "The first two were the National AIDS Marathon, raising more than $12,000," he wrote. "Because the AIDS Marathon did not participating in Honolulu this year, I ran on my own to benefit the San Francisco AIDS Foundation/Pangea Global Aids Foundation." Gary and his partner, Brad Crowell, have been happily together for 17 years "and look forward to many more adventures together. We enjoy backpacking, hiking, cooking, travel, and walks on the beach with our Samoyed, Stoli." Recent trips have included Botswana, Zambia, and South Africa. Email gwkoehler@aol.com
(Rabbi) Michael Ungar ’85 was invited by the Jewish Studies Department to give a presentation at the College about his congregation's Mission to Cuba in March of 2008. The Mission brought medical and religious supplies to the island's 1,500 Jews. Ungar (pictured, second from right, with, l-r: Jennie Smith '08, Jeff Haus, and K'tanaw Schiff '10) also addressed the Modern Jewish Experience class on the topic of "Challenges in the Modern Rabbinate." He lives in Columbus, Ohio, with his four children. Email mungar@tiferethisrael.org
Thomas Petroff (D.O.) ’86 recently joined the Ingham Regional Medical Center (Lansing, Mich.) as vice president of medical affairs. He has been in practice as an obstetrician and gynecologist for more than 13 years and holds appointments as assistant professor in both the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine and Human Medicine. He was appointed by Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm to chair the Michigan Task Force for Preventing Unintended Pregnancies.
Pat Beyer ’87 --President of Stryker Europe, Middle East, and Africa--addressed a capacity crowd of Kalamazoo College athletes in August. The former Hornet football player and economics major gave a talk titled "An International Leadership Career." Pat has spent much of his 19-year career as an executive with Stryker Corporation living overseas--in Germany, France, the United Kingdom, and Switzerland. He elaborated upon the strong connection between his participation in intercollegiate athletics and his successful business career. The former, he said, helped him learn valuable lessons about high expectations, hard work, team work, and leadership, all of which he has applied to his work at Stryker. He ended his talk by stressing the importance of what he called "the search for the potato," a metaphor (harking back to Sir Walter Raleigh's presentation to Queen Elizabeth I of a potato, a new discovery from the new world) for the primacy of continual exploration in business and in learning. Exploration is not dead, he insisted, but if we become lazy then the explorers will not be us. And, he cautioned, in business and in learning, it is the explorers that are successful. "Find the potato before it lands on your doorstep," he said. The event was jointly sponsored by the athletic department and the economics department.
Andrew Luedders ’88 wrote, "After 17 years in Germany, my post-graduate 'K'-Plan has included career stops in Bonn, Frankfurt, and now Munich. I left Deutsche Telekom last fall to join EM Sport Media as head of product development and IT. My partner Jake and I are enjoying our new home in Bavaria." Email a.luedders@t-online.de
Harold "Harley" Phillips ’88 left Washington, D.C., five years ago and moved to Boston. He works as an independent consultant in the field of health policy and programs, specializing in HIV/AIDS. Email HJPhillips@comcast.net
Anne (Schwartz) Brown ’89 wrote a note last May to Professor of Sociology Bob Stauffer, congratulating him on his retirement. The shared news of Anne's family's vacation in Mexico (see photo) and about her husband, Doug Brown's, new book Just Do It. Anne wrote, "The other big news is that Doug will publish a book in June. I figure I better tell you about it before you hear about it from elsewhere. We 'did it' back in 2006, so it's a little off my radar at the moment, but will soon be back on full force. We are going to be on the Today Show on June 23 and then some other morning show called Mike and Juliet, as well as being featured in Redbook and Men's Health in July. Oh, and the New York Times is running a piece on the book in its Style section mid-June because, believe it or not, we have competition. Apparently another couple had the same idea, but they did it 365 days (I'm referring to her just as "The Slut"). But, they are opposite of us -- hardcore Republicans, she goes to a Bible study group, Southern, etc. It's more like Red State Sex vs. Blue State Sex. And why we did the book is a long story that will be told soon enough."
Cathy Fortney ’89 presented "Lean-Workup Process" in February at the International Bone Marrow Transplant Tandem Meeting in San Diego. She currently is working on an MBA in health care administration through Baker College. She recently took on an additional role as service excellence champion for the Transplant Institute of Henry Ford Hospital. "We also are visiting colleges with our 16 year old, and he has some interest in Kalamazoo College," Cathy wrote. "He is interested in international business. My husband, Steve, is still settling into his role as vice president of public funds at Charter One Bank." Email cfortnel1@hfhs.org
Janine (Bologna) Velasco ’89 was one of 10 federal government staff selected to receive the 59th annual Arthur S. Flemming Award, hosted by George Washington University. The award honor individuals with three to 15 years of exemplary service in the fields of applied science, engineering, and mathematics; basic science; and managerial and legal achievement. Velasco was honored for her work as assistant director of human capital management at the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management. She leads the bureau's efforts in strategic planning and budgeting, program evaluations, organizational management, and finance. Since 2006 she also has helped managed the bureau's workforce of 10,000, some 35 percent of whom will be eligible for retirement within a few years. Her efforts have improved the effectiveness of leadership recruitment and development, decreased administrative burdens, and built the bureau's capacity to fulfill its mission. She is pictured with George Washington University President Steven Knapp.
Pat Walsh ’89 and his wife, Kelly, had their second child. Their daughter, Brigit Catherine, was born on January 30, 2008. She joins older brother, Owen, who was born in March of 2006. Email walsh1985@yahoo.com

