May 2010

CLASS NOTES

1940's | 1950's | 1960's | 1970's | 1980's | 1990's | 2000's | Friends | In Memory

1950's

Bob Dye ’51 released his first novel Humble Honest Men (Watermark Publishing) in May 2009. A dozen years in the writing, the book tells the story of Kapala Dolan, a native of Hawaii who moves to Kinsale, Ireland. He soon becomes embroiled in the historical controversy surrounding the sinking of the Lusitania and her mysterious cargo. The book is a tale of two cultures based on the fascinating similarities between Hawaii and Ireland. Dye's late wife, Tessa, suggested writing a novel to help pass the time in sleepy Kinsale, where the family has kept a home. Dye is a celebrated author-historian in Honolulu, his current residence. He is the author of Merchant Prince of the Sandalwood Mountains: Afong and the Chinese in Hawaii and is a frequent contributor to Honolulu Magazine. He edited three volumes of Hawaii Chronicles and wrote an occasional political column for the Honolulu Advertiser. Humble Honest Men is available at bookstores or directly from the publisher online. Postscript: At the time this issue of BeLight was being produced, Dye passed way from cancer. His obituary is included in this issue.

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1960's

Rosemary DeHoog ’60 , women's tennis coach at Le Moyne College, was honored by Syracuse University and the Big East Conference as part of the celebration of National Girls and Women in Sports Day. DeHoog served as the tennis coordinator at Syracuse University from 1978 to her retirement in 2004, helping more than 150 students every semester to improve their tennis skills. She also served as the head tennis professional at Drumlins Tennis Club, and in that capacity provided private tennis lessons to all age groups, from pee-wees to seniors. DeHoog was an outstanding Hornet tennis player (four-time MIAA champion) and is only the 13th woman in the United States Professional Tennis Association to attain master professional certification. The National Girls and Women in Sports Day began in 1987 and honors women in all 50 states for their positive influence in sports participation and women's equality in athletics.
David Clark ’62 retired from the faculty of the College of Medicine at Ohio State University. He has returned to work part time, teaching neuro-anatomy to first year medical students and a graduate course in human embryology. David and co-authors N. Boutros (Wayne State University) and M. Mendez (UCLA) recently completed the 3rd edition of their book Brain and Behavior. The book is used as the basis of their CME course of the same name, offered this year at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association in New Orleans. Clark is looking forward to this summer for time to play with his grandchildren, sail with friends on Lake Erie, and travel with his wife, Jane. Email clark.32@osu.edu
George Drake ’69 was named Dream Team Medical Director for the State of Michigan, an honor bestowed by the Michigan Hospice and Palliative Care Association. The award recognizes excellence in care of persons with life-limiting illnesses, vision in the area of end-of-life care, and team leadership. Drake is the medical director of the St. Joseph-based Hospice at Home. He is passionate about end-of-life care and the value of teamwork in caring for each individual physically, emotionally, and spiritually. An article on his work appeared in the Spring 2010 LuxEsto.

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1970's

David Harrison ’70 was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award at Washington Governor Chris Gregoire's 2009 Workforce and Economic Development Conference. Harrison is a senior lecturer at the Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs at the University of Washington. He is founder and coordinator of Strategies to Eliminate Poverty, a grant-making program seeking to reduce the extent and severity of poverty in the Northwest. He also is the immediate past chair of the Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board. He is known for both his policy work and for his hands-on organizing. He helped create Community Voice Mail so that homeless and phoneless persons can stay connected. He helped launch SkillUp Washington, which helps low income under-skilled working adults acquire post-high school educational credentials. He's helped many other advocates and organizations in their work against poverty. During his tenure as chair of the Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board (a post to which he was appointed by Governor Gary Locke and reappointed by Gregoire) the Board and its partners advanced and strengthened new strategies in the areas of dropout prevention; high demand capacity in community colleges; access to career and technical education for high school students; and the development of I-BEST, an educational model that blends job skills and academic skills. At his commencement in 1970 Harrison was awarded Kalamazoo College's "Citizenship Award." To this day he continues to admirably fulfill his commitment to effective and conscientious governance.
David Thoms ’70 has been appointed to the board of directors of Greenleaf Trust, the independent Michigan-chartered trust-only bank. Thoms is a principal at Miller Canfield's Troy (Mich.) office. He concentrates his practice in estate planning and tax, non-profit organizations, business entity planning and tax, succession planning, and real estate.
John Deupree ’73 has been named the executive director of the American International Recruitment Council. AIRC is a 501c3 standards organization and membership association that provides certification for international agencies as well as professional development for U.S. colleges and universities engaged in international student recruitment and placement.
Doug Knobloch ’74 will retire as Schoolcraft (Mich.) Community Schools Superintendent at the end of the 2010-11 academic year. It will conclude a 36-year career in public education. Knobloch started as a social sciences teacher at Schoolcraft Middle School. He coached basketball and served as athletic director. He left Schoolcraft in 1986 to become an assistant principal and athletic director at Mattawan High School. He later served as Mattawan High School principal. He returned to Schoolcraft as the middle school principal in 1994 and served in that position until he became superintendent in 2004.
Kurt Roscow ’78 was recently hired by Dave Preston, Ph.D., the CEO of rapidly growing Safety in Motion, Inc., "to do some sales training and enjoy a fun time catching up in Portland, Ore," wrote Kurt (pictured, at left, with Dave). He quipped, "After years of watching me talk my way through the 'K' experience, Dave vowed that whenever he ran a company, he would need me to impart my slippery sales skills to his organization."

