January 2014

CLASS NOTES

1940's | 1950's | 1960's | 1970's | 1980's | 1990's | 2000's | Friends | In Memory

1960's

Jack Robert Staff ’68 recently completed a 2.5 hour ascent of the famed Mickikinick Trail in north Idaho's Selkirk Range. The climb ascends 3,500 feet over 3.5 miles. Staff is a 67-year-old retired econ professor and former Internet CEO. He most recently served as a volunteer chaplain at Bonner General Hospital.

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1970's

David Thoms ’70 has been elected to a three-year term on the board of directors of the Federation of Alliances Francaises-USA, Inc. His term will expire in 2016. He was also elected as the board's vice president for a one-year term. The Federation of Alliances Francaises-USA is a cooperative organization dedicated to the promotion of understanding the French language, literature, history and culture. The national organization supports more than 100 local chapters in the United States. Thoms is a principal at the law firm Miller Canfield. He works in the firm's Troy, Mich., and New York City offices.
Ken Bowers ’71 has filed an e-petition on Change.org for a proposed set of fireside chats that would be delivered by President Obama. The focus of the talks would be sustainability, peace, and equity in standards of living. The idea harkens to the fireside chats made famous by President Franklin Roosevelt.
Anne (Skjaerlund) Fege ’73 continues to lead the San Diego Children and Nature Collaborative. 2013 highlights for the organization include four workshops on schoolyard habitats; a grant for K-6 lessons that feature nature experiences in schoolyards; work with various nature education partners to prepare for the Next Generation Science Standards; launch of a San Diego Citizen Science Network; and new status as a program under the San Diego Science Alliance. Anne chairs (as a volunteer) the City of San Diego's Community Forest Advisory Board, and she is working with others to establish a nonprofit "tree foundation" to engage public support for valuing, planting, and caring for urban trees.
Rand Baldwin ’76 was recently named executive director of the Aluminum Anodizing Council. He also is president of the Aluminum Extruders Council, a trade organization formed to promote the use of aluminum extrusion in various industries. Baldwin is a 32-year veteran of business management and has served as chief staff executive for not-for-profit associations for the last 22 years. He and his wife Joyce have four children: Matt, Katie, Lucas and Sarah, three of whom are now in college. Baldwin's favorite hobby is travel, especially by car. "Just hop in and off we go, no itinerary or plan. It's fun!"
Gregory Gamalski ’77 has been awarded an AV Preeminent Rating by Martindale-Hubbell. The Martindale-Hubbell Peer Review Ratings are an objective indicator of a lawyer's high ethical standards and professional ability, generated from evaluations of lawyers by other members of the bar and the judiciary in the United States and Canada. Gamalski is a partner in the business practice group of the law firm Giarmarco, Mullins & Horton, P.C (Troy. Mich.).
Michael Klaeren ’77 is now chief judge of the Jackson County (Mich.) District Court. Chief judges serve two-year terms and are responsible for overseeing courts' internal operations, finances, case management, work assignments, and more. Klaeren, who was appointed to the court in 2007 by former Governor Jennifer Granholm, earned his law degree from the University of Toledo in 1980. Before he became a judge, he was a partner in a Jackson firm and specialized in workers' compensation defense. As a judge, he heads the Jackson County Mental Health Court, which aims to improve public safety, reduce recidivism, and enhance the quality of life among mentally ill defendants.
Si Johnson ’78 has been selected chairperson of the Kalamazoo Community Foundation Board of Trustees. Johnson is a retired Stryker Corporation executive who has served on the KCF board since 2011. Johnson also is a member of the Kalamazoo College board of trustees.
Tom Wilkinson ’78 is director of business development for the design, construction, and development firm of Cunningham-Limp. He initiated the firm's business relationship with Canyon-Agassi, and that relationship evolved into Cunningham-Limp building Canyon-Agassi's Southwest Detroit Lighthouse Charter Academy. At the groundbreaking ceremony on September 16 Wilkinson met tennis great Andre Agassi, who once played at K's Stowe Stadium during the USTA Boy's National Tennis Championships. And the K connections just kept coming! Tom wrote, "Although Canyon-Agassi owns the school now, it will transfer to Lighthouse Academy in a few years. The Regional Vice President of Lighthouse is Anne LaTarte, a K graduate, Class of 2003. Any Michigan-based Lighthouse principals report to her, or will in the future. Anne and I have also developed a terrific relationship. I put two and two together recently at a lunch meeting. As it turns out, she was in the Frelon Dance Company in 2003, the same year our daughter (Courtney Wilkinson, Class of 2006) participated as a freshman. Amazing K coincidences!"