Back to Front Page

1990's

Dan Wort ’90 and Rob Butryn got together to participate in a Sprint Triathlon in Interlochen, Mich. Both finished among the top 50 racers. Rob is an opthamologist in Traverse City, and Dan is a marketing manager in Plymouth, Ind. Email dwort@farminnovators.com
Paul Kielwasser ’91 joined Endo Pharmaceuticals as a sales rep for the Monroe, Louisiana, territory. He also was named associate director of Catholic Campus Ministries at the University of Louisiana-Monroe. He lives in Monroe with his wife, Amie, and their children, William and Helen Claire. Email pkielwa@hotmail.com
Joseph Attia ’92 and his wife, Mary, welcomed their second child to the world on July 2, 2008. Jasmine Joseph Attia joins her 15-month old brother, Jeremy. Email joseph.attia@alumni.virginia.edu
Jen Feuerstein ’93 travels back and forth between Save the Chimps' two sanctuaries in Alamogordo, New Mexico, and Fort Pierce, Florida. "I'd love to connect with 'K' grads in both states." Email chimpjen@yahoo.com
Heather (Carstens) Foxman ’94 and her husband, Eric, announce the birth of their son, Bruce Foxman. Bruce was born on February 2, 2008. Email tallhobbits@tds.net
Genna (Beaudoin) Gent ’94 is Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm's deputy chief of staff. On June 9 Gent began directing the state's Washington, D.C., office. She continues to be involved in message and strategic decisions for the governor. On a personal note, "Chad and I are now a family of four," Genna wrote. "The addition of Charlie 'Firecracker' Gent made us a family of four on July 4, 2007, but we forgot to share the news. We've recently relocated to Arlington, Virginia. Chad continues to run his learning management software business from home." Email gennagent@yahoo.com
Elizabeth (Rettig) Konczal ’94 married K. David Konczal in July 2005. On February 23, 2008, Elizabeth and David welcomed their son, Charlie (see photo). The family lives in the northwest suburbs of Chicago. Email LKonczal@comcast.net
Stacy (VanAntwerp) Rijssenbeek ’94 and her husband, Job, and their son, Lucas, welcomed Noah into their family in early March. "Noah loves to eat, grow, and smile," wrote Stacy. "I'm taking several months off to spend with the boys, and then I'll return to my part-time position at the Counseling Center at SUNY-Albany." Email s_vanantwerp@yahoo.com
Anjalee (Deshpande) Nadkarni ’95 has relocated from Syracuse, New York, to Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, to begin a new teaching and directing position at Bucknell University. In one month she gave notice at Le Moyne, bought a Prius, and bought a house. Her son Akash (see photo) turned three in May and will attend preschool in Lewisburg. "I send a big THANKS out to Jenn Rae Moore, G8s Otsuji, and Mike Wells, who helped me get the job and move. Aunt Jenn nannied while I was interviewing! Anyone out my way please call or feel free to find me on facebook (my students made me do it)." Email anjalee2121@gmail.com
Bill Thoms ’95 and his family were recently recognized as "Family of the Year" for all of North Carolina by the Knights of Columbus, a Catholic men's charitable service organization. Bill serves as Finance Council chair and Knights of Columbus Financial Secretary for the local council. He coaches youth flag football and basketball and provides his CPA services to other parishes when needed. He sings in his parish Hispanic and English choirs. Alma, his wife, serves as lector and educator and coordinates Catholic youth retreats. Email bill@dixie-general.com
Stephanie (Gorman) Foote ’96 and Will Foote were married on November 3, 2007, in a sunset ceremony performed by former "K" cross country coach Peter Gathje. Will, an Arizona native, and Stephanie reside happily in Scottsdale, Ariz. Email stephaniegfoote@yahoo.com
Amy Kleine ’96 wrote last May, "The journey of life continues to take me in new directions, though some things have not changed. I am still living in Baltimore, and am still an active member of the Baltimore Rowing Club (I competed at Head of the Charles last fall). I will leave Jhpiego at the end of May, where I have been an International Women's Health Program Manager for the past five years, to join the Harry & Jeanette Weinberg Foundation as a program officer. I am thrilled to be marrying Jeff Ditter in October." Email ankleine@yahoo.com
Mara Bragg ’97 and her husband, Aaron Elstein '91, announce the birth of their son, Evan Sam Elstein. Evan was born peacefully at home, as planned, with midwives in attendance on May 8, 2008. Everyone is doing well. Email mara1602@hotmail.com
Christa Clapp ’97 is an economist at the United States Environmental Protection Agency, where she analyzes climate change policy. She returned to Kalamazoo College in April to be part of an alumni panel for the College's new Sustainability Guild. She was impressed by the caliber of current students! Her husband, Andre Aasrud, works at the World Bank on reforestation projects in developing countries. Christ and Andre live in Washington, D.C. Email christaclapp@hotmail.com
Jen (Korb) Janke ’97 wrote, "I am staying at home with my two boys, Ethan (4) and Gabriel (2), and trying to stay in good enough shape to compete in some triathlons. It's been an amazing blessing to focus my efforts on raising these two bold little men! I wouldn't trade it for anything. We're in the Detroit area, so come on over and play with us if you're around!" Email jen.janke@juno.com
Beckie (Craft) Hernandez ’98 wrote, "After a brief but lovely stint in upstate New York, I returned to South Bend, Indiana, to get my teacher's license and master's degree in secondary education. I am currently teaching pre-IB and regular Spanish classes at John Adams High School in South Bend. One year ago my husband Arlex and I welcomed Cristian Samuel (Sam) Hernandez into the world (see photo). Email beckie.hernandez@gmail.com
Matt Sheeran ’98 wrote, "I've been living in northern California (Sacramento area, specifically) for the last five years. In that time, I got married, completed my MBA from the University of California-Davis, and, most recently, my wife and I had our first baby." He's pictured with his wife, Kellie, and their son, Benjamin. Email mattsheeran@hotmail.com
Paul Unwin ’98 and his wife, Kam Yee, and their daughter, India, welcomed Hero Helena Unwin into their lives on December 23, 2007. The happy family lives in Seattle, Washington. Email pdunwin@yahoo.com
Brian Alexander ’99 is one of 14 White House Fellows (2008-2009 class) announced in June by the President's Commission on White House Fellowships. Brian is a physician resident at the Harvard Radiation Oncology Program. His cancer research work has been published in peer-reviewed journals, and he also works as a policy analyst and consultant for the Massachusetts Division of Healthcare Finance and Policy. The White House Fellows Program offers exceptional individuals first-hand experience working at the highest levels of Federal government. Selection is highly competitive and based on a record of remarkable professional achievement, evidence of leadership skills, and strong commitment to public service. Fellows participate in an education program consisting of roundtable discussions with leaders from the private and public sectors. They also engage in study trips to examine U.S. policy in action. Following the Fellowship year, the Fellows repay the privilege by contributing to the country as better national leaders and public servants.
Sarah Goralewski ’99 and Thomas Weinmann were married in beautiful, blustery Big Sur (Calif.) on April 19, 2008. They live in the San Francisco Bay Area, where Sarah works for the city of Mountain View as an urban planner. Email sarah.goralewski@gmail.com
Stacey Saunders ’99 wrote, "Dave and I are in northern Wisconsin with our two children: Kate (almost 3) and Jake (six months, see photo). Dave works in human resources for Kraft Foods, and I work as a family therapist. Email staceyesaunders@gmail.com
Kathryn (Huskey) Soulier ’99 has joined the law firm of Miller Canfield as an associate in the Kalamazoo office. She focuses her work on intellectual property, life sciences and biotechnology, and litigation and dispute resolution. She specializes in patent and licensing matters and represents large and small domestic and international medical device, biotechnology, and pharmaceutical companies.
Kelly (LaCosse) Waterstredt ’99 and Jeff Waterstredt announce the birth of twins! Mia Elizabeth and Liam Jeffrey were born on April 24, 2008. They live in Royal Oak, Mich., with big sister Anna and their parents. "The twins were a BIG surprise," wrote Kelly, "and they are keeping me very busy and very happy." Email kellyannlacosse@yahoo.com

