In Memory

Barbara (Rasmussen) Engelhardt ’45

Barbara died on February 14, 2014. She was 90 years old.  Born and reared in Kalamazoo, she earned her B.A. degree from K with a major in French. After earning her Master’s Degree in French at Wellesley College, she was an instructor in Romance Languages at Ripon College (Ripon, Wisconsin), where she met her future husband Melvin. They moved to Bethesda, Md., in 1954. In Bethesda she was very active in the Suburban Women’s Club. She later worked as a program administrator and editorial assistant for the international headquarters of the General Federation of Women’s Club.

Paul Joseph Carpenter ’49

Paul died on March 6, 2014. He served with the U.S. Navy in the Pacific theater during World War II, and his war experiences precipitated his lifelong advocacy for peace and justice. After the war he graduated earned his B.A. in sociology from K and then earned his Master of Divinity degree from Union Theological Seminary in New York City. His thesis advisor there was the noted theologian Reinhold Niebuhr. Paul was ordained in the Community Baptist Church of Montgomery Center, Vermont in 1954. He also served American Baptist churches in Cleveland and Norwalk, Ohio. He was granted standing in the Congregational Church (known today as the United Church of Christ) in 1962, and he served UCC churches in Parkman, Brecksville, and Youngstown, Ohio, where he was instrumental in establishing a chapter of Habitat For Humanity. At the age of 55 Carpenter returned to school, achieving a master’s degree in community counseling. He concluded his career ministering successfully to persons suffering with mental illness in the Youngstown community.

Lloyd Burns ’50

Lloyd died on February 19, 2014, after a long illness. He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., grew up in Garden City, N.Y., and graduated from Kalamazoo College with a degree in physics. He spent two years in the United States Army Chemical Corp. He worked as an engineer for General Electric’s nuclear energy division for 37 years as well as an additional 10 years after retirement.

Richard Means ’52

Richard died on February 15, 2014. He was a beloved professor emeritus of sociology at the College who first arrived on campus as an undergraduate student in 1948, when he transferred from the University of Toledo. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in philosophy. At K he won the Hodge Prize in philosophy and was president of the student body. He was also a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He and fellow K graduate, Joyce Allen, married in 1953.

Richard earned a bachelor’s degree in divinity from Colgate Rochester Divinity School (1956) and an M.A. and Ph.D. (sociology) from Cornell University (1959 and 1964, respectively). He served as a chaplain at Cornell (1956-59) and was ordained as an Associate Minster of the First Congregational Church (1957). He returned to K in 1961, where he received tenure (1964) and was promoted to full professor (1972). He retired from K in 1993, having served the College for 32 years.

Among the qualities that made him exceptional, wrote his colleague and friend, Dean of the Chapel Robert Dewey, on the occasion of Mean’s 25th service anniversary with the College, were his “command of a discipline, intellectual curiosity beyond that discipline, stimulating conversation, collegial support, a sense of humor, a broad range of interests and an impressive knowledge of each, a passionate concern for the vitality and quality of the College and for the problems confronting society, the nation, and the world.” His research and teaching interests were broad and deep and included the family, criminology, mental health institutions, the sociology of religion, race relations, alcohol and drug abuse, the environment, and social gerontology. Citing the breadth of his colleague’s intellectual interests Dean Dewey likened Richard to “a man in a conning tower rotating his periscope across the wide horizon to see and grasp what he finds there.” Richard wrote numerous journal articles on various topics in sociology and religion, and he was the author of the book The Ethical Imperative: The Value Crisis in America, which was used in college classes at Grinnell and Carleton, among others.

After he retired from K, Richard served as interim minster of the First Congregational Church of Kalamazoo. He then served as interim minster of the First Congregational Church of Coloma, Michigan.

He is survived by Joyce, his wife of 60 years, their three children, three grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews.

Richard Topel ’53

Richard died on January 31, 2014. He attended the University of Michigan before he came to K. He earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry at K and a master’s in education from Western Michigan University. Richard served in the U.S. Army during the Korean Conflict. On May 21, 1955 he married Joanne Margaret Enkelmann. She preceded him in death on December 28, 2009. Richard was employed at Hardy Salt Company for 23 years. He was a member of the Trinity Lutheran Church of Manistee (Mich.) and was active with the Trinity School Board, Church Council, and Board of Elders. He was also a member of Trinity’s Dart Ball team. He loved to bowl and fish. He had a great passion for music and was Dr. Jazz on Manistee Radio WMTE for a number years.

Diane (Nelson) Goodwin ’67

Diane died on January 26, 2014. She was born in Blue Island, Illinois, and lived there until after she graduated from Kalamazoo College. At K she majored in mathematics and studied abroad in Munster, Germany. After college she lived in Washington, D.C., Santa Monica (Calif.) and Austin (Texas) before returning to Plainfield, Illinois in early 2013. She earned her M.A. in educational technology from Pepperdine University. In 1973-1974 she lived in Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon), Vietnam, teaching transportation planning models to Vietnamese students and public employees. During her career she generated computerized models for traffic and civic planning organizations, and served as a project manager for nationwide traffic engineering and civic planning research studies. She also served as manager of forecasting for Mattel Toys for ten years.  She taught computer use to grade school students and retired seniors. She traveled around the world, served as president of historical and heritage societies, and become a certified master naturalist. She has been a sports car race worker, a fine art collector, an avid skier, a garden railroader, a rescuer of Golden Retrievers, and an equestrian. She also learned the art of bonsai and was deeply involved in parent and teacher organizations throughout her son’s education. Among family members who survive are her husband of 44 years, Browne, and her son, Daniel.