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1980's

Danny Agustin Flores ’80 was included in the Marquis Who's Who in the World 2014. The American-based publication highlights notable people and their career accomplishments in their respective fields. Flores is a biotechnologist and life sciences writer with expertise in animal biotechnology and food and health research.
Mary Burke ’83 has put her German studies major to good use by translating into English a book originally published in German. The book is titled A History of Screen Printing: How an Art Evolved into an Industry (by Guido Lengwiler, ST Media Group, November 2013). The German version was published by Niggli Verlag in Switzerland, a press that specializes in architecture, design, and typography. Mary did her study abroad in Bonn, Germany.
Ven Johnson ’83 founded his own firm, Johnson Law, in 2011. Since its founding the Detroit firm has grown from one (Ven) to 11 attorneys and 12 support staff. And, more recently, Johnson announced plans to expand the firm further with the opening of an office in Grand Rapids. The Grand Rapids office will have capacity for 15 employees.
Shelley (Glenn) Prebenda ’83 was lucky to capture a few moments with college roommate Taina (Lowe) Williams (left) on a beach in Jamaica last April. Taina has taught and inspired students (young and old) in English, French, and Spanish for many years on her native island. She currently teaches English in Kingston. Sadly, Taina lost her husband, Terry, last July after a difficult battle with cancer. She has two beautiful teenage daughters, Ria and Asha. Shelley recently relocated with her family to Rhode Island. She is the mother of six kids (only two left at home). Reluctantly, Shelley left her New Jersey law practice a year ago, but she recently took the Rhode Island bar exam and hopes to pursue new law-related endeavors in her new home state.
Suzanne (Kleinsmith) Saganich ’83 has been named a 2014 Ohio Super Lawyer by Ohio Super Lawyers Magazine. Saganich is a partner at Roetzel & Andress, L.P.A., in Cleveland, Ohio.
Sherri Yezbick-Taylor ’84 has changed her vocation. The former double major (art and biology) owns and operates Sherri Yezbick-Taylor Photography in Hartland, Mich. She also shares daily photos and thoughts on her blog, Captured Thoughts for the Day. It's a site worth a visit.
Rick James ’85 holds a new position as the enterprise risk officer in First National Bank's Howell, Mich., headquarters. James is a second-generation banker, coming to First National from Capitol Bancorp, where his responsibilities most recently included enterprise risk management, asset liability management, and corporate finance. James earned his M.B.A. from Michigan State University.
Dawn Schluter ’86 has been appointed chair of Women of Miller Canfield, the law firm's internal committee of women lawyers. Schulter is a principal in the firm's Troy, Mich., office and leader of the personal services group. Women of Miller Canfield is committed to helping Miller Canfield attract, retain, develop, and advance women lawyers through strengthened internal professional relationships, education, strategic business networking, practice development initiatives, and leadership development. In 2012, women made up about 31 percent of all lawyers in the U.S., according to Catalyst Quick Take: Women in Law in the U.S.. In law firms throughout the country and particularly at the largest law firms in the U.S., women are significantly underrepresented, and this under-representation is particularly noticeable at both the partnership level and in the leadership ranks.
Bridget (Sullivan) Jennings ’88 and her husband Bob have purchased Swim Gear of North Carolina, a retail business located in Clemmons, North Carolina, specializing in swimwear. Bridget and Bob have four children, all of whom swim competitively, so they were longtime customers of the store when its former owner, about to retire, approached them about the transition. The couple has made a few changes, opening up more floor space for merchandise and adding a new dressing room. Future plans call for expansion and strengthening the store's online shopping option. Most of the store's business is with local swim teams--high school and college--as well as with swimming organizations, and the couple is expanding those connections to other groups, like retirement homes, interested in aquatic fitness. The Winston-Salem Journal published an article about the new venture.
Amy (Conrad) Stokes ’88 was on campus during Homecoming 2013 to celebrate her 45th class reunion. She had the opportunity to catch up with Professor Emeritus of Mathematics T.J. Smith (on campus to see former students). Smith and Stokes talked a great deal about bell ringing, a subject dear to both. It was only after their meeting that Smith learned much more about his former student, specifically that Stokes is the founder and director of a distance mentoring program for African teenagers. That program is called Infinite Family and has attracted a great deal of attention. In fact, in 2011 Stokes was named a Top Ten CNN Hero. "I wish we had talked more about her work with Infinite Family," said Smith. Thanks to the heads-up from Smith, LuxEsto will follow up on that wish.

