January 2012

CLASS NOTES

1940's | 1950's | 1960's | 1970's | 1980's | 1990's | 2000's | Friends | In Memory

1930's

Donald Anderson ’33 celebrated his 100th birthday in December. A Kalamazoo native, Anderson matriculated from Kalamazoo Central High School to "K," where he graduated magna cum laude. He then attended the University of Michigan Law School before returning to Kalamazoo in 1939 to practice law. He made a significant mark on the local and state court system during his tenure as a judge and through his involvement in youth programming. From 1949 to 1961, he was Kalamazoo County's probate and juvenile court judge. He then took time off from law, becoming educational director for Children's Charter, an organization that aims to improve and standardize the treatment of children in the court system. Some of his ideas are still being used in Michigan's courts. Anderson was elected circuit court judge in 1970, serving on the bench until his retirement in 1982. Happy birthday, Donald!

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1940's

Dorothy (Chisholm) Wallace ’46 has a personal stake in a growing problem: Alzheimer's Disease. Statistics suggest that someone is diagnosed with the condition every 69 seconds, and of the leading causes of death nationwide, Alzheimer's Disease is one of the few that's growing. What's more, an estimated 15 million Americans are providing care for loved ones, and as the baby boomers age this number will only increase. "What's happening with Alzheimer's is scary," says Wallace, 87, and it's scarier for her. Her husband, Stuart Wallace '43, passed away from the disease, and research suggests that her children and grandchildren, 20 in total, may be genetically predisposed to developing it. It's a cause for concern, and Dorothy is taking action. She has worked tirelessly to raise awareness and support, becoming a team leader in the national Annual Walk to End Alzheimer's and collecting the most money of any team in the state of Georgia. She also knows the stresses that Alzheimer's places on the caregiver and the family, and so she went to the Georgia State Senate to advocate for respite care, a humane and economical alternative to nursing. This octogenarian shows no sign of resting, instead urging young people to get involved and educated. "A cure must be found," she says. Thanks in part to her efforts, we might be headed in that direction.

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1960's

Penny (Britton) Kolloff ’64 was named one of five distinguished alumni for 2011 by the Purdue University College of Education. Penny, who now lives in Eau Claire, Wis., retired in 2006 after teaching elementary and middle school and serving as a faculty member at Eastern Kentucky, Ball State, and Illinois State universities. She received a doctorate from Purdue in 1983.
Don Schmidt ’67 has received the 2011 William L. Steude Award for Ethics and Civility in Local Government given by the Michigan Municipal League (MML) and the Michigan Association of Municipal Attorneys (MAMA). The honor is bestowed on an individual for significant and tangible achievement in the field of local government ethics and civility. He was honored by MML and MAMA in 2009 with the Distinguished Municipal Attorney Award. Don is recognized as a preeminent authority on Freedom of Information and Open Meeting acts, providing training and advice to municipal attorneys and officials across the state. He received his J.D. from Wayne State University Law School and works in the Kalamazoo office of the law firm Miller Canfield.
Joel Thurtell ’67 wrote an essay about historians making good journalists that was featured on the cover of the 2011 University of Michigan History Department newsletter. He was also recently named "Journalist of the Year" by the Wayne St. University Journalism Department. And he is working on two books: a murder-mystery novel and a children's book about Morse Code. Keep up with Joel on his blog.
Bruce Haight ’68 wrote, "Forty-three years ago, in 1968, I was named a Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellow, and in my application essay I stated that my ambition was to get my doctorate and teach African history somewhere that there was a considerable cohort of first generation college students and black students. On December 31, 2011, I retired after doing just that for 41 and a half years. I never expected I would end up at Western Michigan University, but I've enjoyed it.The year before I graduated from Kalamazoo College, Ron Atkinson and I served on the search committee that hired John Wickstrom.This fall John is teaching a graduate medieval class in our department here at WMU, so we are colleagues at last. That has been a good experience too."

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1970's

Judy Sutterlin ’70 is an American Baptist International Ministries (IM) missionary in China. She recently received the Charity Award from the Jiangsu provincial government of Jiangsu Province, China. The award recognizes Judy as a "most caring and benevolent model" demonstrated through her service in the province. She was the only foreigner among the more than 30 award recipients in 2011. The award ceremony took place in the ancient capital city of Nanjing. In 2008, Judy received the Friendship Award from the Ningxia Province for her contribution to building and supporting village clinics among Muslim communities. Judy teaches general, biblical, and theological English, and serves as a liaison to Amity Foundation projects supported by IM. Judy is also an alumna of University of Wisconsin and Colgate Rochester Divinity School.
Douglas Lindsay ’73 has joined Roetzel & Andress LPA, a law firm with offices in Ohio, Florida, and Washington, D.C., following its acquisition of Chicago law firm Lewis, Overbeck & Furman, LLP, at which he worked. Douglas will be a partner in the new combined firm. Founded in 1876, Roetzel has more than 200 attorneys who provide comprehensive, integrated legal counsel in more than 40 different areas of law, and practice both nationally and internationally.
Dennis Bishop ’75 has been inducted into the Harper Creek (Mich.) High School Athletic Hall of Fame. Bishop was a three-sport star at Harper Creek (football, wrestling, track). As a Beaver, he held the school record for the high jump and earned All-State honors. In wrestling, he was a league champ. He even has an award named after him at Harper Creek: the Dennis Bishop All-American Trophy, given to a wrestler who shows high character, great attitude, and excellent competitive skills. As a Hornet, Denny was a four-year MIAA champion wrestler and a small college All-American.
John Kerr ’76 has owned Wazoo Records on South State Street in Ann Arbor since 1996. His shop--which specializes in vinyl records, cassettes, and DVDs--sits across the street from the University of Michigan "Diag."
Deborah (LaCasse) Grace ’79 has been named a 2011 Michigan Super Lawyer in Employee Benefits/ERISA. "Super Lawyers" is a listing of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. Grace has also been included in The Best Lawyers in America 2012 in the area of Employee Benefits Law. She is a member at Dickinson Wright, PLLC.