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1980's

Mary Alice (Ploughman) Bowe ’81 , her husband, Peter, and Peter's sister, Sara, were honored by the Saline (Mich.) Area Chamber of Commerce for their numerous charitable endeavors within Saline and Washtenaw County. Among other projects, they sponsor the Circle of Art program, which raises money for a local food bank by collecting artwork to be auctioned. The trio own Saline Picture Frame Company, located in Saline and Dexter.
Ed Hill ’81 was recently promoted to senior vice president of service operations at CarMax, the nation's largest retailer of used cars. Hill has been with the company since 1995. He works at the company's headquarters in Richmond, Virginia.
Chris Davis ’82 is chairman of the science department at Franklin High School in New Jersey. He has been teaching physics there for nearly 28 years, and he still loves it. He has added girl's soccer to his coaching repertoire. Davis and his wife (and classmate), Teresa Stevens, are anticipating a soon-to-be empty nest. Email cdavis@franklinboe.org
Teresa Stevens ’82 is celebrating: three years cancer-free; the big "Five-Oh;" and a new career as a book editor for the nation's first Native American woman-owned publishing house, Wampum Books. Teresa's first title with Wampum, Poneasequa,Goddess of the Waters, recently won a Mom's Choice Award. In other family news, Teresa's daughter Cate earned her M.F.A. in fiction, and son Edward will graduate high school and head for culinary school next fall. Email stevensteresa50@verizon.net
Chris Tucker ’82 celebrated his 50th birthday on March 28, 2010. What better way that with a surprise party with fellow "K" graduates. Party goers included (l-r): Sue Hensler Orlikowski '82, Mark Orlikowski '82, Chris Shiemke '82, Debbie Tilbury Shiemke '82, Chris Tucker '82, and Natalie Tucker '05.
Randall Forsch (M.D., MPH) ’83 works in the department of family medicine at the University of Michigan. About his daughter's upcoming graduation from Kalamazoo College he wrote, "My daughter Margaux graduates from 'K' this spring with a double major in Biology and Art History. While on holiday with my youngest son, Nick, in Madrid, I pondered my experiences at 'K' and now my daughter's as she prepares to graduate and 'move on.' The result was a poem I wrote titled 'Two Cultures Redux.'" [That poem is published below and will be published in the Fall 2010 issue of LuxEsto.] "I was lucky enough to be both a Heyl and Diebold scholar with a major in Biology. Margaux has had similar experiences. We both loved our college years and the influence of a true liberal arts education including foreign study (I was in Hannover, Margaux in Quito) and SIPs that helped with career choice. I believe the education and experiences that Kalamazoo College offers its students give them the opportunity to truly be renaissance people and to bridge the chasm between, on the one hand, the culture of science and, on the other hand, the culture of the humanities. C. P. Snow wrote about that chasm and his thinking on that issue was the theme of my freshman orientation. Kalamazoo College has helped create this woman of both cultures, my daughter Margaux Alexandria Forsch."

Two Cultures Redux

Ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny.

- Ernst Haeckel

Two households, both alike in dignity
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene.
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.


- Wm. Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, Act I: prologue




Science and the Humanities, the two cultures
K'83 orientation themed for us freshmen.
Two mountains, each Snow capped
With an uncrossable chasm between.
Show us the new truth and advance, or,
Have traditional faith and be creative.

So much would be possible, be gracious, be beautiful
If a Bridge was somehow raised.

You learned the Bard's words in high school
Reciting them at dinner until perfect.
We did not know then, in 2010
You would unite the households
With Biology and Art History
As you crossed the Kalamazoo stage.

So much is possible, is gracious, is beautiful
When the Bridge is raised by you, Margaux.