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1990's

Jeneen Wiche ’91 is a syndicated farm and garden columnist whose work appears in more than a dozen newspapers. She was named the winner of Kentucky Farm Bureau's 2013 Communications Award. The award, which consists of a plaque and a $300 cash prize, has been presented by KFB annually since 1960. Media outlets, county Farm Bureaus, and other agriculture-related agencies nominate candidates whose outstanding journalism has created a better understanding of Kentucky's agricultural industry during the past year. Shelby County Farm Bureau nominated Wiche. She owns a 20-acre farm and appears regularly on TV and radio. She also lectures part-time at the University of Louisville and teaches a course titled "Food and Body Politic."
Matt Brynildson ’93 is brewmaster of Firestone Walker Brewing Company (Paso Robles, Calif.) He was Eccentric Ale guest brewer at Bell's Brewing annual Eccentric Day party in Kalamazoo. Brynildson was a home brewer who worked at KALSEC Inc. in Kalamazoo under former Stroh's head brewmaster Rudy Held. Brynildson also formerly brewed at Goose Island Brewing Company in Chicago and SLO Brewing Company in California.
Ryan Perry ’93 has been awarded an AV Preeminent Rating by Martindale-Hubbell. The Martindale-Hubbell Peer Review Ratings are an objective indicator of a lawyer's high ethical standards and professional ability, generated from evaluations of lawyers by other members of the bar and the judiciary in the United States and Canada. Perry is a shareholder in the law firm Giarmarco, Mullins & Horton, P.C. (Troy, Mich.). His area of specialization is commercial litigation and business and employment law.
Laura (Edwardson) Lam ’99 has been appointed director of community planning and development for the City of Kalamazoo. She was formerly deputy director. Lam has a master's degree in public administration from San Jose State University. She has worked in community revitalization and with neighborhoods in Chicago and San Jose, Calif. She returned to Kalamazoo in 2009 as the city's community development manager.
Natalie Shepherd ’99 anchors the 6 P.M. and 10 P.M. newscasts at WWL-TV in New Orleans. She joins that station from WFLA, the NBC affiliate in Tampa, Fla., where she was a TV anchor and reporter. She earned her bachelor's degree in English and a master's degree in broadcast journalism (Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University). She worked at several stations in Michigan before taking the position in Tampa.

