Class Notes

June (Wilmsen) Severance ’45

June has published, at age 90, From the Inside: A Look at Nursing Homes and Their Patients in Today’s Elder Care System. The book provides her insider look at the day-to-day happenings of  nursing homes both as a resident and a friend to residents.  Central to those observations is her unique mix of humor, introspection, and occasional depression as she faced the work of getting well and coping with pain.

During the last decade June spent nine months in three different nursing homes in Montana and the Midwest. “People need to know what it’s like to be in a nursing home,” she said.

Though it occurred decades ago, her father’s nursing home stay in New York  remains seared into her memory, and was the impetus for the book.   “I was so furious,” she remembers.  “It was so negative.  To be in a nursing home is to truly be someone different.”  But, over the years, she says, she learned that “Nursing homes are NOT the worst thing in the world.  I came to scorn and stayed to praise,” she concludes.

June enrolled in Kalamazoo College at the age of 16.  She majored in English and theatre. The latter may not be surprising, given the fact that she had been a child performer at the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair. During her student days at K, a weekly campus segment she did on the local radio station eventually became a full-time job with CBS-WKZO in Kalamazoo. She worked on a feature called “News of Women Today,” which carried stories on women’s responses to World War II throughout the world and the effect the war had on women’s status and work.

June and her husband, Wayne, have lived near Whitehall, Montana for 20 years.  They spent most of their marriage in East Aurora, N.Y., where Wayne worked for Fisher-Price.  June earned her M.A.  at Syracuse University and taught there. She also directed plays at both the Buffalo and the East Aurora theaters. And she performed her own material in a series of one-woman shows. She and Wayne eventually moved west to be closer to their two sons and five grandchildren. She helped establish a theatre group in Whitehall. For four years, “Jefferson Valley Presents” staged an outdoor dinner theatre production on the Lewis and Clark expedition. June wrote the script, performed, and helped with the costuming.

Jeannie Light ’63

Jeannie has published a new book, Beautiful on the Mountain, which released on June 1 from Tyndale Momentum. The book is based on her experiences as a lay missioner in Graves Mill, Virginia, but the story starts further back than that. Jeannie was born into a storytelling family. Her grandmother passed down stories she had heard from her own mother and father, frontier missionaries in southern Michigan. Her grandfather told stories, too, and so did her mother and father. With that bloodline, Jeannie’s desire to be a writer seemed natural, and she pursued that goal by earning a bachelor’s in English literature (with an emphasis on creative writing) at K. During her senior year she was a student teacher for a college freshman English class and worked as a freelance journalist. She wrote an award-winning novel based on family stories about fur traders and American Indians in Michigan’s St. Joseph River valley in the early years of the nineteenth century.

Jeannie attended the University of Virginia on a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship, receiving her M.A. in English literature. She worked as a journalist, taught English at the University of Maine and for the University of Virginia extension program, and ran a farm in Madison County, Virginia. In 1977 she decided to operate a sheep farm on her mountain land in Graves Mill, Virginia, adjoining Shenandoah National Park. To her surprise, the deacons of the inactive Baptist church in the hamlet asked her to help them re-open its doors and revive the congregation. She had never intended to be a preacher or missionary, but when she moved to the mountain community, she found herself living stories very similar to those she had heard as a child. Beautiful on the Mountain is the narrative of her first three years in this beautiful, austere setting. The Bishop of the Diocese of Virginia licensed Jeannie as a lay missioner in 1983. Graves Chapel eventually opened a thrift shop and ministered to those at or below the poverty level, 60 percent of the county’s residents at the time. Though Jeannie remained a laywoman, she was elected president of the county ministerial association, and the chapel offered silent retreats for the local clergy. After fifteen years in the mountains, she resigned and worked with artist and sculptor Walter Slaughter. She self-published two books of meditations, Are You Coming?: Meditations on the Passion and Gethsemane, both illustrated with Walter’s art.