Email rforsch@umich.edu
Gary Koehler ’83 is back in grad school at the University of California-San Francisco, studying global health sciences. "In Spring 2010 I will be working on my thesis project in Tanzania," Koehler wrote, "developing clinical/educational relationships with the Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences in Dar es Salaam and the health district in Bagamoyo. I will be finishing my degree in Summer 2010." Email gwkoehler@aol.com
Mark Abeles-Allison ’84 has donated to Kalamazoo College's Upjohn Library a limited edition copy of Federico Garcia Lorca's Romancero Gitano, with illustrations by Rafael Alberti. It is #116 of an edition of 1500 and is signed by Alberti. During his study abroad program in Madrid, the family with whom Mark stayed was in the publishing business, with this edition as one of their publications. Number 116 was a gift to Mark upon his departure.
Lance Garmer ’84 wrote, "Just a quick shout out to the old gang. I've been listening to a lot of Bach lately as well as playing lots of guitar, piano, and flute. Recent travels to Istanbul and Egypt; but the crowning glory was attendance at an intensive summer course in Icelandic at the University of Iceland (where I hope to teach in the not-so-distant future). Gigged for five years as a philosophy prof in Krakow and NYC, but nowadays I earn my keep (which is not to be confused with what I am) from translating, writing, and editing for the UN. Still trying to push boundaries of all sorts, including at the gym. Very healthy and strong in mind, body, spirit, and enjoying Act Three of Life. May you all be doing at least as well."
Nancy Reye ’87 wrote, "My husband and I are moving this summer to Bloomington, Indiana, in pursuit of new career opportunities. We are leaving Michigan behind and will be located near Indiana University, where I will be a family physician, employed by Bloomington Hospital. We are sad to be leaving Michigan but are excited for the new opportunities and warmer weather. However, our two sons are not too sure what a Hoosier is. Email reyedolinka@gmail.com
Russell Cooper ’89 and Amy Clement '96 welcomed their first child, Violette ('31?), in early April 2009.
Brian Libby ’89 is one of 80 new Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellows. The program, which received White House recognition this year and will expand from Indiana to Michigan next year, is designed to recruit outstanding candidates to the teaching profession and to transform teacher preparation. Libby will receive a $30,000 stipend and enroll in a master's degree program (University of Indianapolis) that provides intensive preparation for teaching math and science in the urban and rural high schools that most need strong teachers. In return he will commit to teach for three years in high-need Indiana schools. Libby is a published chemist responsible for several patents. He worked for several years at Eli Lilly, Inc. The Teaching Fellowship program is sponsored by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. The Foundation welcomes applications from across the Kalamazoo College community--including both current students and alumni--for next year's competition for the W.K. Kellogg Foundation's Woodrow Wilson Michigan Teaching Fellowships, as well as the related Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowship programs in Indiana and Ohio. The application period begins in June.

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1990's

Alice (Smith) Edington ’90 wrote, "Twenty years! Talk about the blink of an eye. Hope everyone is coming to Homecoming. Please let me know which pals will be coming: Alice@tilemartmichigan.com."
Maggie Catchick ’91 wrote, "Many changes in the last year! I am now divorced but very happy with my new significant other, Kevin Houghton, and sharing time with my two kids with their father. I published a collection of my poems last spring, and that has been going well. Still teaching in Cheboygan (Mich.) and would love to hear from any of you!" And about that book, her first: It is a collection of 17 poems titled Truth in Shadows. She has been writing poetry since she was in high school, and this collection represents writing from the last 15 years. Wrote Catchick: "The book is a collection of personal poems that explores the dual lives we all lead as we battle for balance between our public lives and private lives." Catchick teaches French and English. Her poetry has appeared in Ann Arbor's White Crow, Bear River Review and Northern Stars magazines. Her work has been honored by the Sky Blue Waters Poetry League and has won other awards as well. Email maggiecat310@live.com
Donald Kahaian ’91 was inducted into the 2010 Quincy (Mich.) High School Athletic Hall of Fame. In high school Kahaian received 14 varsity letters in football, wrestling, baseball, and track. At "K" he played football and baseball.
Daniel Boecher ’92 was promoted to assistant vice president at First State Bank in Elkhart, Ind. He is responsible for development of lending activity for new and existing business customers.
Jacob Corvidae ’92 Green Programs Manager for WARM Training Center, oversees WARM's Green Building Demonstration Center. WARM was named a 2010 Michigan Green Leader by the Detroit Free Press. Corvidae, as an individual, received a MI Earth Day Award for his work at WARM. Corvidae provides seminars and consulting on energy efficiency, green building, and renewable energy. He has authored a variety of reports and guides on those subjects. He is also a professor of sustainable design at University Detroit Mercy School of Architecture. Corvidae has been working with grassroots groups on sustainable development since 1998. He is a co-founder of Sustainable Detroit and the Urban Ecovillage Network. He has studied integral theory and sustainable development at the Integral Institute. Corvidae is a member of the Kalamazoo College Sustainability Guild and has hosted "K" student interns at his work.