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2000's

LaNesha (McCoy) DeBardelaben ’02 earned a $500 Love of Learning Award from Phi Kappa Phi, one of only 147 given nationally in 2013 by the nation's oldest, largest, and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines. She is director of archives and libraries at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit. After earning her B.A. in history from K, she earned her M.A. in history and her graduate certification in museum studies from University of Missouri-St. Louis. She also earned her M.L.S. degree in archives and records management at Indiana University (Bloomington). Currently, she is a Ph.D. candidate in history at Michigan State University.
Shea Hogan (M.D.) ’02 has joined Bronson Advanced Cardiac Healthcare in Kalamazoo. Hogan received her medical degree from the University of Michigan Medical School and completed her internal medicine residency and her general cardiology and internal medicine fellowships at the university. She specializes in interventional cardiology, cardiovascular disease in women, and peripheral vascular disease.
Sara (Church) Nicholson ’02 and her husband, Rob, welcomed to the world their daughter, Cora Robin, on June 27, 2013. She weighed eight pounds, six ounces and measured 21.25 inches. Sara and Rob are delighted!
Erica Bills ’04 has been named director of development for the Burcham Hills Foundation, the fund-raising arm of the East Lansing-based retirement community. Erica was former executive director of the Muscular Dystrophy Association's South Central Michigan region, overseeing fund-raising activities in 28 counties. She chairs the Jackson (Mich.) Symphony Holiday Ball Committee, serves in the Jackson Symphony Guild, the Kalamazoo College Guilds, and the United Way's Teen Pregnancy Prevention Coalition. She also coaches youth soccer. Erica earned a master's of public administration degree from Arizona State University.
Eli Savit ’05 once played on the Hornets basketball court, but recently he earned a place on the Supreme Court--as clerk for retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. Beginning in July, he will work with O'Connor and with one of the active justices (which active justice will be determined this spring). Clerks in these positions typically work for one retired and one active justice. Savit's responsibilities include determining which cases are heard by the high court, helping the justice to prepare for oral argument, and writing the first draft of the opinions assigned to his justice. A justice may write up to 15 opinions per term. Savit is a 2010 University of Michigan Law School graduate, and he has clerked for two Court of Appeals judges--Judge Carlos Bea of the Ninth Circuit and Judge David Tatel of the D.C. Circuit. He worked for Williams & Connolly in Washington and spent two years in the Bronx working for Teach for America. He is especially excited about helping Justice O'Connor promote civics education, one of her top priorities since retirement from the Supreme Court.
Elizabeth Garlow ’07 is executive director of Michigan Corps. She has introduced a microfinance and entrepreneur building program called KIVA Michigan that has been adopted in Detroit and Flint and is expanding to other communities. She joined Michigan Corps in May 2012 as director of strategic initiatives and rose to the position of executive director in January 2013. Prior to joining Michigan Corps, Garlow spent four years working to advance domestic microfinance with ACCION USA. There she focused on strategic partnership development and program implementation to grow the country's leading microloan portfolio. She started her career researching efforts in business social responsibility and cooperative movements in Brazil, Argentina, and Italy for the Economy of Communion Initiative.
Maegan Connochie ’09 and Brendan Whelan (photo at left) celebrated their July 14, 2013, wedding in Watervliet, Michigan. Kalamazoo alumni in attendance included Katie Stefl '09, Allison Dejonghe '09, Marc Korn '09, Jim Entwistle '09, Amanda Kanter '09, Daniel Kovacs '09, Katy (Knoechel) Kellogg '10, Barret Mueller '10, Colin Dueweke '10, Kandice Keen '11, Adrienne Fastbinder '11, and Sarah Baumann '12.
Allie Semperger ’09 is a contributing writer for "About-Face," a blog that aims to equip women and girls with tools to understand and resist harmful media messages that affect their self-esteem and body image. One recent article by Allie discusses the merits of a mandatory disclaimer in advertisements that would state that a model has had her body's image manipulated on a computer. Allie is also the creator of the feminist Tumblr blog "Women's Issues Are Society's Issues." Catch up with Allie at her website.