Back to Front Page

2000's

Heather Booth ’00 wrote, "It's been a busy year. In the spring my book Serving Teens Through Readers' Advisory was published by ALA Editions. In October, Paul and I celebrated the birth of our daughter, Julia Celeste Booth Zaremba (granddaughter to Gayle and Jim Booth '73). I recently transitioned to a part-time teen librarian position, and I love the extra time that affords me to spend with Julia and to continue to write and work on other fun projects." Email heather@tonekids.com
Sarah Ovink ’00 was awarded the National Science Foundation Dissertation Research Improvement Grant for her dissertation, tentatively titled "Mexican-Americans and the College Attendance Gap." Sarah is working on her Ph.D. in sociology at the University of California-Davis.
Sam Brockington ’01 recently completed his Ph.D. in plasma diagnostics at the University of California-Davis. He works in magneto inertial fusion research in the Washington, D.C., area.
Richard Cherry ’01 is married to Katie Hall Cherry and works with the State Attorney's Office in Cook County, Illinois. Email cherryrichard@msn.com
Jessica (Hoff) Berzac ’02 married Chris Berzac on June 21, 2008, in Fresno, Calif., Jessica's hometown. Jessica and Chris come from theatrical backgrounds, evident in their wedding photo, which includes some great Kalamazoo College friends who celebrated with the couple (l-r): Matt Pieknik '04, Erin Ashmore '04, Jessica, Sarah Huckabay '01, Felicity HunzekerHesed '00, Aaron Lipke '98, and Chris. Email jesshoff@gmail.com
Becky Bielang ’02 wrote, "I finally got that M.D. I'm now in New York City doing my residency in internal medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center. Now that the dust has settled, I hope I'll have some time to meet up with the 'K' alumni out there. It was great catching up with many of you at the reunion last October! I'm sure five more years will go by even faster. Thanks to all of my friends and family for helping me reach this milestone in my life." Email rbielang@gmail.com
Michael Carlson ’02 was one of 14 elementary educators in the state of Colorado to spend four weeks of travel and study in Japan this past summer. He was part of the prestigious program Texts and Contexts: Japan Through Children's Literature conducted by the University of Colorado at Boulder. He toured cultural and historical sites, met with scholars, visited with elementary teachers and students, and participated in curriculum development sessions. He engaged in an independent study project to develop curriculum for his classroom and conducted workshops for other teachers in his district. Mike teaches fourth grade at Charles Hay Elementary in Englewood. Email MichaelCarlson@englewood.k12.co.us
Stephanie (Schrift) Fletcher ’02 married John-Paul Fletcher in November 2007. She is finishing her PPS credential in school counseling this fall. She currently lives in southern California. Her wedding party included (l-r): Jeannette (Cooper) Srivastava '00, Amanda Czarnecki '02, Sarah Schrift, Stephanie, Helena Zarate-Simolin, and Brook Cunningham. Email stephanie.fletcher@live.com
Heather Reddy ’02 and Steve Libbey were married in an elopement at Voodoo Donut in Portland, Oregon, on August 12, 2008. They live in Portland, where Steve is a writer, musician, and IT manager. Heather is a writer, arts organizer, and graduate student in public health at Portland State University. Brian Slagle '05, who met Heather for the first time in Portland, was present for the ceremony, which included storytelling, keytars, jumping over a broom, and praying to Isaac Hayes. Steve and Heather plan to live in Portland forever. Email reddy.heather@gmail.com
Kristin Stahley ’02 is one of seven "runners up" for USA Weekend's "Most Caring Coach Award," a distinction that drew more than 1,900 nominations nationwide. Kristin coaches young swimmers, ages 9-14, for the Lansing (Mich.) Capital Area Swim Team (CAST). She's an excellent coach. Seven of the 13 swimmers named to the Lansing State Journal's girl's swimming "Dream Team" had been coached by Kristin. In the photo she's flanked by two of her CAST swimmers, who happen to be the top two finishes in the 1650 freestyle at the Michigan Junior Olympic Swim Meet. She coaches despite a painful six year battle against rhabdomysarcoma, a rare form of muscle tissue cancer that causes multiple tumors throughout the body. When Kristin was first diagnoses she was given the grim prognosis of just six months to live. Experimental treatments have prolonged her life, but her battle is ongoing. Twice each week she goes to Ann Arbor for debilitating chemotherapy treatments, one side effect of which has been the development of leukemia. None of that stops her coaching. She also attends graduate school, seeking a master's degree in public policy and administration. She hopes to work in nonprofit management or health services policy, and she shares her career aspirations with her young swimmers. Her nominators wrote, "At the pool she's a no-nonsense disciplinarian who pushes her swimmers to establish and achieve high goals in the pool and in the classroom. Away from the pool, she's a trusted friend living her life in a way that's a source of inspiration to her swimmers and their families."
Kate VanTreese ’02 recently moved to rural New Hampshire to begin a position as an outpatient therapist at a community mental health center. Email katevt@umich.edu
Elizabeth (Huyck) Post ’03 and her husband, Ben Post, live in Maple City, Michigan (near Sleeping Bear Dunes). Elizabeth recently earned her Master's in Social Work from Grand Valley State University. She works for Goodwill. Email elizabethkpost@yahoo.com