Doug Ferguson ’92 and Kate Husband '92 are finishing up two years in Zambia with the Foreign Service and will return to Michigan in July for a short break before their next assignment--a three-year tour in Berlin. Email osmr2snakes@hotmail.com
Julie Mehretu ’92 was honored at an annual dinner benefiting the nonprofit Grabhorn Institute in San Francisco. Grabhorn was formed in 2000 in order to preserve and perpetuate the use of the one of the last integrated type-foundry, letterpress printing, and bookbinding facilities in the United States. Grabhorn owns Arion Press. Mehretu is illustrating an Arion edition of Sappho's poetry, to be published in Greek and English. In other news, her exhibition "Grey Area" opens at the Guggenheim Museum in New York this month and runs through October 6.
Gary Nelund ’92 was elected Mayor of Norton Shores (Mich.) on November 3, 2009, and was sworn into office on November 9. Norton Shores is the second largest city in Muskegon County and the 10th largest municipality in West Michigan. Between his business, two small children, and the Mayor's office, Nelund keeps very busy. Email ganelund@msn.com
Lew Miller ’93 was selected a member of the U.S. Italia Cup Tennis Team for men 35 and older. He represented the United States at the 30th ITF Senior World Team Championships (March 29 through April 3) hosted by Federation Mexicana de Tenis. Miller was one of a four-man team selected to play by the USTA from the top American players in his age division. He also paired up to form the top doubles team representing the U.S. Miller is currently one of the top ranked players nationally in the Men's 35 and over category. The Senior World Team Championships is sponsored annually by the International Tennis Federation. This year is the second time Miller has been included on the Italia Cup Team.
Genna Gent ’94 has been named vice president of state and local affairs for the American Beverage Association, a trade association representing the broad spectrum of companies that manufacture and distribute non-alcoholic beverages in the United States. Gent will be responsible for representing the interests of ABA members before state legislatures and regulatory bodies. She has more than a decade of experience in state government relations and most recently served as deputy chief of staff and Washington office director for Michigan Governor Jennifer M. Granholm.
Peter Avis ’95 is an assistant professor of biology at Indiana University Northwest. He's also studying the effects of pollution on the relationship between trees and "root mutualists," fungi that attach themselves to roots and trade nutrients with the host plant. Imbalances in an ecosystem can reveal themselves through changes in such fungal-plant coexistence. He is conducting his research in Miller Woods, a stretch of national parkland located next to the steel mills of Gary, Ind. Avis is well aware of the ill effects of industrial pollution, but he also notes the irony that the proximity of the mills likely saved Miller Woods from residential and commercial development. His work is featured on the IU Northwest website.
Jeffrey Lund ’95 is now a partner in the law firm of Yoder Ainlay Ulmer & Buckingham in Goshen, Indiana. Jeff was a Hanns-Seidel Fellow at the Freie Universitšt Berlin in Germany from 1995 to 1997, and he received his juris doctorate, cum laude, from the Valparaiso University School of Law in 2000. He concentrates in general trial practice, focusing on commercial litigation and employment law.
Karen Reed ’97 and her husband, Michael Ejercito, were very excited to welcome their second daughter, Felicity Reed Ejercito, into the world on Mother's Day, 2009. "Big sister Sierra was happy to greet Felicity," wrote Karen. "I continue my work as a family physician serving the uninsured population in Beloit, Wisconsin. Although my family is very busy, we do get to continue traveling to new and familiar places."
Mellany Flynn ’99 married (John) Lee Rowton in Ocho Rios, Jamaica, on April 9, 2010. They live in Little Rock, Arkansas. Mellany is a clinical psychologist and psychology internship training director at Arkansas State Hospital. Lee is a pharmacist in the V.A. Hospital. Email goldengirl877@yahoo.com
Damon McCord ’99 has been named co-director of the Metropolitan Expeditionary Learning School in Queens, New York City. The grades 6-12 school, which will open in September 2010 will be operated by New York City Outward Bound. It will offer students a rigorous college preparatory program with emphasis on science and technology. McCord has been assistant principal for administration at The Bronx School for Law, Government and Justice for six years. Before that he was dean of students at the Edward A. Reynolds West Side High School. Earlier in his career he was a classroom teacher in Flint, Michigan, and New York City.
Andrew Terranella ’99 completed his interviewing with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and received his assignment. He'll be working in the Epidemiological Investigation Service out of Atlanta. His work will focus on meningitis and whooping cough diseases worldwide.