In 1985 Jeannie became a member of Truro Anglican Church (Fairfax, Va.) and since her resignation from Graves Chapel, she has ministered at Truro in various capacities as a layperson, including leading bimonthly services at the Fairfax Nursing Center and teaching a Bible study. She lives in Louisa, Virginia. Jeannie’s work at Graves Chapel was featured in Kalamazoo College Quarterly in the summer of 1991.

John Bolin ’65

John Bolin and Ed Menta

John returned to the Kalamazoo College campus (and stage) in late February. The timing was fortuitous. John played the role of a fireman in the 1964 production of Max Frisch’s The Firebugs, directed by Nelda Balch. Fifty years later, to celebrate the Golden Anniversary of Festival Playhouse of Kalamazoo College (founded by Balch), Ed Menta staged a reprise of The Firebugs. John returned to campus to meet with the 2014 cast and crew before opening night. He also was part of an audience-performer conversation that occurred after the opening night performance. John (left) is pictured with Menta, the James B. Stone College Professor of Theatre Arts.

David Chapman ’69

David is on Fulbright Fellowship this spring during which time he is affiliated with the Malaysia National Higher Education Research Institute in Penang. During this fellowship he gave an invited presentation–”Widely Recognized Problems, Controversial Solutions: Issues and Strategies for Higher Education Development in East Asia”–to faculty and students at the International Islamic University of Malaysia (IIUM) in Kuala Lumpur. David is a professor in the University of Minnesota’s Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development. During his fellowship in Malaysia he represented the university in signing a memorandum of understanding with IIUM that may eventually lead to faculty exchanges, joint internship programs, and other collaborative educational projects.

Thomas Neubig ’76

Thomas is the new Deputy Head of the Centre for Tax Policy and Administration ’s Tax Policy and Statistics Division at the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). He will be working on the G-20 requested anti-Base Erosion and Profit Shifting global tax initiative.  Neubig has over 30 years’ experience as an economist in both government and the private sector. He has spent the last 20 years at Ernst & Young, where he founded and led a group of 34 tax policy economists, statisticians, and survey specialists. He eared his B.A. in economics from K and his Ph.D. in economics for the University of Michigan. The OECD provides a forum in which governments can work together to share experiences and seek solutions to common problems; works with governments to understand what drives economic, social and environmental change; measures productivity and global flows of trade and investment; analyzes and compares data to predict future trends; and sets international standards on a wide range of matters. Jane (Crane) Neubig ’77 retired from her social work position with Goodwin House. Jane and Tom will live in Paris for up to two years.

Josef Jarosch ’76

Josef, a visiting international student from Germany during the 1972-73 academic year, took a stroll around the K campus with his wife, Dorothea, last October 25. Now living in Marloffstein, Germany, Josef and Dorothea also visited Rob ’76 and Val ’76 Van Patten in Grand Rapids, Carolyn Sevin ’74 in St. Clair Shores, Patricia Harrington ’76 in Cary, Ill., Heidi Gregori-Gahan ’76 in Evansville, Ind., and Jeffrey Barbour ’75 in Titusville, Fla. Josef encourages K pals from yesteryear to contact him at josefj.jarosch@gmail.com.

Carol Saro ’77

Carol was named director of customer service for Eaton Corporation’s Aerospace Group’s Aftermarket Division. Carol joined Eaton in 2005 after working in a variety of customer service roles at Northwest Airlines. Most recently at Eaton she served as director of customer service for the Fluid and Electrical Distribution Division. She earned her bachelor’s degree at K in psychology.

Julie Halstead ’79

Julie has joined REVPAR International as a Vice President in the firm’s Washington, D.C., office. REVPAR is an advisory and asset management company dedicated to the hospitality and tourism industries. Halstead started her hotel career at the historic Hotel Del Coronado and the Sheraton Harbor Island in San Diego, California.  She spent 15 years in the development planning and feasibility department of Marriott International, and she has worked independently as a hotel advisor and asset manager. Her work at REVPAR will focus on market and financial due diligence, valuation, strategic planning, investment decision analysis, among other duties. In addition to her B.A. (biology) from K, Julie earned an M.B.A. at Michigan State University. She is fluent in Spanish and familiar with Portuguese, and she has lived in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico. At K she studied abroad in Madrid, Spain.