Theresia Radtke ’03 and Jerry Perez were married September 1, 2007 at the Ann Arbor Maathai Botanical Gardens and celebrated their marriage in downtown Plymouth, Mich., at the Meeting House Grand Ballroom. They live in Ann Arbor. Theresia manages her home based business in health and wellness, nutrition, and helping people create green homes and businesses. Jerry is a North American account representative for FANUC Robotics Toledo. Pictured are (l-r): Ben Tucker, Kim Hartman, Bernadette Lum, Ashley Thompson, Jon Fazola, Theresia and Jerry, Ben Callum, Nicole Finnemann, Mondy Jamshidi, and Merilee Valentino. Email TheresiaAnne@yahoo.com
Amanda (Wagner) Ricketts ’03 and her husband, Bobby, welcomed Brady Modesto Ricketts into the world on April 12, 2008. Bobby is completing his last year of medical school at Michigan State College of Osteopathic Medicine and will be applying to family practice residencies in the fall. Amanda continues to work as a school social worker in Hartland, Mich. She was recently promoted to director of student services for her school. She coordinates the Teacher Support Team and the Special Education Department. Email abricketts@yahoo.com
Sara Wiener ’03 completed her thesis for her MSW at Smith College (Northampton, Mass.). Her research explored why many high achieving undergraduate college women feel like fakes or frauds in academia. "I have lived and breathed this thing for an entire year--actually, exactly a year. I turned it in at 12:30, when my two closest friends in the program got out of class. They accompanied me to the office to turn it in, and I made them take pictures of the whole process. It was both ridiculous and amazingly fun. It sort of sounds like a birth story, like "mother and baby are doing fine." It sort of felt that way. I have no job plans--yet. Need to get one. Not sure where. Not sure with what population in what setting. I am finding myself eager to go for my PhD much sooner than I anticipated. My thesis adviser and I are planning to tweak my thesis for publication as a journal article, and I am also thinking about joining her research efforts on self-injury among non-clinical female populations. Self-injury has been an interest of mine for a while, so partnering with her seems like a perfect fit. We'll see. I think the library and I need to separate for a while and see other people. It'll just be trial separation though."
Kelly (Karakashian) Callan ’04 is a brake systems product engineer at Chrysler. She completed her mechanical engineering degree at Lawrence Technical University in May 2007. In November she married Dikran Callan. "We went to the same Armenian church growing up," wrote Kelly, "and our parents knew each other long before we were born. Oddly enough, we met (probably spoke to each other for the first time) on a volunteer trip to Armenia in 2000. Then we started dating a short time after that trip. We were married in the same church where both sets of parents were married in 1977, within a few weeks of each other and 30 years before our wedding. They were pretty happy about the whole thing; they probably couldn't have arranged it better if they had tried to arrange it!" Kelly and Dikran live in the Detroit area. Kelly also has resumed graduate school, this time working to earn an MBA at Lawrence Tech.
Ali (Beauvais) Carris ’04 and Nathan Carris were married on August 16, 2008, in Chicago. They live in Chicago and Ali attends the Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Pictured are fellow 2004 grads who attended her wedding (l-r): Carly (Higgins) Davis, Ali, Jessie Wagner, and Cortney Rhadigan.
Marla Hahn ’04 and David Poytinger '04 are engaged to be married. David proposed to Marla in the Kalamazoo College President's Garden, and she happily said yes. "He couldn't have picked a more special, beautiful place to ask me to marry him," Marla said.
Michelle Harburg ’04 is a member of DC Velo, a competitive cycling team in Washington, D.C. A fellow member is Washington, D.C. Mayor Adrian M. Fenty. They occasionally bike together. The Mayor is a triathlete who keeps a demanding workout regimen, about which an article appeared in the online version of the Washington Post. Michelle was included in the photo and copy.
Jill (Sakalove) Ortiz ’04 married Jay Ortiz on May 31, 2008. They live in Norwalk, Conn. Jill is completing her last few semesters at the University of Connecticut's part-time MBA program. She works as a senior financial analyst for SL Green Realty Company in New York City. The photo shows her flanked by her Kalamazoo College roommates and softball teammates--Deanna Werner (left) and Nena Wendzel. They were bridesmaids in her wedding. Email jillortiz21@yahoo.com
Deanna Werner ’04 completed her master's degree in recreation and sports management at the University of Arkansas in May. And two months after that she was hired by Texas A&M as an assistant media relations director! She is responsible for publicity and media relations for A&M's nationally-ranked soccer and softball programs. While she was working on her master's degree she also served as a graduate assistant in the Arkansas women's media relations department, working primarily with softball and swimming. Her 2008 swimming media guide was named third best in the nation by the College Sports Information Directors of America. She also created the first NCAA Women's College World Series blog at the 2007 championship. Email deannawerner@yahoo.com
Shelby Butler ’05 , a Peace Corps Volunteer, wrote, "After two years teaching sixth-grade English in Madagascar, I have signed up for a third year. I will be teaching adult English classes and leading teacher trainings for the next year in Antsirabe, Madagascar. Visitors are welcome! Email shelbyrene@gmail.com
Caitlin Cornell ’05 is pursuing a master's degree in applied linguistics/TESOL at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Email Caitlin.N.Cornell@gmail.com