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2010's

Nick Moeller ’10 is the assistant sports information director at the University of Montevallo (Montevallo, Ala.). Moeller served as a sports information assistant at K before joining the Kalamazoo Wings minor league hockey team as a public relations assistant. He earned his B.A. in English at K and completed a master's degree in sports management at Western Michigan University.
Thomas C.M. Turner ’10 joined the law firm of Miller Canfield as an associate. He works at the firm's Detroit office in the financial institutions and transactions group. He earned his bachelor's degree at K in history, and he won the William G. Howard Memorial Prize in Economics. He earned his J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School.
Tova Berg ’11 is one of 69 medical, dental and veterinary students from 32 colleges and universities across the country who will engage in laboratory research for a year as Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Medical Research Fellows. The HHMI program's goal is to develop future physician-scientists and medically trained researchers. Berg earned a degree in chemistry at Kalamazoo College, then went on to the University of Michigan Medical School to work on her medical degree. She will be doing her research at the university, expanding on scientific work she had done for her Senior Individualized Project: "Growth Hormone Regulation of Proto-Oncogenes and Involvement of Mirna Mechanism." At K, Berg received a stipend from K's HHMI undergraduate science education grant to support her SIP work. During her undergraduate years she also pursued interests in psychology, classics, religion, clarinet, and Spanish, and she ran for the Hornet cross-country team. Study abroad took her to Ecuador. The HHMI is a nonprofit medical research organization that ranks as one of the nation's largest philanthropies.
Georgina Sket ’11 married Justin Scott (photo above) on September 14, 2013, in Leland, Mich., at the home of Rob and Jill Butryn and their sons, Danny and David. Rob is 1990 K graduate. Georgina noted the Butryns' "amazing generosity" and cited the wonderful ways in which "K connections transcend class years. The Butryns are good family friends of my husband's family," she added, "but the K connection is fun, too. As alumni, we really are 'at home in the world'--and also sometimes 'at home in each other's homes.'" Pictured are Justin and Georgina, Jill, Danny, Rob, and David.
Katy Sly ’12 recently moved back to her home state of Minnesota after a year of teaching English in French Guiana as a Teaching Assistant Program in France (TAPIF) Fellow. She works as a youth and family advocate at the Harriet Tubman Community Organization in the Twin Cities area.
Emily Guzman ’13 has started a year of full-time service with Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC) Northwest. JVC volunteers are involved in critical social services, including advocating for domestic violence survivors, nursing in community clinics, teaching and tutoring in schools with Native American children, assisting in shelters, and working for food justice issues Throughout their year of service, JVC members focus on four core values: social and ecological justice, simple living, spirituality, and community. Emily is a cafe team operating member at Sisters of the Road Cafe in Portland, Ore., a local nonprofit working to feed and empower those on the margins. She is excited to work in an ever-changing, fast-paced environment, and with an organization that cares about social and ecological justice.
Roy Yewah ’13 is among 33 young adults who were selected from 700 applicants to spend the next two years of their lives living and working in Detroit. Roy is among the "Year Two" class of Challenge Detroit, an organization dedicated to recruiting young talent to the Motor City to work for businesses and nonprofits. Leigh Ann Ulrey '11 and Sam Brennan '11 are part of "Year One" Challenge Detroit.

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In Memory

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1930's

Frieda (Op't Holt) Vogan ’36 died on September 26, 2013. She was 102 years old. Her childhood interest in music developed into an eight-decade career as teacher, performer, and organist-choir director. At age eight, she began piano lessons and added organ studies in her early teens with Henry Overley, professor of music at Kalamazoo College. She graduated from K as a French major. She taught public school briefly and continued with organ studies and concerts. In 1937 she enrolled at the University of Michigan School of Music (Ann Arbor) where she received bachelor's and master's degrees in music, focusing on the organ. Shortly after graduating, she presented a recital in Kalamazoo for a convention for the American Guild of Organists. She met her future husband, Charles Vogan, at that concert. Frieda taught organ and music theory at the University of Michigan for seven years. She performed on the organ in a variety of concert venues. When she and her husband moved to Columbia, Missouri, Frieda taught organ in the music department at Stephens College and served as organist with Columbia's Bach Singers and the University of Missouri's Orchestra and Chorus. The family moved to Norfolk, Va., when Charles Vogan was appointed chairman of the music department at what was to become Old Dominion University. Frieda was actively involved in many areas of Norfolk's musical life. She taught organ at Old Dominion University and Virginia Wesleyan College, and she taught both organ and piano privately. She served as organist for the Norfolk Symphony, later known as the Virginia Symphony, and as organist and pianist for the Vogan Chorale, a choral ensemble directed by her husband. During much of her career Frieda helped reshape existing artistic standards by serving in professional roles previously accessible only to men, and she was described by a leading critic of her day as being the finest female organist in the country.