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1980's

Danny Agustin Flores ’80 has been doing research on genetically modified (GM) crop development as well as GM- and non-GM crop feed processing methods with livestock. Both research initiatives address with biotechnology the urgent need to meet food security and energy demands in the developing world. Flores' NGO/private enterprise is called Skye Blue Organization, Ltd.
Randy Hicks (M.D., M.B.A.) ’80 is co-owner and CEO of RMI, a company that provides medical radiology services to Genesee County (Mich.) and surrounding areas. Randy earned his M.D. and M.B.A from Michigan State University. He also serves as chairman of the board of directors for PPI Communications, a communications company specializing in communication solutions for physicians, and as a board member or advisor to several other companies and nonprofit organizations including HealthPlus of Michigan, a nonprofit HMO providing health care coverage to more than 200,000 members in southeast Michigan.
Christopher Rowe (M.D.) ’80 is enjoying his career as a psychiatrist in practice with his wife, Helen. Their daughter is a student at Oberlin College, and their son is in his junior year in high school.
David Abramowitz ’81 is vice president of policy and government relations at Humanity United, a foundation committed to building peace and advancing human freedom. Prior to joining Humanity, David served as chief counsel to the House Foreign Affairs Committee, where he was responsible for advising the committee on such matters as international law, international justice, and global human rights and democracy issues, including trafficking in persons and promoting democracy assistance. Prior to that, he worked at the Office of the Legal Adviser of the Department of State for 10 years on arms control, the Middle East, and legislation relating to foreign relations. He earned a J.D. degree from the University of Michigan.
Kevin Howley ’81 is running as a Democrat for the office of Oakland County Executive. He will face five-term incumbent L. Brooks Patterson. Howley earned his B.A. in economics and political science and then a worked for a couple of years with General Motors. He resumed his education and earned a M.B.A. from Harvard Business School and a Masters in Public Policy from the Harvard Kennedy School. He concentrated his work in the private sector until 2004, when he became consultant for nonprofit organizations. He has served as an interim CEO for more than a dozen nonprofits needing to build capacity and identify sustainable business models.
Leslie (Horvitz) Herschfus ’82 and her daughter are featured players in the Sky's the Limit production of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat at the West Bloomfield Jewish Community Center's Berman Theatre this month. Leslie portrays Reuben's wife, and both she and her daughter are featured in the showstopper "Go, Go Joe." Both are members of the show's choir.
Sarah Woodson ’82 was recently elected to the American Association for the Advancement of Science, one of the nation's foremost scientific organizations founded during the American Revolution by John Adams, John Hancock, and others. Woodson, a professor in the Thomas C. Jenkins Department of Biophysics at John Hopkins University's Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, was elected to the association by her peers for her significant contributions to the field of biophysical chemistry, particularly for elucidation of RNA folding pathways and structural dynamics. Woodson earned a Ph.D. at Yale University in 1987.
Amy Courter ’83 has joined VisionIT as Chief Information Officer. Headquartered in Detroit, Vision IT is a global leader in the areas of information technology consulting, managed services, staffing, and vendor management. Amy previously served as National Commander of the U.S Air Force Auxiliary Civil Air Patrol, where she commanded more than 61,000 professionals nationwide. She also served for 20 years at Valassis, a Detroit-area based public marketing services corporation, rising to the position Vice President of Information Technology and Telecommunications. Courter serves on the Kalamazoo College Board of Trustees.