Allison Schrecengost ’05 has updated her contact information: 1360 W. Isabella Ave., #2057, Mesa, AZ 85202. Email alasun@gmail.com
Shanna Barkume ’06 currently works in the research and development group of UOP, a petrochemical company. She is diligently pursuing a career in education. Email s.barkume@gmail.com
Mary Brown ’06 has been named assistant women's basketball coach at Kentucky Wesleyan College. For the past two seasons she's been graduate assistant women's basketball coach at Chadron State College in Chadron, Nebraska. Brown was a two-time All-MIAA selection when she played for the Hornets. She is the 12th leading scorer in Hornet seasons for the three seasons she played here, averaging 11.5 points, 6.3 rebounds, and 3.8 assists, and 2 steals per game.
Laura Kennedy ’06 is a Fulbright scholar teaching conversational English in Pohang, South Korea. She will be there for the next two years. Email laurakennedy1984@msn.com
Laura Lux-Wells ’06 married classmate Trevor Maher on September 5, 2008, on the porch of Laura's childhood home in Ann Arbor. The event turned into a neighborhood celebration that was covered in a story that appeared in the Ann Arbor News.
David Baxter ’07 graduated from the Master in Professional Accounting (MPA) Program at the University of Texas at Austin last month. He was selected by fellow MPA classmates for the 2008 Outstanding MPA Student Award. The award recognizes an MPA student for outstanding contributions to student life and class unity through demonstrations of personal character, class spirit, and campus leadership. Turns out that David continues a tradition established by Michael Ruprich '06. Michael graduated from the MPA program in August 2007, and he was selected for the Outstanding MPA Student Award that year!
Kim Juwong ’07 has returned to her study abroad roots. She teaches English at a Montessori School in Beijing, China. "It feels good to be back," she wrote. "Everything in Beijing was constantly changing when I was here in 2005, so I expected to come back to a completely different city, and that I did. There are so many new buildings--apartments, shopping centers, bars, and restaurants--and many of my favorite places no longer exist. The city is much greener; there are trees and flowers everywhere, but there are no street vendors anywhere. I desperately hope that street vendors reappear once all the Olympics stuff is over. It almost doesn't feel like China. It feels like I'm in a large U.S. city with lots of Chinese people around.
Karman (Hamlin) Kent ’07 and her husband, Caleb Kent, celebrated their first anniversary on July 7 and bought their first house. Caleb has begun his second year in the University of North Carolina's inorganic chemistry Ph.D. program, and Karman continues to work with the Emily Krzyzewski Center, an after-school program for economically disadvantaged youth. Their new address is 3124 S. Alston Avenue, Durham, NC 27713. Email karman.kent@yahoo.com
Mollie McCurdy ’07 is a Peace Corps Volunteer in Questelles, St. Vincent. She teaches literacy to young children, and she recently was the subject of a feature in her hometown (Cadillac, Mich.) newspaper.
Josh Curry ’08 graduated in June and spent the summer working for the Guilds Initiative on campus. More recently he launched a "road trip" to visit "as many friends of mine as possible in the United States and Canada. I am starting to realize that as we become a more capable society, where most are able to realize their dreams, we start to lose patience. Sure, I want things now, but I don't want to look back on my life and say 'I got what I wanted, but I missed out on so much more.'"
Kathy Drew ’08 married Joe Zynda on June 21, 2008. Several "K" graduates attended the wedding. Pictured are (l-r): Elizabeth Lamphier '08, Elena Brooks '08, Gwen Persons '08, Kathy and Joe, Chrissy Widmayer '08, Stephanie Hogue '02, and John Hogue '03.
Ryan Ouillette ’08 graduated on June 15, 2008. He will attend Wayne State University Medical school starting in the fall. Email ryan.ouillette@gmail.com
Rachel Udow ’08 and her classmate, Marlene Ramos, received a grant from the Kalamazoo Community Foundation to assist with the Farmworker Legal Services pesticide action campaign. Rachel and Marlene work for FLS in Bangor, Michigan. The pesticide action campaign, which they designed and was adopted by the State of Michigan, educates farm workers about pesticide exposure in order to minimize such exposure.
Sakhi Vyas ’08 returned to Ahmedabad, India, (where she completed an internship) to work for the non-governmental organization SEWA. "SEWA stands for Self-Employed Women's Association and was founded 30 years ago to empower rural women who work in the informal sector," Sakhi wrote. "On average, women in developing countries work longer days than men for significantly less pay (if any at all). Women are primarily responsible for gathering fuel and water, caring for children and the elderly, buying and processing food, preparing and serving meals, doing laundry, nursing the sick, and generally managing the household. On top of this, the rural women are midwives, tailors, bidi (cigarette) rollers, and construction workers. They work as farmers and in textiles and handicrafts. However, their informal work is not considered real in the sense of a job, for which they can earn liquid wages. SEWA was founded to help these women. They are taught to value their work as a service which requires compensation. SEWA has blossomed to include a radio station, an academy (where I worked during my internship), a bank, and now a trade facilitation center (STFC). STFC was formed to unite the textile and handicraft workers to create fair uniform prices for the products and to allow for growth and increased training in the crafts. I do marketing for STFC to create international alliances."