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1940's

Mary Ethel (Rockwell) Skinner ’44 died on November 15, 2013. At K she majored in chemistry. On October 31, 1943, she married Harold O. Skinner. Mary Ethel was a member of First Congregational Church of Kalamazoo and The Park Club. She served many years with the Borgess Service League and worked for several years as a realtor with Don Cain Realtors. Harold and Mary Ethel enjoyed traveling throughout the year and especially loved spending the summers at their beloved cottage on Gun Lake and walking the beach at Hilton Head every October. Besides traveling, Mary Ethel's other loves included: her country, watching the Detroit Tigers, martinis, floral arranging, dogs, chocolate, dining out, fireworks, and bird watching. Most of all she treasured time spent with family and friends. She is survived by two children, two grandchildren and many other family and friends. She was a member of the College's Stetson Society.
Hugh Travis ’44 died on November 28, 2013. He attended K and earned a Ph.D. at Michigan State University in wildlife biology. Hugh served in the U.S. Navy from 1943 to 1946. His career in biology spanned 33 years of federal service in the United States Department of Agriculture. Most of those years were spent in the animal science department at Cornell University where he specialized in animal nutrition. After retirement, he volunteered his time and service to Gadabout, a transportation service for the elderly and those with disabilities in Ithaca, New York. He also volunteered at the Atlantic Wildfowl Heritage Museum in Virginia Beach, Virginia. A lover of outdoors and adventure, Hugh enjoyed observing nature and wildlife while hiking, skiing, canoeing, fishing, photographing, painting, and carving. He traveled to Alaska, Europe, Africa, Mexico, Costa Rica, and New Zealand.
Donald Wilson ’44 died on December 12, 2013. He was 92 years old. Wilson attended Kalamazoo College for a year and completed his degree in mechanical engineering at Northwestern University. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He worked in the engineering department of the Kellogg Company from 1947 to 1981. After retirement, he served as a consultant on various building projects in the Battle Creek, Mich., area.
Barbara (Berk) Bolduc ’48 died on May 4, 2012 at the age of 88. After graduating from K she attended the University of Chicago where she pursued a master's degree in early child development and later taught at the university's Lab School. She and her husband raised six children. She went back to school in her 40s to earn a master's degree in family therapy, and she worked in that field until she was 70.

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1950's

Gail (Curry) Cummings ’52 died on December 12, 2013 at Silverado Senior Living in Irving, Texas. She earned her B.A. in sociology from K. In midlife, Gail earned a master's degree in social work from the University of Texas at Arlington. She enjoyed her career as a social worker at Baylor Hospital and Timberlawn Mental Health System, both in Dallas.
Charles Meeker ’58 died on September 3, 2013. He earned his B.A. with a major in chemistry. Meeker served in the United States Navy for 30 years and retired as a captain. He commanded the U.S.S. Daniel Webster from 1976-1980. After retirement in 1989, he traveled the world and enjoyed his time volunteering at the Naval Undersea Museum. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Francine, their three children, and five grandchildren. Meeker was an avid sports fan, with special loyalties to the Chicago Bears, Seattle Seahawks, and Seattle Mariners, and he enjoyed attending sporting events, sharing stories, going on walks, telling corny jokes, and being a grandpa.