Pamela (Harris) Kaiser ’83 participated in "Our Collective Wisdom: The 'K' College Class of 1983 Annual Moms Meet." The 2011 event occurred at Long Lake in Kalamazoo, Michigan, and featured, as it does every year, the four classmates (l-r): Kaiser (from Traverse City, Mich.), Shelley Glenn Prebenda (Chatham, N.J.), Kathleen Ward Moore (Battle Creek, Mich.), and Susan Davis Mowers (Grand Rapids, Mich.). The 4 K'83 Moms gather once a year for what they call a "Country Club of the Mind" weekend "to celebrate the enduring tradition of Lux esto!"
Alice (Amy) Klug ’83 owns the Old Mill of Guilford, a fully operational water-powered 18th Century grist mill and country store near Greensboro, N.C., listed on the National Register of Historical Places. Established in 1767, the mill continues to produce all-natural, stone-ground, whole grain foods, just as it has for more than 250 years. The mill produces corn meals and grits along with a wide range of mixes including sweet potato and oat bran muffin mixes, gingerbread, Scottish scones, Scottish shortbread, and a German shortbread cookie mix. Amy worked as a marketing analyst in corporate America, traveling the globe for her employers for many years. When she had children, she sought a more family-centered life, so she and husband Darrell bought the mill as a business venture close to home. Learn more about the Old Mill of Guilford.
Tom Coffey ’84 was named vice president of sales and marketing for Merchants Leasing in October. Coffey, who earned his bachelor's degree in political science, comes to the company with more than 25 years of experience in the fleet and equipment leasing industry. Before his new job, he was senior vice president of sales for Donien. He will work out of offices in Chicago and Hooksett, NH, where Merchants is based. The company provides fleet solutions and other comprehensive transportation solutions for customers across the nation.
Robert Martell (M.D., Ph.D.) ’85 has been elected to the board of directors of Curis, Inc., a drug development company in Lexington, Mass., seeking to develop new cancer treatments. Since September 2009, Martell has been employed by Tufts Medical Center, serving as both director of the Neely Center for Clinical Cancer Research (overseeing oncology clinical research) and leader of the Cancer Center's Program in Experimental Therapeutics, where he is responsible for developing the center's Phase I oncology clinical development program. He is also an associate professor of medicine at the Tufts University School of Medicine. Previously, he served as vice president and chief medical officer of the biotechnology company MethylGene, and as director of oncology global clinical research at Bristol-Myers Squibb pharmaceutical company. He received his Ph.D. degree in pharmacology from University of Michigan, and his M.D. from Wayne State University.
Suzanne (Borsum) Kamata ’87 recently published her sixth book, a short story collection titled The Beautiful One Has Come: Stories. The book is available from Wyatt-Mackenzie Publishing and concerns expatriates in various countries.
Melanie (Lee) Carey ’87 is lead pastor at Ypsilanti (Mich.) First United Methodist Church and has been named district superintendent for the Detroit metropolitan area of the UMC. Melanie has been actively involved with congregations across the country to develop ministries for Hispanics/Latinos. She recently co-authored Pentecost Journey: A Planning Guide for Non-Hispanic/Latino Congregations which is a resource for churches to develop ministries with Hispanics/Latinos. She earned her Master of Divinity degree from Union Theological Seminary in 1991. She and her husband, Jon, are the parents of two children.
Craig Tooman ’88 has joined the board of directors of InSite Vision, Inc. Craig has more than 20 years of industry experience in finance, strategic planning, and investor relations in both large and small pharmaceutical companies. He's the founder and principal of Stockbourne LLC, which provides strategic business and financial advisory services to a variety of companies. Previously, he was the senior VP of finance and CFO of Ikaria, Inc.; executive VP of finance and CFO at Enzon Pharmaceuticals; senior VP of strategic planning and corporate communications at ILEX Oncology, Inc.; and VP of investor relations at Pharmacia Corporation, the culmination of a 12-year career that started with the Upjohn Company. Tooman earned an M.B.A. in finance from the University of Chicago.