Back to Front Page

Friends

Allen Buskirk died on July 18, 2008. He was a physics professor at Kalamazoo College from 1953 to 1978. Allen was born in Bloomington, Indiana, on April 11, 1923. He served as a Captain in the U.S. Army during World War II in the Pacific theater. He completed his Ph.D. in nuclear physics at Indiana University and began teaching at Kalamazoo College in 1953. He chaired the Department of Physics here from 1962 to 1976. In 1964 he was named the John Hornbeck Chair of Physics, and endowed position. Many of his students went on to complete graduate degrees, a tribute to the effectiveness of his challenging hands-on approach to experimental science. In later years, he assisted in the development of science education programs for teachers in training at Western Michigan University. He was an avid sailor and enthusiastic explorer of the Great Lakes. Memorials may be made to the First Presbyterian Church Capital Campaign, American Cancer Society, or Hospice Care of Southwest Michigan.
Jean Collin , professor emeritus at the University of Caen, passed away in late July of an extended illness. He was 82. Monsieur Collin was known to generations of Kalamazoo students who studied in Caen as a dynamic and demanding teacher of French language and culture in what was referred to by students as the "strangers' course." He was associated with the Kalamazoo College foreign study from its earliest days as a summer program. In addition to his teaching, he held a variety of other positions at the university over the years. A man of many interests and talents, he was equally adept at constructing a traditional bake over in the garden of his country house in Maizet, composing Latin citations for the university, and making his own Norman cider. He was a proud Norman and a walking encyclopedia of Norman history, culture, cuisine, and traditions. A human skull, which he always claimed was that of one of his Viking ancestors, occupied a prominent place in his office. In addition to his numerous shorter talks and papers, he was the author of two books, one on the history of the University of Caen and the other on his home commune of Venoix. Jean Collin was one of those unforgettable people who contributed greatly to the success of the Kalamazoo program in Caen. We esteemed his friendship and will recall with pleasure the many enjoyable times we spent together.
Ruth Collins , retired registrar from Kalamazoo College, was named a Melvin Jones Fellow by the Kalamazoo Downtown Lions Club. The award is the highest honor on the international organization and recognizes Collins' commitment to serving the world community and to humanitarian service.
Ronda Stryker , Kalamazoo College board of trustee member, recently received the Russel G. Mawby Award for Philanthropy from Governor Jennifer Granholm at the 2008 Governor's Service Awards event held in Detroit. She shares the award with her husband, William Johnston, president and chair of Greenleaf Companies, and a member of the Western Michigan University board of trustees. Stryker and Johnston were recognized for "demonstrating a lifelong commitment to encouraging private action for public good," according to the award criteria.

Back to Front Page

In Memory

Back to Front Page

1930's

Rose (Zlatkin) Meyerovitz ’30 died on April 18, 2008.
Betty (Sutherland) Race ’30 died on April 1, 2008.
Margaret (Lawler) Machin ’32 died on August 31, 2008. She graduated with a degree in political science and was active in several extracurricular activities, including the Eurodelphian Society, the International Relations Club, the Spanish Club, and the Social Sciences Club. She went on to earn a LL.B. (bachelor of laws) degree from the University of Detroit.
Charles Blagdon ’33 died on April 10, 2008. He came to Kalamazoo College from Jackson, Mich., and majored in English. He was a member of Century Forum and the Drama Club.
Stephen Beach ’36 died on February 15, 2008. He earned his B.A. in political science at "K" and his law degree from the University of Detroit Mercy. He worked as an attorney and specialized in corporate and intellectual property law.
Clara (Orvis) Butow ’36 died on July 14, 2008. She attended Northwestern University as well as Kalamazoo College and worked for Butow Organic Vineyards.
Paul Kreilick ’36 died on August 7, 2008. He earned his degree from Kalamazoo College in psychology.
Virginia (Pierson) Kirk ’37 died on April 6, 2008. After graduating from "K" she did graduate work at Michigan State University. She worked for the Tuscola (Mich.) County government.
John Lambooy ’37 died on August 12, 2008. Lambooy was captain of the Hornet Track team and a member of the Sherwood Society, the Science Club, and "K" Club. He earned his degree in chemistry and his Ph.D. in that subject from the University of Rochester. He was a professor at the University of Maryland. Lambooy married Irene (Flattery) Lambooy '42, who survives, and the couple enjoyed nearly 66 years of marriage. They had four children, three of whom survive (one son, a combat medic, was killed in the Vietnam War). Also surviving are 10 grandchildren and three great grandchildren.
Alan Sidnam ’37 died on August 26, 2008. He grew up in Kalamazoo and was a member of the Upjohn family. He earned his degree in economics. During World War II Sidnam was a fighter pilot in the South Pacific and once flew as Charles Lindberg's wingman. He worked as an advertising executive for Benton & Bowles and later for Ogilvy & Mather, both Manhattan firms. He then entered the world of venture capital and in that role raised money for and invested in many existing companies and start-up businesses. Those included Lindblad Travel, one of the first companies to offer expeditions to venues like the Antarctic and the Galapagos Islands; V-Band Corporation, a specialty telecommunications equipment company; National Demographics and Lifestyles, a database of buyers for use by direct marketing companies; Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics, the renowned speed-reading program; and All American Sports, which operated tennis camps. Sidnam assisted with Norman Cousins' purchase of the Saturday Review, saving that magazine from bankruptcy. He served on the Kalamazoo College board of trustees from 1971 to 1982.
Anne (Draper) Harger ’38 died on January 26, 2008. She earned her degree in French, and she was very active in extracurricular activities. She served as secretary-treasurer of the Student Senate and of the Senior Class. She was vice president of Kappa Pi, and she was a member of the Drama Club and the Women's League Council.
Harriet (Potts) McIntosh ’39 died on June 21, 2008. She came to Kalamazoo College from Dowagiac, Mich. She was an only child who had developed a deep love of books and reading from her parents. "The library is the lodge pole in the tent of my life," she often said, and it's not surprising that she earned her B.A. at Kalamazoo College in English. She worked for awhile as director of publications at Jokake Press and then became a self-employed writer. Her work appeared in several national publications, including Mademoiselle, Saturday Evening Post, Harper's, and the New York Times. In 1947 she and her family moved to Arizona. She founded the Friends of he Phoenix Library and served as that organization's first president.
Betty (McLay) White ’39 died on March 29, 2008.