Robert MacCoun ’80

Robert will join the Stanford University faculty as a professor of law this summer. He is currently a professor of law and public policy at Berkeley Law School. At Stanford he also will hold a joint appointment as a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute. Robert is a psychologist and behavioral scientist whose research, teaching and work outside the academy has focused on focused on illicit drug use, drug policy, alternative dispute resolution, judgment and decision-making, social influence, and bias in the use and interpretation of research evidence by scientists, journalists, and citizens. His recent publications include “Moral Outrage and Opposition to Harm Reduction,” Criminal Law & Philosophy, 7, 83-98, (2013); “The Burden of Social Proof: Shared Thresholds and Social Influence,” Psychological Review, (2012); and “An Agnostic’s Guide to the Drug Legalization Debate,” Annual Review of Law & Social Science (2011). Robert also has written on the military’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy, and his work on that issue was influential in the policy debates about allowing gays and lesbians to serve openly in the military.

Mary Sauer-Games ’83

The American Psychological Association (APA) has appointed Mary to the position of senior director, PsycINFO. She manages the development and growth of APA research databases, while expanding their coverage and uncovering new product opportunities. She also is responsible for the ongoing development of APA PsycNET, the organization’s search platform that seeks new ways of strengthening the connections for students, researchers, and psychologists between the questions that they need to answer and the most relevant information available to meet that need. The APA is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States.

Michael Cooney ’83

Michael has been re-appointed to the board of directors of Vangold Resources Ltd., a Canadian-based mineral and petroleum exploration company. Michael has been chairman of NEMI Northern Energy & Mining Inc. since March 2009. Prior to that, he was a private investor working on both the Pacific Options Exchange and the Chicago Board Options Exchange. He holds a B.Sc. degree in mechanical engineering from University of Michigan and a B.A. in physics from K.

Robin (Alexander) Sakamoto ’85

Robin was appointed Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Studies for Kyorin University located on the Hachioji campus in Tokyo, Japan. She may be the first foreign woman to hold the post of dean in a highly respected Japanese university. Sakamoto received her Ph.D. in educational policy and administration in 2006.

Thomas Meyers ’85

Thomas has joined Greenleaf Trust as a trust relationship officer, responsible for day-to-day trust administration and fiduciary compliance. His broad knowledge of trusts and legacy planning adds a valuable strategic perspective to the holistic wealth management plans at Greenleaf. Thomas practiced law for more than 20 years and has more than 20 years of experience in trust administration and fiduciary risk management. He is also a Certified Trust and Financial Advisor.

Sally Smith ’86

Sally is the new library director of the Ray Township Library (Macomb County, Mich.). Her previous positions have included reference librarian and the University of Michigan-Dearborn, and children’s librarian at Harper woods Public Library and Canton Public Library. She earned her bachelor’s degree at K with majors in English and psychology. She earned her master’s degree (library science) from Wayne State University.

Helene (Baker) Dunbar ’87

John, Keira, and Helene Dunbar

Helene experienced a crazy year in 2013. First she sold two young adult contemporary books, the first of which, These Gentle Wounds, was published by Flux on May 8 of this year. Then, in December 2013, she and her husband, John, brought their daughter Keira home from Bulgaria. Helene still lives in Nashville, works in marketing, and assumes that 2014 will probably be just at frantic.

Charlene Boyer Lewis ’87

Charlene , a professor of history at Kalamazoo College, was recently selected into the Organization of American Historians’ Distinguished Lectureship Program.

Suzanne (Borsum) Kamata ’87

Suzanne published her third novel, Screaming Divas, about an all-girl band in 1980s South Carolina. The book was acquired and edited by New York Times bestselling author-turned-editor Jacquelyn Mitchard for Adams Media/Merit Press.