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1990's

Aaron Elstein ’91 writes about Wall Street for Crain's New York Business "in article, column, and blog form, plus two or three other ways that haven't been named yet. He's covered the game for 14 years, which, for those keeping score at home, was when the Dow Jones Industrial Average was at 5700." Aaron ended one recent column about the high number of Harvard Business School graduates going to work on Wall Street with these words: "The author is a proud graduate of Kalamazoo College and wishes all Harvard students nothing but the best, even if they lacked the foresight to attend the same school he went to."
Michael Limbert ’92 is a creative director at Goodby, Silverstein & Partners in Detroit. He's also an independent photographer who just published a new photobook, rangefound. "The images draw largely from my site, rangefound.com, and oddities from other photo assignments across the U.S. and Europe," Michael wrote.
Kristie (Everett) Zamora ’92 has been appointed by Gov. Rick Snyder to a three-year term on the Michigan Commission on Services to the Aging. Kristie lives in Flint and is the coordinator of arts, culture, and film in the Oakland County Economic Development and Community Affairs Department. She previously served as coordinator of exhibits, interim curator of education, and registrar at Flint Institute of Arts. She was a double major in art history and political science at Kalamazoo College. The MCSA is a 15-member body that advises the governor and Michigan Legislature on coordinating and administrating state programs and priorities that affect Michigan's older citizens.
Laura Milkins ’93 won the Sustainability Award and $7,000 at the Art Prize competition in Grand Rapids for Walking Home: Stories from the Desert to the Great Lakes. Laura walked from her home in Tucson, Arizona, to her mother's home in Grand Rapids and kept a live webcast and journal along the nearly 2,000-mile trek.
Monika (Gooding) Rodas ’93 and her husband, Alfred, announced the birth of their twin boys. Nathan (left) and Peter were born in January 2010.
Mark Spitznagel ’93 is the founder and chief investment officer of the hedge fund Universa Investments LP, based in Santa Monica, California.
Eric Conrad ’94 recently exhibited original drawings and sculptures at the Wonder Fair Gallery in Lawrence, Kansas. Eric is an assistant professor of art at Emporia (Kansas) State University. He earned a M.F.A. degree in painting/printmaking from the Rhode Island School of Design and has exhibited his artwork from New York to California, Hungary, and New Zealand. He's also received several grants, awards and fellowships, including a Pollock-Krasner grant, and has been artist-in-residence at several prominent institutions.
Tim Streeter ’94 and his brother, Thom, are the T Street Players, and the group released its fourth studio album this month. "Bring The Chorus" offers 12 new tracks across a variety of genres and tempos. Writes Tim: "The opening five tracks blend pop melodies with pop/rock and pop/dance beats, highlighted by the upbeat 'Always In All Ways' and 'Enjoy The Ride.' The core of the album includes a trio of ballads from the stripped down 'Live To See The Day' to the guitar-laden 'Steal With Pride,' and 'Slowly Fallin'.' And the last four tracks blend harder guitar rock with urban influences best represented in 'Release The Pain' and 'My Brick Wall.'" The album is available on iTunes, Amazon.com, and all major online music retailers. You can listen to the entire album for free.
Elizabeth (Gray) Quan ’96 wrote, "Life has been very full of late. Our son, Elijah, turned 7 recently, shortly after his grandfather (my father) passed away. I was with my dad when he died, and I knew there was no possible recovery from his illness, but it was still hard. But, God is good, and I know my dad is whole again in heaven. Life goes on, and grief is a long process, but we will survive."
Hamza Suria ’97 has been promoted to chief business officer and acting chief executive officer of AnaptysBio, a privately-held therapeutic antibody company in San Diego, Calif. Prior to joining AnaptysBio in 2008, he was at Maxygen, Diabetogen Biosciences, and Viron Therapeutics. Hamza holds a M.S. degree in immunology from University of Western Ontario and an Executive M.B.A. degree from Richard Ivey School of Business.
Jeffrey Talbert ’97 has been named a partner in the law firm Preti Talbert. He practices with the firm's Environmental, Litigation, and Climate Strategy Practice Groups based in Maine and Massachussetts. He represents clients in New England and nationally in matters involving a wide range of federal and state environmental laws in environmental litigation, permitting, compliance, and environmental aspects of corporate transactions. Talbert was awarded the Environmental Protection Agency's Gold Medal for Exceptional Service in 2010.
Rebecca Flintoft ’98 and Richard Blake welcomed their daughter, Corinne Jane, on August 24, 2011. She joins her big brother Eliot, age 2. Becca is the director of auxiliary services and housing at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, Colo.
Lee Grizzell ’98 has taken the reigns of the Wayne Memorial High School football program, becoming the school's varsity football head coach in December. Grizzell, who played four years of football at "K," is a graduate and former football player at Detroit Edsel-Ford High School. He has coached boys track and field for the past seven years at Wayne, where he has taught world history for the past decade.
Thomas "Brom" Stibitz ’98 was appointed by Michigan Governor Rick Snyder to an eight-member review team that will examine the City of Flint's finances under a newly amended and controversial emergency financial manager law. Flint is the first city to undergo the review process since Public Act 4 of 2011 was amended and became law in March 2011. Brom is senior policy adviser in the Michigan Department of Treasury. Previously, he was legislative director for Michigan House Speaker Andy Dillon and appropriations coordinator and policy analyst for the House of Representatives. He received his M.P.A. in state and local government from Northern Michigan University.
Meghan (Ray) Virro ’99 married Eric Virro on October 2, 2010, at Gramercy Mansion in Baltimore, Maryland. The wedding was a true "K" celebration given that Eric's parents, Anneliese (Schliebusch) and Olaf Virro, are members of the Kalamazoo College Class of 1966! In attendance were (l-r): Peggy Kingsley '99, Jill Sibson '99, Tatyana Matish Guifarro '99, Anneliese Virro '66, Eric and Meghan, Prathima Setty Mistry '99, Olaf Virro'66 and Lisa Bares '99. In attendance but not pictured is Jim Howard '66. Meghan wrote, "I love that family gatherings over the past few years included sharing stories of life at 'K' from very different times, especially since Anneliese was an exchange student from Bonn, Germany."