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2000's

John Cunningham ’00 is a research editor specializing in arts and culture at Encyclopaedia Britannica in Chicago. He also creates the monthly crossword puzzle for local retailer Marbles: The Brain Store. Two of his puzzles will appear in a book of literary-themed crosswords published by Penguin in 2011. Email jmcunning@gmail.com
Kevin Harper ’00 and Stella (Guo) Harper '00 are the proud parents of William Edward Harper, who was born April 19,2010, in Beijing, China. All three are doing well. Kevin works as an official at the U.S. Embassy.
Rob Oakleaf ’01 is the new executive director of Ministry with Community, a shelter for the homeless in Kalamazoo. He was MwC's deputy director, and he joined the organization in 2008 as a finance and technical coordinator. Prior to that he ran is own freelance graphic and web design firm and, before that, taught web design and improvisational comedy classes at the Henry Ford Academy in Dearborn. As a child, Oakleaf served the underserved as a member of the First United Methodist Church in Kalamazoo through food drives and work with Habitat for Humanity. As president of Loy Norrix High School's National Honor Society, he helped to coordinate blood drives and other charitable events. As a "K" student, Rob tutored struggling students and gave homework assistance to area youth. He was recently featured in an article that appeared in the Kalamazoo Gazette.
Amber Schwartz ’01 is engaged to Jay Delisi. They plan a July 2010 wedding. Amber continues to work on her Ed.D. in Teacher Leadership.
Nisse Olsen ’02 is engaged to be married in July 2010. She earned her Master's degree in teaching from Colorado College and is currently employed by American International School of Lagos, Nigeria. She'll be employed next year by the American International School of Kingston, Jamaica.
Sean Mann ’03 is the project coordinator of LET'S SAVE MICHIGAN, a campaign to encourage people to get involved and promote Michigan cities so that the state can prosper again. The campaign drums up interest for ideas such as better public transit and walkable cities and neighborhoods. One idea: a contest asking artists, illustrators, and graphic designers to submit original posters to inspire Michiganders on ways to revive the state. Mann is working with the Detroit Institute of Arts on the contest. The LET'S SAVE MICHIGAN campaign is run through the Michigan Municipal League, where Mann works. Mann recently bought an abandoned home in Detroit that he is renovating.
Libby Rhee ’03 will do a medical residency in dermatology at St. Barnabas Hospital in New York City.
Brian Ruby ’04 has joined the Ruckus Theater in Chicago as a director. His directing credits with Ruckus include the world premier of The Gay American, The Gods are Crazy Blind, and Last Date. Prior to joining Ruckus, Ruby directed the Chicago premier of Phenomenon of Decline and served as assistant director for productions of Evolution and Boston Marriage.
Joe Tracz ’04 graduated from the New York University Playwriting program last May and has recently been awarded an Emerging Writer Fellowship at the prestigious Playwright's Realm in New York City.
Erin (Terkoski) Young ’04 married Cole Young (Michigan State University, Class of 2004) on October 17, 2009, in downtown Detroit. They were joined by many of their fellow alumni for their wedding day celebration. Erin and Cole live and work in Detroit, and Erin can be reached at erin.t.young@gmail.com. Pictured are (l-r): front row--Kirsten Cieslar '04, Erin and Cole, Jeremy Cook '04, Briana Jones '05, Jeff Duncan '04; back row--Michelle Busuito '04, Emily Olson Dumas '04, Allison Fox '04, Rebecca Warner '04, Terry Brock '04, Rob Hinman '04, and Harry Gaggos '04. Photo is by Michael Sackett. Email erin.t.young@gmail.com
Julia (Morillo) Fredrickson ’05 and Kyle Fredrickson '00 were married on April 19, 2009 in a 19th-century dairy barn in Grayslake, Ill. Many alumni attended. In December Julia and Kyle went to Disney World for their honeymoon. Julia is in her last semester of graduate school at Loyola University (Chicago). She is working on her M.A. in applied social psychology. Kyle works for a property management company as an administrative coordinator. They live in Chicago. Email julia.e.fredrickson@gmail.com
Colleen (Collins) Greene ’05 , a student at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine, has received a Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Fellowship, a full-tuition scholarship that will cover the cost of Colleen's Master's in Public Health degree she will earn from the Harvard School of Public Health. The MPH program includes a co-curricular leadership program through the Center for Public Leadership at the Kennedy School.
Moira Heffernan ’05 is director of instructional technology for New Dimension Media in Illinois. She works with educators throughout the state in the use of NDM's video-on-demand to augment classroom lessons.
Alexandra Lett ’05 completed her service with Peace Corps in May 2009. She is currently pursuing a Master's degree in sustainable international development at Brandeis University (Waltham, Mass.) "I will hopefully graduate in May 2011," she wrote. "If anyone is ever in the Boston area, let me know." Email alyxe_lett@yahoo.com
David Council ’06 is a new associate in the Bloomfield Hills (Mich.) office of Dykema, a leading national law firm. Council focuses on general litigation, with an emphasis on complex commercial disputes, product liability, premises actions, and consumer financial services. He earned his J.D. from Wayne State University.
Mondy Jamshidi ’06 is FastTRACK Director for the Shaklee Corporation in Hawaii. She also attends graduate school in that state, working on a degree in Global Leadership and Sustainable Development. Jamshidi has been involved with the company since her sophomore year at "K" and helped convert the College to the use of environmentally friendly cleaning products, which fit in well with the College's sustainability efforts. She went to work for Shaklee in her senior year. In Hawaii she stays involved in local green issues while she continues to build her business. "I continue to have conversations about Shaklee and conscious consumerism in the context of sustainability," she says. "It's one of the world's leading companies on sustainability matters."
Briana Kleidon ’06 accepted a job as a research specialist with Learning Point Associates in Chicago, Ill. She is relocating to the Windy City from Madison, Wis., where she has spend the past two years as a legislative analyst for the Wisconsin Legislative Audit Bureau. Email briana.kleidon@gmail.com
Patrick Lannen ’06 is an associate attorney in the Banking, Bankruptcy and Creditors' Rights Practice Group at Plunkett Cooney, one of the Midwest's oldest and largest law firms. Lannen focuses his practice in the areas of commercial litigation, financial services liability, and banking and creditors' rights. He is a 2009 graduate (magna cum laude) of the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law. He also is the co-head coach of the Birmingham Brother Rice High School Junior Varsity Soccer Team.
Amy Passiak ’06 received a Master's in Museum Studies from New York University and is currently working on a collections project at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York City. She also serves as the Tenement Talks Program Manager at the Lower East Side Tenement Museum. Email apassiak@gmail.com
Dana (Szombati) O'Neill ’06 married Jacob O'Neill on June 13, 2009, at St. Thomas Aquinas in East Lansing, Mich. Kalamazoo College alumni in attendance included Allison Bailey '06, Nicki Richtie '07, Gili Averbuch '07, Jeff Outslay '06, Dana (Szombati) O'Neill '06, Shanna Barkume '06, Julianne Chickering '06, Lisa Dallacqua '06, Lauren Russo '06, Lindsay Anderson '06, Jessica Patchak '06, and Sobia Khaja '06. Email dms.oneill@gmail.com
Rebecca Bornstein ’07 has written a chapter, "Enforcing a Nuclear Disarmament Treaty," that recently appeared in the new book Elements of a Nuclear Disarmament Treaty, edited by Dr. Barry Blechman and published by the Henry L. Stimson Center. You can find more information here.
Tyler Green ’07 spent a year teaching in Korea, after which he joined "K" alums Megan Carney '92 and playwright Holly Hughes '78 to intern at the About Face Theatre in Chicago for Let Them Eat Cake!, a community devised piece about gay marriage that received very favorable reviews.
Daniel Alt ’08 teaches kindergarten through eighth grade computer science at the Kamaile Academy in Hawaii. "I love it out here," he wrote, "and the children are wonderful. I teach in a very disadvantaged area. Ninety percent of our students are on free lunch, and many of them live in shelters, low-income housing projects, or are homeless on the beach."
Emma Perry ’08 received the 2010 Helen Clarke Fellowship from Alpha Lambda Delta's Graduate Fellowship Program. The award is one of only 23 fellowships given by Alpha Lambda Delta to its members. Perry is a member of the Kalamazoo College Chapter of Alpha Lambda Delta and will use the award to offset graduate school costs. She is currently working on her Ph.D. in English literature at Boston College. She received a similar Alpha Lambda Delta fellowship last year. The awards are very prestigious, and to receive two consecutively is amazing.
Sakhi Vyas ’08 continues work on her Master's degree in Marketing Management at IE, the world renowned business school in Madrid, Spain. She writes to her alma mater occasionally (and always articulately) regarding the value of a liberal arts undergraduate education for grad school in business. Here's an excerpt from her latest letter.