Michael Winkelman ’91

Michael has published a new book: A Cognitive Approach to John Donne’s Songs and Sonnets, part of publisher Palgrave Macmillan’s series titled “Cognitive Studies in Literature and Performance.” Investigations into brain function have led to recent remarkable discoveries with profound implications for interpreting literature. Donne, who wrote in the 17th century, was a contemporary of Shakespeare and one of the first Metaphysical poets. He later became a famous cleric many of whose meditations are cited today. For example, “Meditation XVII” from Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions includes the famous prose passage that begins “No man is an island” and concludes with “And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.” Donne’s probing insights, expressed in his unique Metaphysical style, make his amorous verse a ripe subject for cognitive analysis. Winkelman’s study applies recent breakthroughs from neuroscience and evolutionary psychology in order to deepen the understanding of Donne’s songs and sonnets. By applying findings from neurolinguistics to Donne’s work, Winkelman presents a test case for the cognitive interpretation of verse and, more broadly, advances the case of New Humanism.

Michael Finkler ’91

Mike was the elder statesman, so to speak, of several generations of Kalamazoo College biology majors who attended the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. Pictured with Mike (far left) are (l-r): Sarah Bouchard ’95, associate professor of biology, Otterbein University; Claire Riggs ’11, graduate student in the department of biology at Portland State University; Wendy Reed ’92, associate professor and chair of biological sciences, North Dakota State University; Eddy Price ’99, post-doctoral fellow, Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin; Alan Faber ’14, biology major at K; and Ed Dzialowski ’93, associate professor and associate chair of biological sciences, University of North Texas.

Billee Lightvoet-Ward ’94

Billee has joined the Grand Rapids (Mich.) office of the law firm Dickinson Wright PLLC. She specializes in health care law, corporate law, and commercial transactions. Billee is a member of various professional trade associations and is recognized as a Michigan Super Lawyers “Rising Star” in health care law.

Jessica English ’94

Jessica won the grand prize in the Kzoom Video $10,000 video services giveaway in Kalamazoo. Jessica owns and operates Birth Kalamazoo, which offers natural childbirth and breastfeeding classes, birth and postpartum doulas, lactation consults, and birth doula training. She received $7,500 in video services, after receiving 4,091 votes in the online voting contest.

Jessica Halonen ’94

Jessica juried the University of North Dakota Department of Art & Design annual Student Art Collective competition in the University’s Hughes Fine Arts Center. Jessica is assistant professor in the Department of Art and Art History at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. She received her M.F.A. degree in painting from Washington University in Saint Louis. She has been an artist-in-residence at the MacDowell Colony in New Hampshire and a Core Fellow at the Glassell School of Art, Museum of Fine Arts, in Houston, Texas.

Paul Blowers ’95

Paul has been named chief information officer of Plante Moran, a public accounting and business advisory firm. In his new role, he will be responsible for the information technology that supports Plante Moran’s enterprise goals. Blowers has IT leadership experience in strategy, architecture, solution delivery and operations. Prior to joining Plante Moran, he worked for Kelly Services as chief architect and senior director of enterprise architecture and business solutions. At K, Blowers majored in psychology and was a stand-out member of the Hornet swim team, earning Division III All-American honors. Blowers is the co-author of the textbook, e-Commerce in Virtual Worlds.

Erin (Miller) Dominianni ’95

Erin submitted a wonderful homecoming photo. Seems the vintage football jerseys were a hit with the young kids last October. Pictured are the children of Erin and her husband Andy Dominianni ’94 and the children of Sara (Howard) Amy ’95 and Steve Jacobson ’94.

Anjalee (Deshpande) Hutchinson ’95

Anjalee is now a tenured professor of theatre at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pa. She earned her M.F.A. degree in directing from Northwestern University.

Teju Cole ’96

Teju published a short story titled “Hafiz.” Or, rather, his Twitter followers published it through a series of tweets and re-tweets. The unusual publishing technique garnered a lot of news media attention. Cole is the author of the critically acclaimed novel Open City.

Christa Clapp ’97

Christa has a new job. She is team leader and senior advisor on climate finance at the Center for International Climate and Environmental Research Oslo. She and her family reside in Oslo, Norway.