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2000's

Cullen Hendrix ’00 and his wife, Sarah Glaser, recently moved to Williamsburg, Virginia, where both have started new jobs as assistant professors at the College of William & Mary. Cullen teaches in the government department, and Sarah teaches marine science. "We recently returned from a trip to Uganda," wrote Cullen, "where we are researching the impacts of climate change and regional armed conflict on the fragile Lake Victoria ecosystem. We would love to hear from any 'K' alums that now call the Hampton Roads their home."
Khalil Ligon ’00 is the manager of Lower Eastside Action Plan (LEAP), a community-driven project in Detroit designed to engage people in a process to transform vacant land and property into uses that improve the quality of life in neighborhoods and surrounding areas. LEAP is sponsored by the Warren Conner Development Coalition and funded by The Erb Family Foundation, Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan, and Local Initiatives Support Corporation. Reach Khalil at leapdetroit@gmail.com. She was recently interviewed on television in a segment titled Rebuilding Communities.
Steven Lucas (M.D.) ’00 recently joined Wayne State University Physician Group, a multi-specialty practice group with more than 100 locations in metropolitan Detroit. Lucas, of Grosse Pointe, is trained in minimally invasive robotic and endoscopic surgery, and specializes in genitourinary cancers and tumors. He completed education and training at Rush Medical College, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and the Indiana University School of Medicine. His community involvement includes providing health care services to homeless shelters and neighborhood clinics.
Stacey (Nastase) Lambert ’02 and her husband, Chad, welcomed their first child into the world. Tyler Samuel Lambert was born on August 30, 2011, at eight pounds and 21 inches. He's welcomed by a busy family. Stacey wrote: "We have three dogs--two Weimaraners, Kobe and Kase, and a Black Lab, Arnie, who are loving Tyler right along with us. It's so fun!"
Diana Okuniewski-Schillaci (D.O.) ’02 recently joined York Hospital OB/GYN, Surgical & Midwifery Associates, in York, Maine. Okuniewski received her D.O. from Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine. She completed her residency, with her final year as chief resident, in Obstetrics & Gynecology at Ingham Regional Medical Center, Michigan State University. She is an advocate for physician/midwife partnerships.
Lauren Trible-Laucht ’02 is the new city attorney for Traverse City, Michigan. Previously, she was assistant city attorney for the City of Clawson. Lauren earned her J.D. degree at Wayne State University Law School. Prior to pursuing her law degree she worked as a translator in the pharmaceutical industry.
Lisa Findley ’05 has a new blog about travel, social justice, and pop culture called Stowaway! Features include: My Kind of Town Monday (photos of different places in Chicago, where she lives), Aesthetically Speaking (series of interviews with artists), and Where in the World Wednesday (photos from her travels). Her "Aesthetically Speaking" entry on Sept. 6, 2011, featured an interview with San Francisco-based artist Kelsey Myers '05.
Joseph Maher ’05 has joined the family law firm of Weinberg and Schwartz LLC, in Columbia, Maryland, as an associate. He is a 2010 graduate of the University of Baltimore School of Law and previously served as the law clerk for the Honorable Louis A. Baker for the Circuit Court for Howard County.
Rachel (Sherman) Xoconostle ’05 wrote, "October marked my fifth anniversary working as a research biochemist for Merck in the Vaccine Basic Research division. I had also been working part-time toward my M.S. in chemistry through Lehigh University and graduated in May after completion of my thesis studying the antibody response to a potential component of a herpes simplex virus vaccine. The very best news of all, though, is that in July my husband Agustin Xoconostle and I were married! The ceremony and reception took place in the chapel and courtyard at his family's hacienda (near Tulancingo, Mexico), which was built in the 1600s and has been passed down for generations. We were thrilled that my family (including my father, Charles Sherman '77) and fellow Class of 2005 alums Elizabeth Davis, Megan Erskine, Carrie VanDerZee, and Rebecca Tonietto were able to travel to join us for the Mexican wedding festivities."
Laura Kennedy ’06 has accepted a teaching position at Korea University's Institute of Foreign Language Studies. For the past three years she has worked with the Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Program in Pohang, South Korea. She moved to Seoul and began teaching at Korea University in February.
Amy Passiak ’06 recently received her Master in Museum Studies degree from New York University. She is working on a project to distribute steel and other artifacts associated with the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center for use in public memorials across the United States and in nine countries. She also works in her company, Art Preservation Services, to develop and implement new monitoring systems for museum environments.
Joey Arce ’07 is the new swim coach for the Woodstock/Woodstock North (Ill.) co-op girls swimming team. He was a four-year varsity swimmer at "K" and an assistant swim coach after graduation.
Hannah (O'Reilly) Malyn ’07 became a development associate at College Art Association (CAA). Previously, she assisted the development and marketing associate at Hester Street Collaborative while completing her master's degree in visual arts administration at New York University, where her thesis explored the advent of populist audience development tactics in art museums. She earned her B.A. in economics/business and studio art at "K." As an artist, Malyn is mostly interested in the human form; her undergraduate senior solo exhibition, "Re-Conceptions: Women in Art," explored the role of women in the art world through a series of watercolor figure studies. She also works in oil and charcoal. CAA is a New York City-based organization with more than 12,000 artists, art historians, scholars, curators, critics, collectors, educators, publishers, and other professionals in the visual arts as individual members. Another 2,000 departments of art and art history in colleges and universities, art schools, museums, libraries, and professional and commercial organizations hold institutional memberships. CAA promotes excellence in scholarship and teaching in the history and criticism of the visual arts, and it promotes creativity and technical skill in the teaching and practices of art.
Sally (Warner) Read ’08 and Courtney Read '06 were married on August 20, 2011, at Stetson Chapel. A reception followed in the Hicks Center banquet hall. Sally and Courtney were joined by their family and friends, including other "K" alumni: Cynthia (Read) Miller '74, Becky Warner '04, Charles and Elizabeth (Brayman) Fulton '05, Mike Ruprich '06, and Mary Atallah '08.
Rachel Udow ’08 Rachel Udow '08 is a grant writer for Migrant Health Promotion in Weslaco, Texas. She also performs original folk music--including body drumming--and invites "K" folks in the Rio Grande Valley to take in one of her sets at Carino's Italian Restaurant in McAllen, Texas.
Ryan Booms ’09 showed his independent film Lake Village at the East Lansing Film Festival in November 2011. His film profiles a farm cooperative in Kalamazoo and was produced as his SIP at Kalamazoo College. Ryan has been serving in Teach for America.
Elizabeth (Porter) Ettenger ’09 and George Ettenger '07 were married on September 25, 2011. The couple were surrounded by their Kalamazoo College pals (l-r): Rob Conner '07, Kelly Housel '07, Ian Haight '07, Whitney Nielsen '07, Dave Klements '07, George and Elizabeth, Juli Scalf '09, Kira Dow '09, Derek Gianino '09, and Colin Myers '07.