"A few things I've been reflecting on recently. 1)I think I had mentioned in an earlier e-mail about the incredible diversity of my class. This time around, I'm the token American! I am learning to observe the similarities that create a class-culture while minimizing differences within a group. Although we are from all over the world, the majority (I'd say about 80 percent) are from the capital city of their respective countries. Strangely, those of us from smaller towns bind together a bit more. There's a different world-view when you start your life in Cadiz or Kalamazoo, and then dive into exploring the world, versus growing up in a cosmopolitan city like Sao Paulo, Singapore, Moscow, or Madrid. I suspect that growing up in a smaller city exposes people like me or Maria (Cadiz) to the concept of a city-community. In smaller cities, it's easy to find the heart and soul of being part of community, which, to me, is understanding everyone's beliefs and tendencies, the events which define what is important to the people, etc. And I would venture a guess that when your first impression of the world is a place like Madrid, there's too much going on to really get a sense of that community-atmosphere. I'm grateful for the ability to reflect on my experiences in so many communities of various sizes (Kalamazoo, Beijing, Ahmedabad, Madrid). Moreover, I think that being part of cities of varying degrees of development gives you more flexibility to fit in anywhere. Most of my class would be quite horrified to hand-wash their clothes like I did in India last year or to spend nearly two weeks in a tiny village in China without a shower. I can definitely conclude from my observations that for people who have grown up in developed cities, village life is extremely unappealing. But I find it fascinating. To a great degree Kalamazoo College shaped the way I view the world, and it's incredibly enriching to be with people who have a huge-city perspective. That said, I am always more than happy to say, 'Yes, there really is a Kalamazoo and I'm from there!!' 2) Liberal arts are the way to go. I need to get my head out of this one-track-business focus. Academically, it's easy to find connections between strategy and marketing research. But I sorely miss the challenge of connecting literature, economics, history, religion, and political science in an anthropology class. I realize that I thrive on that swirl of knowledge that liberal arts can bring. For now, I think I need to engage in some sort of art or culture. My day-to-day functions are severely lacking in music (my walk to school is now accompanied by NPR podcasts, which I do enjoy), dance, arts and general culture. I've been to the Opera a few times and am a bit obsessed with NPR's 'Science Friday' programs. But, these are still passive. I don't get to participate in the Opera (I'm sure the other opera-goers are grateful for this fact!) and I don't get to explore more science outside of 'Science Friday.' I want to sink my hands into some clay and make a bowl! I'm itching to teach dance or be part of a music group, just for the fun of it! So far, my only solution is dragging my workgroup into projects like our presentation on Dannon's innovation processes. I spent an entire week studying lactic bacteria and the 3,500 different strains in Dannon's Bacterial Bank that are being tested in new yogurt products that would (eventually/hopefully) slow down the process of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Amazing, right? I taught the group about this, and we presented it to the class. We designed it as a tour (I couldn't resist). One tour guide led the class from the tech lab to the medical clinic and then back to corporate headquarters. I played the doctor and enjoyed my new (limited) scientific knowledge. I still wouldn't say that bacteria are a source of art or culture, but it was refreshingly different. It was fun to get up in front of the class and teach them about something completely out of everyone's realm of consciousness. In such a specialized program, it's easy to fall out of touch with the big picture of things..."
Terry Cangelosi ’09 wrote a play, Funny Hour With Pete Calinski, that will be produced this spring in the Late Night Series at the Whole Art Theatre (Kalamazoo).
Joan Michelle Miller ’09 has been accepted to the M.F.A. Dramatic Writing Program at College of Savannah Art & Design.
Nina Young ’09 had her Senior Individualized Project play, This House is Not a Home, read at the Black Arts & Cultural Center.