Carrie Heitman ’98

Carrie recently appeared in the world premiere of The Summoners, a play staged at the C.O.W. in New York City, and in International Falls at the Roundabout Theatre Company, also in New York. After earning a B.A. in philosophy from K, Carrie received her M.F.A. degree from University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she received the Louise Lamont Award for Excellence as well as honors in all areas of performance. She has appeared off-Broadway and performed in the United Kingdom, Poland, Russia, and Malaysia. Among many other plays, she has acted in The Mystery Spot, directed by K alumna Holly Hughes ’77. Carrie is also a teaching artist with Roundabout. You can read more about her at her website.

Aaron Saari ’98

Aaron is the new part-time pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Yellow Springs, Ohio. A bible scholar and theologian, Aaron is the author of The Many Deaths of Judas Iscariot, a book about the historical figure and the issue of suicide. He has been a visiting professor at Xavier and an adjunct instructor at Antioch University Midwest, teaching courses in writing, Christianity, and non-western religions.

David Porada ’02

David is project manager in the Detroit office of Tri-Merit LLC, a national leader in providing research and development tax-credit services to CPA firms and individual clients. He holds a law degree from University of Detroit Mercy School of Law. He previously served as an account executive at Robert Half Legal where he dealt directly with executives at corporations and partners at law firms to assess their needs and address complex issues. David also spent time as a research specialist with Thomson Reuters Westlaw.

Mike Carlson ’02

Mike is a distinguished alumnus (political science major) and a great intramural softball teammate (he played on a championship team when he was a staff member at K). Mike recently shared a professional and personal connection that started with a LuxEsto class note.

“Years ago (2007, I believe),” wrote Mike, “LuxEsto published an update on my life at a new Denver-area I.B. elementary school where I was teaching.  Mike Galvin ’70, an accomplished educator and fellow K grad living in Colorado, read the blurb and e-mailed me. Shortly thereafter we talked on the phone and agreed to meet in person.  Our connection was instantly a strong one.

“Over the last several years, Mike and I have become even closer, partly because my career path seems to be mimicking his.  We both fell into teaching seemingly by accident (while substitute teaching–he in Chicago, me in Denver) and fell in love with it.  We both started as elementary teachers.  He becamee a principal and eventually a consultant to school principals and superintendents through his work with McRel, an organization that specializes in mentoring school leaders and leading educator evaluations.  Eventually, Mike started up his own consulting business.  Somehow, he has also found the time to mentor me!

“I recently completed my master’s degree in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from the University of Denver.  When I was looking for a position that would help me grow as a school leader, Mike steered me toward the Sheridan School District, which has been my home this year. I work as the district’s middle school instructional coach.  I am back on the market, looking for school principal/director positions, and  Mike is again an invaluable resource to me as I search.

“Mike and I have also enjoyed meeting up and discovering more similarities between our lives–including the fact that both of our wives have taught French! He also met with me the day my father died. Having him in my life has meant a great deal, personally and professionally, and it all resulted from a serendipitous connection through LuxEsto.”

Nick Carlin-Voigt ’04

Nick has been selected by College Soccer News as one of the top 15 Division I  assistant coaches in the country. He is entering his third season as men’s soccer assistant coach at UCLA. Nick is considered one of the top recruiters in the country. In his first year with the Bruins he helped lead the team to its second consecutive PAC-12 championship. In his second season he led the effort to bring in the No. 1 ranked recruiting class. And, this past off season, he again helped bring in the consensus No. 1 ranked recruiting class.

Ryan Anthony Hatch ’04

Ryan accepted a position as assistant professor of modern and contemporary drama at California Polytechnic University (San Luis Obispo). He will build the drama curriculum from the ground up and teach courses in contemporary avant-garde theater and performance as well as queer theory and psychoanalytic theory.

Kate Markiewicz ’04

Kate has been named a senior fellow by the Knowles Science Teaching Foundation. KSTF fellowships support teachers of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Kate teaches at Boston Latin School in Boston, Mass. She graduated from K with a B.A. in chemistry and physics. She studied ion-selective electrodes in Kalamazoo, modeled solar coronal loops at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC, and worked with graduate students in a chemistry lab in Erlangen, Germany.