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2010's

Elyse (Durham) Buffenbarger ’10 recently married Bryce Buffenbarger. The couple live in Kalamazoo. Elyse works with at-risk students at Kalamazoo Valley Community College; Bryce is a graduate student completing his master's degree at Western Michigan University.
Barret (Myers) Wolfson ’10 and Elliot Wolfson '10 were married on August 6, 2011. They met as LandSea participants in 2006 and were engaged four years later, shortly after graduating with majors in biology. They celebrated their wedding in Rochester, Minnesota, with friends and family. Kalamazoo College Class of 2010 alumni present at the wedding included Ian Harbage, Laura Marshall, Lizzy Haworth-Hoeppner, Nic Helstetter, Jessica Priebe, Sean Bennett, and Teofil Wahr.
Kate Christman ’11 has joined the Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC) Northwest. She will spend one year with Family Support Network in Billings, Montana. Established in 1956, JVC Northwest recruits, places, and supports volunteers living in communities across the states of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington. Volunteers work with more than 100 partner agencies advocating for refugees, nursing in community clinics, teaching in schools on Native American Reservations, assisting in shelters, organizing community garden projects, and doing other important work. Throughout their year of service, JVs focus on four core values--social and ecological justice, simple living, spirituality, and community.
Rebecca Dennis ’11 is an intern with the InterAct Theatre Company in Philadelphia for the next year. Her twin sister, Stephanie, helped her move from the Detroit area and, while in Philadelphia, interviewed for a job at a public relations agency there. A few days later, Stephanie got the job, packed up her belongings, and joined Becky in the City of Brotherly (and now Sisterly) Love.

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In Memory

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1940's

Robert John Malnight ’40 died November 16, 2011, at age 93. Malnight served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He was an avid golfer and was proprietor of Malnight's Bakery in Kalamazoo until his retirement at age 83. Survivors include his son Richard Malnight '88.
Rosemary (Allen) Mueller ’43 died September 21, 2011. She was 89. Formerly of Lakewood, Michigan, she lived in Charlevoix and was active in Lakewood Congregational Church, Lakewood Schools booster organizations, Lakewood Hospital Auxiliary, the Lighthouse Preservation Committee, and the Charlevoix Area Hospital Foundation.
Shirley (White) Soukup (Ph.D.) ’45 died on December 15, 2011. At Kalamazoo College she majored in biology and chemistry and earned a minor in philosophy. During her undergraduate years she worked at the The Upjohn Company in the laboratory of Dr. David Weisblatt, who once remarked that Shirley was the brightest student with whom he'd ever worked. She worked with chemistry professor and tennis coach Allen Stowe on the preliminary design of Stowe Stadium. It was at "K" that Shirley met her future husband, Victor Soukup, who attended the College and graduated from the University of Michigan. Shirley graduated as valedictorian of the Class of 1945, and after the end of World War II she and Victor married and continued their education at the University of Wisconsin. There, Shirley earned her doctorate in endocrinology. She was passionate about research and spent her entire career at the Children's Hospital/Children's Research Foundation/Center for Developmental Studies where she worked with Joseph Warkany, one of the foremost scientists in the field of mammalian teratology and cytogenetics. Shirley's work with chromosomes resulted in many publications, and she served as a full professor at the Medical School of the University of Cincinnati. She mentored many students and doctoral candidates. She cared deeply about the environment and conservation issues and was active for many years in the Cincinnati and Ohio Wildflower Society. Shirley is survived by her husband of 65 years, Victor, a daughter and three sons, eight grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. Two grandsons--Andrew Dombos '07 and Alex Dombos '12--are (or soon will be) alumni of Kalamazoo College.