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1960's

Gilbert Rogers ’61 died on December 14, 2013. After high school Rogers joined the U.S. Air Force where he developed a lifelong passion for flying, later becoming an avid amateur pilot and owning several airplanes. He attended K on the GI Bill and was one of the first K students to study abroad in Caen, France. He earned a Ph.D. in educational psychology and counseling from Purdue University in 1970, and then moved to Presque Isle, Maine, where he was a professor of psychology at the University of Maine until 1993. After retiring he moved to Lewistown, Pennsylvania, where he worked as a drug and alcohol counselor and as a hospital outpatient therapist. He also taught part time at Penn State University for many years. Rogers was an excellent woodworker and stained glass artist who wrote several books that he self-published about his life, his children, and his grandchildren. He was also known for his philanthropic endeavors, which included generous gifts for Hispanic youth and to Habitat for Humanity.
David Kent Jackson ’68 died on October 28, 2013. At K he studied abroad in Germany (Muenster) and earned his B.A. in sociology. He earned a master's degree in divinity at Pacific School of Religion (Berkeley, Calif.). He entered Duke University to earn a Ph.D. in the sociology of religion and later became an employee of the University. He worked at Duke for 26 years, retiring in 2010 as an information technology oordinator. David was a sports enthusiast and a true student of the game of baseball, writing several published articles relating to the subject. His other loves included music and animals. He is survived by his son, his sister, and other relatives and friends.
Charles Edward McCants ’68 died on November 3, 2013. He came to K after graduating from Kalamazoo Central High School. He majored in economics and studied abroad in Sierra Leone. He left K to continue work on his B.A. at Western Michigan University and at Southern University Law Center (Baton Rouge, Louisiana). He earned his B.A., M.A., and J.D. from Southern University Law Center. He is survived by his wife and son and granddaughter, as well as his mother, brother, and sister.

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1970's

Patricia (Brown) Fitz-Roy ’72 died on November 5, 2013. She earned her B.A. at K as a music major. Born in Iowa City, Iowa, Patricia grew up in Montclair, N.J. She raised her family in Glen Ridge and then settled in Clifton late in life. She was a music educator for the Newark public schools. She was predeceased by her husband, Donald C. Fitz-Roy Jr., and is survived by her two children, her mother and sister, and other relatives and friends.

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1980's

Randall Black ’82 died on November 23, 2013. He matriculated to K from Sturgis, Michigan. He earned his bachelor's degree in economics and business and studied abroad in Hannover, Germany. He was the Vice President of U.S. Sales for Vascular Flow Technologies. In his many years in the medical technology industry, he traveled and met world renowned surgeons and dignitaries, including the former leader of the Soviet Union, Mikhail Gorbachev. He was a member of the Mensa Organization, and is survived by his wife, his parents, a sister and a brother, and two nieces.

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1990's

Diane Osborne ’91 died on December 1, 2013. She graduated from Petoskey (Mich.) High School and earned her degree in political science at K. She studied abroad in Sierra Leone. Diane became a nutritionist and was a Ph.D. candidate in philosophy at Wisdom School of Graduate Studies in California. She was the founder of Vibrant Traditions. Diane was a healing facilitator, trained in many modalities. She had a love for nature and for travel, and she visited many Third World countries. She had a great compassion for the people who lived in these countries, and she worked to do her part to create world peace.
Bradley Miner ’99 died on December 28, 2013, from injuries sustained in a traffic accident on I-94 in Porter County, Indiana. He earned his B.A. in psychology and studied abroad in Oaxaca, Mexico. Bradley was well known within the techno, house, and electronic music community in Chicago where he had lived for most of the past 13 years. A trained pianist and trumpet player who also composed original music, Miner was a member of a collective of electronic and hip hop artists named "illmeasures" and was a founding member of Freakeasy Music, which held dance parties at Chicago-area clubs.

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2000's

Sarah Jo Mayville ’05 died on November 26, 2013. She was a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Literature at the University of California-San Diego. She was born and raised in Escanaba, Michigan. She earned her bachelor's degree in English at K and studied abroad in Rome, Italy. She completed a master's degree in education at the University of Pennsylvania and then joined Teach for America and taught high school English at Mariana Bracetti Academy Charter High School in Philadelphia. She earned a second master's degree (English) from Marquette University. She studied early British literature and American literature and taught freshman-level composition. At San Diego she took surfing lessons, did yoga, and made and sold mosaic potholders and hand-made jewelry. At UCSD she worked for two years in a writing program for undergraduate students. Her research interests included American literature; theories of contact, borders, nation-building, and empire; critical race and ethnic studies; Native American literature and theory; cultural and historical re-memory; captivity narratives; and inter-American and Caribbean literature.