Kate moved to Boston to pursue graduate work in chemistry at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). During her first year there, Kate worked as a teaching assistant. “Working with students was extremely rewarding and was what I enjoyed most.” Kate left MIT to work as a substitute teacher in the Boston Public School System and as head coach for the Boston Latin School Science Olympiad team. “I discovered that high school students were a lot of fun.”

Kate completed her master’s degree in education through the Boston Teacher Residency and the University of Massachusetts-Boston and began teaching full time at Boston Latin School in 2007. Kate has presented the results of her teacher research at the 2008, 2009, and 2010 National Science Teachers Association Conferences in Boston, New Orleans and Philadelphia, respectively.

Molly Parker ’05, D.O.

Molly opened a family practice with a special interest in women’s health at Three Meadows Medical Plaza in Hillsdale, Mich. The Ann Arbor native earned her doctor of osteopathy degree at Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine in Kirksville, Mo. She recently completed her residency in Coldwater, Mich.

Brett Blaauw ’05

Brett co-authored a paper that appeared in the Journal of Applied Ecology. According to paper’s other co-author, Rufus Isaacs, theirs is the first paper that demonstrates an economic advantage for farmers when they create wild bee habitat next to cultivated fields. The two entomologists planted marginal land surrounding blueberry fields with a mix of native perennial wildflowers. Even though the fields were pollinated by honey bees trucked in for the purpose, Brett discovered that, after a period of two years, the rising population of wild bees increased blueberry yields by 10 to 20 percent. That increase more than offset the costs of making the marginal land attractive to wild bee populations. Brett was the lead author on the paper. The K biology major completed his Ph.D. at Michigan State University under Isaacs and is now working at Rutgers University.

Caroline (Orosz) Robbins ’07

Caroline (Carly) recently published her first novel, Devil Music. She has also published a series of free Web comics to accompany the novel. Both works are entirely self-published. Carly earned an M.F.A. (poetry) from Sarah Lawrence College. Her poetry has been published in Wavelength Journal and SpoutMagazine. An article on Carly and her work will appear in the Fall issue of LuxEsto.

Andy Cole ’07

Andy was named Client Solutions Director for Interaction Associates. The firm specializes in global consulting and training innovation; Andy will work in its Boston, Mass., office. Before joining IA Andy co-created two successful businesses in the innovation and technology marketplace. His background also includes product development in aerospace with Google, non-emissive fuels with the EPA, neuroscience with the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and Technology, energy efficiency with the Environmental Defense Fund, and renewable energy with Vestas Wind Systems. Andy was a 3-2 engineering major at Kalamazoo College. He earned a B.A. in physics from K, and he earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan. He earned an M.B.A. in entrepreneurial leadership from Babson College (Wellesley, Mass.)

Seth Gold ’07

Seth married Noelle Pepe on April 19, 2014. Seth is a bond analyst at Zazove Convertible Securities Management, an asset management firm in Incline Village, Nev. He earned his B.A. at K in economics and business and received an M.B.A. from Columbia University.

Zachary Norman ’07

Zachary recently (April 30 through May 11) exhibited his Master of Fine Art degree thesis exhibition, Exotic Matter, at the Indiana University Art Museum. Zachary is a 2014 M.F.A. candidate in photography at I.U. in Bloomington, Ind.

Claire Eder ’10

Claire has a new job. She is a graduate teaching assistant at Ohio University (Athens, Ohio).

Laura Fox ’10

Laura is working as a preschool teacher’s aide at Pope John XXIII School of Saint Mary and Saint Nicholas Parishes in Evanston, Ill. She spends her summers teaching drama and music at the American School in Switzerland. Laura is working on her master of teaching (MAT) in elementary education at Northeastern Illinois University.

Bethany Gross ’10

Bethany is a coauthor of the article “Evaluation of 3D Printing and its Potential Impact on Biotechnology and the Chemical Sciences,” published in Analytical Chemistry in January. Nearing 30 years since its introduction, 3D printing technology is set to revolutionize research and teaching laboratories. The article encompasses the history of 3D printing, reviews various printing methods, and presents current applications. The authors offer an appraisal of the future direction and impact the technology will have on laboratory settings as 3D printers become more accessible. Gross’s research at Michigan State University encompasses the development of a flow-based 3D printed microfluidic device with integrated electrodes to initiate and evaluate injury-induced blood-clot formation.