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1950's

William Cox ’51 died Sept. 14, 2011, in Kalamazoo, near his home in Oshtemo. Cox served in the U.S. Army during World War II and was honorably discharged. He loved music, singing, dancing, traveling, wood working, bird watching, tennis, golf, a good glass of wine, Civic Readers Theater, and Western Michigan University sports.
John Leddy ’51 died on January 4, 2012, at age 82. He was a retired senior partner in the Philadelphia law firm of Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis and played a key role in trial litigation, contract negotiation, and other legal matters concerning company management and labor unions. He matriculated to "K" from Brooklyn, New York. During his four years here he was a member of Phi Kappa Alpha, a Student Senate representative, editor of Index, treasurer for Century Forum, and a participant in intramural basketball and football. He earned his J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School (1954) and served in the U.S. Navy from 1955 to 1958. He was an avid sports fan and season ticket holder for the Eagles, Flyers, and Phillies. He also loved jazz, comedy, gardening, dogs, and the arts.
Ronald Wightman ’53 of Fishers, Indiana, died October 13, 2011, in Indianapolis. He was 80. Ronald was retired and had been co-owner of Insurance Market Place. He served his country with the U.S. Air Force.
Gary MacMillan ’54 died in December, 2011. He matriculated to "K" from Posen, Michigan, and majored in psychology and sociology. He was a member of Phi Lambda, the International Relations Club, and the French Club, and he served on the staff of Index and Boiling Pot. He was president of the Psychology Club and worked for the College's radio station, WJMD. During his career he worked as a librarian and lived in Hawaii for many years. He spent his last years in Nordland, Washington.
Gretchen (Bahr) Frueh ’56 died on December 31, 2011. She had lived with lung cancer for more than four years with a deep faith, dignity, grace, and unconditional love. Gretchen matriculated to Kalamazoo College from Waukesha, Wisconsin, and earned her B.A. in English. At "K" she was active in many organizations, including Alpha Lambda Delta, College Singers, Kappa Pi, Inter-Society Council, Board of Religious Affairs, Trowbridge House Council, Bach Festival Chorus, and Student Senate, to name a few. She served as secretary for the Junior Class and president of Women's League, and she was elected to the May Fete and Homecoming Courts. She also was a Resident Assistant in Mary Trowbridge House. She and classmate John Frueh married in December of 1956. Gretchen earned her Master of Social Work degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She worked in geriatric and medical social work, including hospice. She was a lifelong member of the Philanthropic Educational Organization, a group founded by women in the 19th century that today has more than a quarter million members supporting its mission to promote educational opportunities for women. Gretchen was president of the Pennsylvania State Chapter of P.E.O. and a charter member of four P.E.O. chapters in different cities where she lived. She was a charter member of Peace Presbyterian Church (Lakewood Ranch, Florida). She served as a Presbyterian deacon and elder in various churches and was a leader in starting Stephen Ministry programs at churches in Pittsburgh, St. Petersburg, and Lakewood Ranch. Gretchen is survived by her husband, two children, and four grandchildren.
David R. White ’58 died Sept. 19, 2011. David was a lifetime resident of Southwest Michigan who owned and operated White Sales Corporation until his retirement. Among his survivors is his sister, Joan M. White '58.
Robert Harold Yuell ’58 died October 30, 2011, after a lengthy illness at age 74. Bob was a resident of West Windsor, N.J., and spent virtually his entire life in central New Jersey, except for his years at "K" where he played on the 1956 Hornet tennis team that was inducted into the College's Athletic Hall of Fame. He retired in 1994 after 34 years as a computer professional with Johnson & Johnson. He was also an avid sports car rally enthusiast, a serious postcard and coin collector, and very active in the Plainsboro Historical Society and Museum, serving as its executive director for seven years.
Marta Gulbis ’59 died October 10, 2011, in Kalamazoo. She was 90. Born in Jumurda, Latvia, Marta moved to the United States as a young woman. She earned a pharmacy degree from University of Michigan and worked as a pharmacist for the Warner Lambert Pharmaceutical Company for 27 years.
Thomas Harding ’59 died September 26, 2011. He played football at "K," later transferred, and graduated from North Texas State University. After college he served six months in the Army and seven years in the reserves. He went to work for his father at Harding's Friendly Markets in 1961 and remained with the company until his death, working in positions from bagger and stocker to owner. He was an avid golfer, car collector, and devoted family man.

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1960's

Eugene Martin ’64 died November 9, 2011. After graduate work at Syracuse University, Gene entered the Foreign Service. During 34 years as a diplomat, he served in Hong Kong, Burma, Taiwan, the Philippines, China, and Washington, D.C. He retired in 2000 as Deputy Chief of Mission in Beijing. Following retirement, Gene taught China and Northeast Asia area studies at the Foreign Service Institute. He subsequently joined the United States Institute of Peace as executive director of the Philippine Facilitation Project, which sought to promote peace talks between the Philippine government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front in Mindanao. He was the director of the Washington Office of the Johns Hopkins-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies in China (2008 to 2009), and visiting scholar in Southeast Asian studies at the School of Advanced International Studies of Johns Hopkins University, as well as a frequent lecturer on East and Southeast Asian issues.