She loved her work in literature and looked forward to teaching. Sarah remained close to her teacher, friend, and mentor, Gail Griffin (professor emerita of English). Not long after she began her Ph.D. at UCSD she wrote to Gail. That letter begins: "Hi Gail who hatched me from an egg ten years ago last fall (I KNOW, 10 years! crazy...)."

And near its close, Sarah wrote: "The enduring friends/family stay in touch, and I build new communities and families wherever I go. There's a line from a Marge Piercy poem that I feel like I'm always living: 'Work is its own cure. You have to like it more than being loved.' And I do. I love my work....And I want to teach, and I have experience so I'll be marketable, that's for damn sure. I find the whole job market thing kind of freakish, but I'll do it when the time comes. And I'll teach and pay back all those loans I've accumulated and live. Yeah. That's the goal.

"Anyways, even if I haven't written often, I do think of you often, Gail. You are always in my heart...and I really value all the time and effort you gave me. Thank you for hatching me. :) Ok."

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Friends

Ed Baker died on December 11, 2013. He was a professor emeritus of physical education and former Hornet head football coach. Baker came to K in 1967 from from the Haverford School in Philadelphia, Pa., where he led the football team to a 50-20-2 record in nine seasons. He coached Hornet football from 1967 to 1983, when he left that position in order to direct the College's career service center. He coached the football Hornets again in 1988 and 1989. Baker earned his bachelor's degree at Denison University and his master's from Ohio State University. His overall record at K was 62 wins, 89 losses, and 5 ties. His best season was 1978, when the Hornets posted a 6-2 record. On three occasions, Baker's Hornet teams finished third in the MIAA. When he retired in 1990, then acting president Tim Light wrote of Baker: "In his role of coach and teacher, he has manifested a wonderful sensitivity towards young people and an appreciation of their talents. Ed has been consistently one of our finest encouragers of young people, and his sure and proven sense of judgement of people's character and their potential ability to succeed has been an inspiration to the rest of us."
Ian Barbour died on December 24, 2013. He was a professor of physics at Kalamazoo College from 1949 to 1953. He earned his bachelor's degree in physics from Swarthmore College (1943) and a master's degree in physics from Duke University (1946). He earned his doctorate (physics) at the University of Chicago (1949), where he was a teaching assistant for Enrico Fermi, the Manhattan Project scientist responsible for the world's first controlled atomic chain reaction. Barbour left K after receiving a Ford Foundation fellowship, which he used to study theology, ethics, and philosophy at Yale Divinity School. He earned a divinity degree in 1956. He served as a professor of physics and religion at Carleton College (Northfield, Minn.) for more than 30 years. He wrote more than a dozen books that focus on integrating the fields of science and religion.
Franz-Josef "Jupp" Schwaag died in Neusass, Germany, on September 14, 2013. Jupp was an exchange student at K from Muenster, Germany, for the academic year l965-66. He is survived by his wife Kathleen "Kathy" Young Schwaag '65, daughter, Sylvia Schwaag-Serger '90 and her husband Fredrik Serger '90, son Daniel and his wife Allison, and three grandchildren. His family, who lived in the Kurze Strasse 9, was well known to students who studied in Muenster as one of Kalamazoo College's longtime host families.
Andrew Stacilauskas died on December 15, 2013 from complications of the stomach cancer he had battled so valiantly. He was 34 years old. Prior to his death he worked for K's information services department as a computer support specialist. He provided desktop computer support, worked at the Help Desk, and oversaw the student computer labs. Andrew commented on how much he appreciated the strong support of the K community; he felt fortunate to have worked for the College. He is survived by his wife and his parents and siblings.

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