Back to Front Page

1940's

Anne Godfrey ’41 died on June 13, 2008. After graduating from Kalamazoo College she continued her education at the University of Chicago. She worked for Case Western Reserve.
Robert Maunder ’41 died on April 5, 2008. He earned his B.A. in English and went on to complete a Master's degree in that subject at Syracuse University after military service in World War II. While at "K" he served as editor of the Boiling Pot and was a member of Century Forum. He had a long and successful career as a teacher and school administrator, starting in the Lansing (Mich.) Public Schools and then moving to Vacaville, Calif., in the late 1960s. He met his wife, Margaret McCrimmon '41, at "K." They had eight children, two of whom also attended Kalamazoo College--Richard Maunder '71 and Steve Maunder '73.
John Montgomery ’41 died on April 3, 2008. He earned his B.A. in political science at "K" and a Ph.D. from Harvard University, where he worked since 1963 as the Ford Foundation Professor of International Studies. He was Harvard's first full-time professor of public administration. He also directed the Pacific Basin Research Center of Soka University of America. At "K" he was president of Pi Kappa Delta and president of the International Relations Club. He directed the radio station and was a member of the Debate Club. After he graduation he served in the U.S. Army. During World War II, following the atomic bombing of Hiroshima in 1945, Lieutenant Montgomery was the U.S. military advisor to the official commission planning the city's reconstruction. One of his suggestions was the establishment of an institute of peace to accompany a planned museum. The museum came to fruition quickly, and the institute was eventually created in 1998. Montgomery received the inaugural Hiroshima Peace Award from the city of Hiroshima in November 1999. He traveled to Hiroshima to accept the award, and on that occasion said, "There is still in all our minds, of course, the memory of the rubble-strewn surface of the earth that mid-August.... But for me the stronger image now is the courage I encountered in the midst of despair, the willingness to think of a distant future that would be brighter and richer than the militaristic past." Montgomery served as an advisor to a variety of international development programs, work that took him to some 80 countries. He was a consultant for many agencies and foundations, including the Agency for International Development, the World Bank, the Department of Agriculture, the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations, UNESCO, and more. He wrote 15 books and monographs and more than 80 articles and chapters. He received an honorary doctor of laws degree from Kalamazoo College in 1962 and a Distinguished Achievement Award in 1988.
Howard Haman (Jr.) ’42 died on May 26, 2008. He earned his degree in economics and served as deputy director of personnel for the State of New Hampshire. At "K" Haman was a member of Century Forum. He also served as president of the senior class, business manager of Index, and manager of music.
Ellen (Hotelling) Hough ’42 died on July 31, 2008. Among the many highlights of her long business career was being named the first female president of the Credit Managers' Association in Kalamazoo. According to her daughter, Jennifer (Smith) Sanderson '66, Ellen was extremely proud of her time at Kalamazoo. "You can't imagine how it peppered our growing-up years," wrote Jennifer. "Mother's memories of Drs. Diebold and Watts, Trowbridge stories, and thoughts of being chosen Queen of the May Fete were primary in our consciousness. I'm sure my decision to enroll at 'K' was predicated on Easter photos taken in front of Stetson Chapel, winter basketball games, and the tennis tournaments. The foreign study program was icing on the cake." Hough's family members who attended Kalamazoo are: Robert Hotelling '38 (brother), Frances (Ring) Hotelling '39 (sister-in-law), William Sanderson '67 (son-in-law), Amy (Hotelling) Leblanc '70 (niece), Edie (Smith) Trent '71 (daughter), and Peter Sanderson '97 (grandson).
Donald O'Toole ’42 died on August 2, 2008. He earned his B.A. in economics and went on to earn a J.D. from University of Michigan. O'Toole was a member of the Sherwood Society and the International Relations Club. He was an ardent golfer.
Hugh Anderson ’43 died July 5, 2008. He graduated from "K" cum laude with a degree in chemistry, and then earned a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from University of Illinois in 1949. He had a 36-year career in research and management at the Upjohn Company and was active in many volunteer endeavors, including having served on the State Board of the ACLU of Michigan and as chairman of the 1980 United Way Campaign of Greater Kalamazoo. He was also very pleased to be a founding shareholder of Bell's Beer in Kalamazoo. Hugh served on the Kalamazoo College Board of Trustees from 1977 to 1986, when he was named Trustee Emeritus. He also served as 1943 Class Agent, Alumni Trustee (1960-63), Director of the Alumni Division of the Annual Fund Drive (1975), President of the Alumni Association, and Annual Fund Campaign Chair (1982). He received the Alumni Association Service Award (1976) and was a member of the 1833 Society. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Jaccie (Bowen) Anderson '46, and daughter Sarah and her husband John Bell of Cabin John, Md.
Carol (Rottier) Banzhaf ’46 died on August 24, 2008. She graduated with degrees in both English literature and psychology. Her life was often a triumph over adversity. She was hit by a car at the age of six, which left her with a handicap that she gracefully transformed into a signature posture. She was abandoned by her first husband, a veteran whose survival of the D-Day invasion left him with severe psychological trauma. Nevertheless, she earned a master's degree in guidance and counseling (Stetson University, Florida) as a single working mother of two daughters. In 1955 she opened the St. James Episcopal Day School (Ormond Beach, Fla.) with five students. The school continues as a K-8 institution to this day. In 1960 she moved to Wisconsin to serve as Dean of Women at the University School of Milwaukee. She married Henry Banzhaf in 1966. They enjoyed a rural retirement in Wisconsin punctuated by frequent travel throughout the world.
Margaret (Bebout) Hymans ’46 died on May 9, 2008. She earned her degree in biology. At "K" she served as social chairperson of the student body and vice president of Alpha Sigma Delta. She also was a member of the Pan-American Club and the Women's Athletic Association.
Jack Hart ’49 died on November 2, 2006. He earned his degree in political science and economics.
Caroll Honess ’49 died on August 18, 2008. At "K" he was a member of Century Forum and played on the basketball, track, and cross-country teams. He graduated with a degree in history and sociology. Honess was a retired special agent of the U.S. Secret Service.