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1970's

Trond Bjornard ’71 died unexpectedly of a heart attack on Oct. 31, 2011, in Idaho Falls, Idaho, at age 63. He served in the U.S. Army, earned master's and Ph.D. degrees in nuclear physics from MIT, and worked as a nuclear physicist, licensed merchant marine captain, music composer, and recording artist. He was also a paraglider, sailplane pilot, a deep-sea fishing guide in the Pacific Ocean, and an instructor in the Sea of Abacos, Bahamas, for the Boy Scouts of America. In 2004, Bjornard accepted a position with Idaho National Laboratory, where he engaged in research and technical counsel for the U.S. Department of Energy and International Atomic Energy Agency, applying his international nuclear energy expertise to nonproliferation challenges.

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1980's

Judith (Ohles) Kooistra ’83 died December 8, 2011. A native of Cortland, New York, Kooistra earned her B.A. in religion and studied abroad in Aix-en-Provence, France. She received a Masters of Library Science degree from Kent State University. She worked as a collection development librarian and associate professor of libraries and media services at Kent State and was also an active member of John Knox Presbyterian Church, in North Canton, Ohio. A lover of writing and blogging, Kooistra was especially supportive of those who had been stricken with breast cancer, and she worked tirelessly on fundraising to support research to fight the disease. She was especially passionate about international adoption, and she adopted her son, Nate, from Vietnam in 2002.

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Friends

Robert Grossman died on January 7, 2012. He was professor of psychology and one of the architects of the Kalamazoo College psychology major, and he was a mentor and source of support for his fellow faculty and countless students. He cared deeply about his students and was justifiably proud of how hard he worked to improve as a teacher. Bob was born in Ludington, Michigan (May 10, 1943) and grew up in Midland, Michigan. He was football player for Midland High School and developed a deep love of athletics. He attended Michigan State University and earned a B.A. in sociology and a master's degree in student personnel. At MSU he met Sue Russell on a blind date. They fell in love, dated throughout their college years, and married on August 6, 1968. The couple moved to Warren, Michigan, where Bob taught sociology at Macomb Community College for three years. He became interested in clinical psychology and earned his Ph.D. in that subject from MSU. He worked at the Kalamazoo Psychiatric Hospital from 1972 to 1975, the year he started his teaching duties at Kalamazoo College. He taught clinical psychology, sports psychology, and general psychology during his 35 years of teaching at Kalamazoo College, and he was well respected and beloved by students and faculty. For many of those years, until 1995, he also maintained a private clinical psychology practice that specialized in both adult and adolescent mental health. In 2004, Bob received the Florence J. Lucasse Fellowship for Excellence in Teaching, the faculty's highest honor, and it meant a great deal to him. In his acceptance speech, titled "Not a Born Teacher," he cited how hard he had to work in order to become a good teacher. That evening he said, "the most dramatic improvement in my teaching occurred when, in addition to teaching the content of psychology, I began to make efforts to explicitly address and foster the epistemological development of my students [with] a new emphasis on breaking down dualistic thinking and [fostering] the ability to distinguish between evidence and inference...." The objective of good teaching, he added, was to help make "students deeper reflective thinkers, young people who are more personally involved in learning," who would know how to apply their knowledge to their lives. On the occasion of that award, his colleague, Professor of Psychology Bob Batsell, described him as "a consummate teacher who reminds us all--students and colleagues alike--that good teachers never stop learning, adapting, and growing." Bob's surviving family members include his wife of 43 years, Sue; two children, Kurt Grossman and Liz Grossman, and his beloved granddaughter, Lily Grossman.
James Ingersoll died November 14, 2011, at his Largo, Florida, home. He was 93. Ingersoll was an emeritus trustee of the College, serving 1981 to 1990. He worked for Borg Warner Corporation of Chicago for many years, taking a three-year leave of absence to serve with the U.S. government in the Philippines. He was a World War II Navy veteran and collected antique automobiles as a hobby.
Colleen Thor died on Tuesday, October 11, 2011. She was 85 years old and lived in Plainwell, Michigan. Colleen graduated from Wittenberg College in Springfield, Ohio, in 1948 with a B.A. degree in art. She served as an administrative assistant in the College's fine arts programs for 12 years, retiring in 1987. After that she owned a second-hand store for 15 years. In her spare time she enjoyed painting, drawing, sewing, crafting, and playing bridge. In her later years, Colleen compiled her memoirs into a book-length document, based on a journal she maintained her entire life.
Albert John Todd (Jr.) a longtime friend of Kalamazoo College, died peacefully at his Vero Beach, Florida, home on October 23, 2011, at age 99. Todd was an important early supporter of efforts to make the USTA Boys Nationals Tennis Tournament an annual summer event at Kalamazoo College. Known for his integrity and for being warm and gregarious, he sat on the boards of several Kalamazoo area banks and served with many civic groups in Kalamazoo and Indian River Shores, Florida. He moved to Florida permanently from Kalamazoo upon his retirement in 1977 as president of the A.M. Todd Company, the global mint essential oils business established by his grandfather in 1869.

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