Paloma Clohossey ’11

Paloma has a new job. She is an information officer at USAID’s Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance.

Cody Musselman ’11

Cody is pursuing a Master’s degree in theological studies at Harvard Divinity School, focusing on the religions of the Americas, with a special interest in American civil religion and material culture. She is also an intern for the Harvard University Pluralism Project, which helps Americans engage with the realities of religious diversity through research, outreach, and the active dissemination of resources. Cody majored in religion at K and studied abroad in Chiang Mai, Thailand. For the past several years she has worked as an outdoor education instructor. Eventually she intends to obtain a doctorate degree in religion.

Sam Bertken ’12

Sam wrote a delightful entry for the real estate blog Movoto titled “30 Things You Need To Know About Kalamazoo Before You Move There.” (K received TWO entries in his post.) At last count, Sam’s entry had garnered nearly 50,000 views.

Maggie Kane ’13

Maggie is program quality coordinator for the St. Paul (Minn.) Public Schools Foundation, an AmeriCorps position. She’ll spend the next year coordinating tutoring programs that support literacy and math at the public schools, evaluating the success of those programs, and working with the resource library to assist tutoring partners.

Zari Haggenmiller ’13

Zari serves as an AmeriCorps tutor and mentor in the Detroit Public Schools. What to do during her summer break was not a problem for Zari. She is a leader for Teen Treks, an adventure biking and hostelling program based in Buffalo, New York. As part of that leadership role she keeps a blog, in which she mentions Kalamazoo College and memorable Kal-Haven bike trek. Leadership is in Zari’s DNA. She served as a President’s Ambassador her senior year and is a Class Agent for the Class of 2013. Of particular interest in her blog is her long and liberal arts-ish list of interests, and the fact that she’s been attending bike mechanic classes.

Megan Rosenberg ’13

Megan was assistant stage manager for the recent Ann Arbor-based Performance Network Theatre production of the David Ives play, Venus in Fur. Megan earned a double minor in French and sociology/anthropology at K. Her Kalamazoo College Festival Playhouse directing résumé included: Bringing Home the Bones, director, and Into the Woods, assistant director.  Her acting credits include Violet Venable in Suddenly Last Summer and Clara in Alison Shields (by K alumnus Joe Tracz ’04). She continues her apprenticeship at Performance Network Theatre. Her eventual career goal is to be the artistic director of a small theatre company. Founded in 1981, Performance Network Theatre reaches 40,000 theatre patrons and children each year through its Professional Series and the Children’s Theatre Network. Performance Network Theatre also presents the Fireside New Play Festival and a series of classes on theatre-related topics.

Keeney Swearer ’13

Keeney has been hired as exhibit designer for the Mackinac State Historic Parks, working on Mackinaw Island and the mainland to design, build, and maintain exhibits for five state parks. He was part of a group art show at the Kalamazoo Book Arts Center in Kalamazoo in February. Read more about Keeney and see his artwork at his website.

Michael Korn ’14

Michael was awarded a 2014 David S. Bruce Outstanding Undergraduate Abstract Award from the American Physiological Society. Michael did a research internship in a muscle physiology laboratory. That work became the basis of his Senior Individualized Project: “The protective effects of simvastatin on muscle in a rat model of chronic rotator cuff injury.” Winter term was a good one for awards for Michael. He also was one of the College’s Senior Leadership Award winners.

Lor Vang ’14

Lor is one of some 550 U.S. undergraduate and graduate students who received a Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) from the U.S. Department of State. CLS participants spend seven to 10 weeks in intensive language institutes in one of 13 countries. Lor spent the summer in China focusing on the study of Chinese language. CLS Program participants are among the more than 40,000 academic and professional exchange program participants supported annually by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs to promote mutual understanding and respect between the people of the United States and the people of other countries.