Ann (Middaugh) Bosma ’68

Ann died on May 27, 2013. She died peacefully of complications from leukemia with her family by her side. She earned her bachelor’s degree in English and studied abroad in Clermont-Ferrand, France. She also met the love of her life at K, Steve Bosma ’65, and married him after graduation. She received her master’s degree from Occidental College (Los Angeles, Calif.).

Ann and Steve raised their two children in south Torrance, where Ann volunteered as a class aide and president of the Riviera Elementary PTA. She and other Riviera moms began a Friday breakfast tradition that has continued for 30 years. Ann was a big watcher of sports and was her children’s number one fan, going to all of their games. Fortunately for Steve, she also liked to follow college and pro basketball and other sports, even if while watching at home she was multi-tasking on a needlepoint or cross stitch project.

Ann was an athlete herself, finding her passion on the dance floor, first as a student and then an instructor of aerobic dancing. She taught for more than 25 years and had a very loyal group of students, many of whom became good friends. After classes they would get coffee and trade books, feeding her voracious reading habit. As an only child, Ann cherished these relationships with her lifelong friends, her cousins, and Steve’s siblings and their spouses. She also enjoyed music and traveling. She played in the hand bell choir at church and on her piano at home, and frequently had playlists running on her iPod at home and in her car.

For travel, Ann and Steve often visited Michigan. After their 29th wedding anniversary they also made yearly trips outside the US, with Europe a favorite destination.

Ann died one month before she and Steve would have celebrated their 45th wedding anniversary. She was preceded in death by her son Michael. She is survived by Steve and their daughter Rachel.

Ed Coyle ’74

Not long ago BeLight learned about Ed’s untimely death. He passed away on November 27, 2012, due to a stroke. He was very active in sports during his time at K, playing football and running track and field. He was a political science major and earned a teaching certificate. Ed had a varied career as a teacher, insurance broker, and computer salesman. He had many health issues culminating with a kidney transplant in the year before his death. Ed is survived by his sister, Helene Lapp, and he is missed by his two sons, Ed and Andy Coyle, and his 4 grandchildren, Maelynn and Gage Coyle, Caleb Coyle, and Kaiya Singleton.

 

Cheryl Hanna ’88

Cheryl died on July 27, 2014. She was a professor at the Vermont Law School and a well-known legal analyst. She earned her bachelor’s degree at K in anthropology and sociology and earned her law degree from Harvard. After working as an assistant state’s attorney in Baltimore, Hanna began her teaching career at Vermont Law School in 1994. She often offered legal commentary to the Vermont media on a wide range of topics. Those included the death penalty, abortion, the First Amendment, and the legal fight to close the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant. She was known for making recondite legal language accessible to lay audiences and for elucidating the impact of legal decisions on everyday people. Hanna was active with the Girl Scouts and with Council for the Future of Vermont. She was elected the chairwoman of the board of trustees for the Richard and Barbara Snelling Center for Government in 2010. She also had served on the board of trustees of Planned Parenthood of Northern New England and as a member of the Vermont Gender Bias Study Implementation Task Force. Hanna also was a recipient of the Sister Elizabeth Candon Distinguished Service Award by Vermont Women in Higher Education. She is survived by her husband, Paul Henninge, and their two children.

Alice Lynette (Spath) Blanchard

Alice, who went by her middle name of Lynette, died on March 13, 2014. She taught flute for 30 years at Kalamazoo College. At an early age, she became a flutist with the Kalamazoo Junior Symphony Orchestra, rapidly advancing to first chair. She graduated from the School of Music at the University of Michigan in 1943. During her college summers she taught flute at the renowned Interlochen Music Camp. In 1943 she married Raywood Helmer Blanchard, who after his military service as a pilot in the Army Air Corps, enjoyed a career as an international patent attorney. Lynette served as principle flutist with the Kalamazoo Symphony Orchestra for 25 years. When the couple retired to McAllen, Texas, she was the first chair flutist and president of the McAllen Town Band. She was an avid golfer and active in the Methodist Church. You could find her playing the piano for her Sunday school class on any Sunday when she wasn’t fishing with her son in Rockport, Texas.

Babette (Sellhausen) Trader, Retired Dean of Academic Advising

Babette died on May 12, 2014, in Sarasota, Fla. She served nearly 20 years at Kalamazoo College in various positions in the department of student affairs, including dean of students and dean of academic advising.  She received her B.A. from the University of Maryland and her master’s degree from Indiana University. In addition to her work with students at K, Babette served at two other colleges: Randolph-Macon Woman’s College (Lynchburg, Va.) and Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, Mich.). In 2002, she received the Weimer K. Hicks Award from Kalamazoo College for distinguished service. Her professional affiliations were a source of great pride. She was a member of Alpha Xi Delta, a fraternity devoted to education for women, and received the Order of the Pearl award for 60 years of membership in the fraternity. Other professional affiliations included president of the State of Michigan Association of Women Deans, Administrators and Counselors; the Michigan Student Personnel and Guidance Association; and Delta Kappa Gamma. She was a former member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. On April 19, 1949, she married Robert B. Trader. After their successful careers in Kalamazoo, they retired to Hilton Head, S.C., and then to Sarasota. Babette loved to play tennis, mahjong, and bridge. She was an avid reader and volunteer. She was preceded in death Robert; at the time of his death, they had been married 54 years. Babette is survived by her daughters, Christine Burris and Diane Trader, her grandchildren, and her great-grandchildren.