Back to Front Page

1950's

Ralph Beebe ’50 died on June 11, 2007. He was raised in Kalamazoo and earned his B.A. from Kalamazoo College in economics.
William Clark ’51 died on October 26, 2007. He majored in economics and political science at "K" and then earned an M.B.A. from Western Michigan University. He worked for James River Corporation before founding his own company, Freedom Financial Systems. At "K" he was very active in extracurricular activities. He was the business manager for Boiling Pot and a member of the Economics Club, Sherwood Society, Spanish Club, Philo Glee Club, and College Singers.
Richard Windisch ’51 died on May 20, 2008. He came to Kalamazoo College from Scarsdale, N.Y., and he earned his B.A. in English.
William Watson ’52 died on April 4, 2008.
Lloyd Fowler ’53 died on March 7, 2008. He earned his B.A. in sociology and, after graduation, worked at Fidelity Savings Bank.
Torsten Edvar ’54 died on November 2, 2005. He earned his degree in religion and went on to earn a B.D. at Crosier Seminary. He was the director of Krislund Camp and Conference Center.
Eric Gittings ’54 died on January 12, 2008.
James McFadden ’54 died on June 29, 2008. He was the owner of James McFadden Insurance. The economics major was very active in extracurricular activities at "K." He was president of the Economics Club; vice president of Phi Lambda and the senior class; treasurer of Student Senate, Joint House Council, and the junior class, and member of the College's Religious Affairs Committee.
Bruce Van Domelen ’55 died on September 18, 2007. He earned his B.A. in physics. During his years at "K" he was president of the sophomore class and of the Circle K Club. He was a member of Phi Kappa Alpha, Phi Lambda, Men's Union, Joint-House Council, the Index, WJMD, and the German Club. He also played intramural sports. He served as Manager of Technology Transfer for Sandia National Labs.
Marilyn (Draper) Thompson ’56 died on August 29, 2008.
Nicole Boutry ’59 died on May 10, 2008, in Chartres, France. She attended Kalamazoo College for a year as a Fulbright Scholar, graduating with the Class of 1959. She was retired from Air France where she was one of two flight attendants logging more than 1,000 hours on the Concorde aircraft. While at Kalamazoo College she became a lifelong friend of the Machin family--Harold Machin '31; his wife, Margaret (Lawler) Machin '32, and their daughter, Katherine (Machin) Howson '62. Nicole's son, Eric Francois Boutry, is married to Katherine's daughter, Beth Ann Howson Boutry.
Philip Halsey ’59 died on June 14, 2008. He majored in economics and during his undergraduate years was a participant in the College's Republican Model Convention. He worked as a banker for Aries Trust and then formed and served as president of his own company, Jericho Rental and Sales.

Back to Front Page

1960's

Jonathan Ford ’62 died on June 5, 2008. He came to Kalamazoo College from Benton Harbor, Mich. He majored in chemistry and studied abroad in Bonn, Germany, with one of the first groups of Kalamazoo College students to study abroad.
Robert Tardiff ’63 died on July 16, 2008. He earned his B.A. in physics at "K" and later earned an M.B.A. from Western Michigan University. He was an accounts manager for the Simpson Plainwell Paper Company.

Back to Front Page

Friends

Kurt Kaufman , professor of chemistry at Kalamazoo College from 1956 to 1980, died on July 1, 2008. He grew up in Indianapolis, Indiana and earned a B.A. from Wabash College, a Master's from Harvard University, and a D.Phil in organic chemistry from Oxford University. He held over 10 patents for drugs developed from his work with the psoralens, organic compounds found in the skin and he also conducted research at Kalsec, a spice extraction company in Kalamazoo, Michigan. But his great passion was teaching, and both colleagues and students considered him a truly gifted communicator and leader. His friend and colleague, Larry Barrett, once described Kurt as that rarest of teachers, one who encouraged and then listened to the questions that "have been trained out of most of us," the kind of question that "drives down under the commonly held assumptions." Dr. Kaufman was happiest when he was teaching, and he mentored hundreds of future chemists and thinkers. He was an avid tennis player, actor in the Reader's Theatre, and reveler at the Whistle Stop on Friday afternoons. Dr. is survived by his wife of 37 years, Marilee. He has three daughters, Kristina Vaughan-Towne, Cindi Gilliland, and Meredith Kaufman; five grandchildren; as well as scores of friends. He suffered a debilitating stroke in 1980 that took away his ability to speak, read, and write. Despite this overwhelming disability, he continued to inspire all who knew him by his strength of will and character as well as his incredible sense of humor. Dr. Kaufman spent the last 20 years living in Florida, on Sanibel Island and in Fort Myers, loved and cared for by his wife. He will be deeply missed by many. Any gifts can be made in the form of a donation to: the Kurt Kaufman Fellowship at Kalamazoo College, 1200 Academy St., Kalamazoo, Michigan, 49006 or Hospice at Shell Point in Ft. Myers, Florida, 33908.
Warren I. "Swede" Thomas died on July 15, 2008. Swede served Kalamazoo College in numerous capacities from 1956 to 1980. He was born in Newcastle, Indiana, on December 23, 1917. He graduated from Wittenberg College (Springfield, Ohio), where he excelled as a student and a football player. He later earned a Master's degree from Western Michigan University. It was at Wittenberg that he met the love of his life, Patricia Sims. They wed on July 7, 1943, and were happily married for 64 years. Patricia predeceased her husband on April 8, 2008. Swede was a First Lieutenant in the U.S. Army, and during World War II served as a medic in the European theatre of operations. After the war he began his career in education at Waukegan (Ill.) High School as a teacher and coach (basketball and football). He left Waukegan for Olivet College and worked there for three years before joining Kalamazoo College in 1956. At "K" he was a professor of physical education throughout his career. He also coached cross-country, track, and served as an assistant coach in football and basketball. He was renowned for a cross-country training trip during which team members ran from Sault Saint Marie in Michigan's Upper Peninsula to the Kalamazoo College campus. From 1966 to 1980 he worked in the Career-Service department, serving as its director for the last 12 years of his career at "K". He also was an avid volunteer for the USTA Boys 18 &16 National Championships. In all of these capacities he significantly and positively influenced the lives of countless students and athletes. He is survived by a daughter, Becky Marion, and her husband, Richy, of Fort Myers, Florida; a son, Peter Thomas, and his partner, Joan, of Boekelia, Florida, and a granddaughter, Karrie Thomas, of Holland, Michigan. Swede will be missed by many people. The family suggests that memorial gifts be made to the Kalamazoo College Athletic Fund at Kalamazoo College, 1200 Academy Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Back to Front Page

Send in a Class Note

Name:
Email:
Class Year:
Note:
Photo: (2 MB maximum!)
These characters: IMAGE