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In Memory

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1930's

Margaret (Robertson) Tuts ’32 died on December 7, 2009, at her home in New York City. She majored in French at Kalamazoo College.
Jane (Sidnam) Heath ’37 died on February 18, 2010. She earned her degree in English literature and was active in many extracurricular activities. She was secretary of Kappa Pi and secretary-treasurer of Student Senate. She sang in the choir, was a member of the Gaynor Club, and served as a student Chaplain. After graduation she was an elementary teacher in Grand Rapids, Mich., for a short period of time. Heath was a member of the Kalamazoo College Alumni Association, the American Association of University Women, and the Kalamazoo Valley Dental Auxiliary. She was a member of the Gull Lake Country Club and an excellent golfer. She also tutored in the Kalamazoo Public Schools and was an active lifelong member of St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Kalamazoo.
Jean (Smith) Renne ’37 passed away in Grove City, Ohio, on March 30, 2010. She was born May 18, 1915, in Rochester, Indiana. She spent her early childhood in Coloma, Michigan, where she graduated from high school. She then attended Kalamazoo College. Shortly after her graduation she married her sweetheart, whom she had met at the College, Harold Renne '34. She was an active member of the Methodist Church where she participated in the choir and women's society. She enjoyed reading, cooking, entertaining with dinner parties, and playing bridge. She also worked for several years as a librarian in the Illinois Municipal School system. She is survived by her son, David (Class of 1966) and his wife Paulette, daughter Carol (who attended "K" in 1961-1962) and her husband Harold Gibson, and several grandchildren and great grandchildren. Another daughter-in-law, Linda (Skoglund)Renne, attended "K" from 1963-1966. Jean's father, Roger Benjamin Smith, graduated from Kalamazoo College in 1912.
(M.D.) Homer Smathers ’38 died on February 27, 2010. He earned his medical degree from Northwestern University Medical School and then moved to Detroit for his internship and surgical residency. He worked in three area hospitals before going into private practice and joining the staff at Mt. Carmel Mercy Hospital. He was a general surgeon before specialized surgery became the norm, and he even did house calls. In 1984 he retired from private practice and did consulting work for Blue Cross Blue Shield. In 1988 he accompanied missionaries to Tanzania, and he provided medical service to the people of this East African nation for two years. He retired from his consulting work in 1997, but his interest in medicine never waned. Smathers attended hospital medical meetings, offering advice on occasion, stayed up to date on medical developments, and kept his medical license current. He contracted gastric cancer in 2007, but continued his attendance at medical meetings.
Marilyn (Barton) Wilhelm ’39 died on February 13, 2010. She came to "K" from Sturgis (Mich.) High School, where she was class co-valedictorian. She attended Kalamazoo College and graduated from University of Michigan. She taught English at Sturgis High School, then earned a Master's degree from University of Michigan, and continued her teaching career at Gross Pointe High School. She married Chris Wilhelm in 1944 and taught at Kalamazoo Central High School while he served in Europe during World War II. Their daughter was born in Detroit, and the family lived in Battle Creek and Saginaw before moving to Rochester, N.Y.

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1940's

Jack Foster ’41 died on December 27, 2009. He earned his Bachelor's degree in political science. Following service in World War II, Jack returned to "K" to complete a Master's degree in public administration. He worked for the city of Midland as assistant city manager and city assessor for 33 years, retiring in 1981. During his career Jack served as president of the Michigan Assessors Association (1953-54) and on various committees and advisory panels of the Michigan Municipal League and the Michigan Tax Commission.
Ruth (Davis) Brown ’43 died on January 16, 2010. A native of Cassopolis, Michigan, she transferred to Kalamazoo College from Stephens College and majored in sociology. She was a member of Kappa Pi and the College Singers. Brown was 88 years old when she died from pneumonia and heart failure.
Patricia (Kennett) Powers ’46 died on February 28, 2010. She majored in music and earned a Master's in that subject from University of Michigan. Soon after, she joined the music department at the University of Arkansas (Fayetteville), where she met and married Jack Powers, Jr., on June 5, 1948. She continued her teaching career at Del Mar Junior College (Corpus Christi, Texas) and taught music privately. She and her husband were founding members of St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church where Patricia was the organist. When she and Jack moved to Beeville, Texas, Patricia continued to teach music privately and at Bee County College. She also organized music teachers in the smaller communities of south Texas through the Texas Music Teachers Association. She served in many positions in that organization and also in the Music Teachers National Association. After her retirement she was named a Fellow to the MTNA and worked as a consultant.
Evelyn (Utz) Wright ’49 died on May 20, 2009. She earned her degree in biology at "K" and earned a Master's degree in the subject from New York University. She taught biology and chemistry at Pleasantville (New York) High School for more than 28 years. She was an adviser for the yearbook and cheerleaders and a class adviser for 15 years. Wright was a member of several Middle State inspection teams and spent several summers in Albany writing Regents questions for chemistry and biology tests.

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1950's

Ann (Robinson) Fair ’50 died on November 22, 2009. She spent two years at Kalamazoo College before completing her degree (elementary education) at Western Michigan University. In 1950 she married Jerry Fair, who survives. They had five children and six grandchildren. Ann taught for many years in Coldwater, Michigan, before moving to Maryland, where she was the director of a child care center.
Paul Gleason ’50 died on October 5, 2009, in Rochester, New York. He was a graduate of Mt. Hermon School, Northfield Center (Mass.) in 1944, then served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. After graduating from "K", Gleason enrolled and graduated from the Andover Newton Theological School (Newton Centre, Mass.). He served American Baptist churches in Millbury, Massachusetts; Norwich, New York; Lockport, New York; and Rochester, New York. Gleason is survived by his wife, Dorothy Cochran Gleason, two children and three grandchildren.
Bob Dye ’51 died on February 5, 2010. He was a local (Honolulu, Hawaii) author, historian, journalist, and a former aide to Honolulu Mayor Frank Fasi and U.S. Representative Cec Heftel. Dye graduated from "K" with a degree in theater arts and later earned a Master's degree (English) from Western Michigan University. He lived most of his life in Honolulu, and he loved Hawaii, its people, its culture, and its history. The latter was the subject of many articles he wrote for Honolulu Magazine and several of his books, including Merchant Prince of the Sandalwood Mountains: Afong and the Chinese in Hawaii. That book was about the state's first Chinese millionaire. Dye published his first novel, Humble Honest Men, last June. At the time of his death, Dye was at work on a book (working title: Travels with Ali'i) about King Kalakaua's travels to the West Coast, New York, London, Scotland, and France. Dye is survived by five children.
Susan (Ralston) Louis ’53 died on January 28, 2010. She began her college years at Kalamazoo College, her parents' alma mater. She played on the Women's Tennis Team, like her mother had in the 1910s. Susan developed a love for theatre and completed her degree in that discipline after her transfer to University of Michigan, where she performed alongside fellow student James Earl Jones. After graduating she married Warren Louis, and after he completed his commitment in the U.S. military, the couple returned to Kalamazoo. Susan began her own business (making and selling hand-painted buttons to gift and apparel stores across the country), mastered the game of golf, opened a gift store in Saugatuck, Mich., started the first Bed & Breakfast in Southwestern Michigan, and managed to raise two kids. She is survived by her husband and two children, seven grandchildren, a sister, and a brother.
Donald Isaacson ’57 died on October 22, 2009. Isaacson attended "K" for three years before leaving college to work as an entertainer in New York City. During his service in the U.S. Army he won the All-Army entertainment contest and toured for two years entertaining troops throughout the U.S. He assumed the stage name "Don Lane" and worked alongside Wayne Newton in Las Vegas. Later he became the first headline act at the Dunes Nightclub in Honolulu, Hawaii. In 1965 he took a position as host for an Australian television version of Johnny Carson's Tonight Show. Eventually the Don Lane Show became the highest rated variety program in Australian television history. In the 1990s he worked as a sportscaster in basketball and football for ABC, covering Super Bowls and NCAA basketball.

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1960's

David M. Thayer ’64 died on March 13, 2010. He was born in Coldwater, Michigan, and grew up on Wall Lake, attending Delton Kellogg High School. He attended Kalamazoo College and later received a Master's degree equivalent in industrial engineering and mechanical engineering. After graduation he worked for General Motors as a production engineer and for Humphrey Products, where he became vice president for manufacturing. In 1981 he moved to the San Francisco Bay area and held executive positions with several software start-up companies.
Charlie Wicks ’67 died on March 11, 2010, from complications related to his battle with cancer. At "K" he majored in biology, and he studied abroad in Munster, Germany. Wicks was the founder, owner, and CEO of Pro Co Sound, a global presence in the audio industry. He was a gifted organist and performed in a band prior to the forming Pro Co. Wicks also was involved in the care and well being of local abandoned animals. He and his wife, Willie, formed the organization Canine Safe Harbor in 2006, and they personally provided care for dogs that had lost their families.

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1970's

Bruce Peck ’72 died on January 23, 2010. He majored in biology at "K" and studied abroad in Munster, Germany. He played football for the Hornets and was a tri-captain of the team his senior year. For 32 years he worked as an optometrist. He is survived by his wife, three children, two brothers, three sisters, and many nieces and nephews.
James Jacobs ’75 died on February 28, 2010. He majored in French at "K" and attended Universite de Caen for his foreign study. During his career service quarter he interned with Senator Jacob Javits in Washington, D.C. He earned his law degree from Valparaiso (Indiana) University in 1978. As an attorney Jacobs worked most recently at the Office of Regional Conflict Counsel in Punta Gorda and Fort Myers, Florida. He worked for many years as a public defender in Volusia and Flagler Counties when he resided in Palm Coast and also as a public defender in DeSoto County. Prior to 1997 he had a private law practice in Frankenmuth, Michigan.

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Friends

Charleen (Green) Cox died on March 18, 2010. She worked as the office coordinator for the College's Education Department from 1989 to 1995. She also volunteered for Covenant Senior Day Care.
Caroline Robinson died on January 12, 2010, at her home in Ada, Michigan, surrounded by her family. She was the wife of John Twist '70 and a graduate (1978) of Aquinas College. For 33 years with her husband she created, organized, managed, and directed University Motors, a local MG sports car business of international acclaim. She leaves her husband and their four children, ages 17 to 24.

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